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Old 10-25-2012, 02:54 PM   #1
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green terror

Any experts or anyone who can educate me on this beautiful fish??
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Old 10-25-2012, 03:16 PM   #2
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Could u post a picture?
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Old 10-25-2012, 03:25 PM   #3
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Of a green terror?
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Old 10-25-2012, 03:28 PM   #4
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This is him/her
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Old 10-25-2012, 03:29 PM   #5
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Nice fish!!!

recommendedfor aquarists with aquariums smaller than 55gallons/209 liters. If youwish to house the Green terror cichlid with other fish, the aquarium must be even larger, and it is very important that you select suitable tank mates since the Green terror cichlidis a highly aggressive species. It is not considered dangerous tohumans, but it canbe very violent towards fish.

The scientific name for the true Green terror cichlid is Aequidens rivulatus, but several other fish species are sold underthe name Green terror cichlid, including the Blue Acara (Aequidens pulcher). The Blue Acara is anothercichlid belongingtothe same genus as the true Green terrorcichlid.

The natural habitat for the Green terrorcichlidis found in Ecuador and Peru inSouth America, where the Spanish speakingpopulation commonly refers to it as Vieja fish. The typical Greenterror cichlid environment is the coastalstreams that you can find onthe Pacific side of these twocountries. The Green terrorhabitat begins inthe RiverEsmeraldas inEcuador andcontinues to the RiverTumbesin Peru. Today, the Green terror cichlid is also breed in aquacultures for the aquarium trade. The species is not a popular food fishand it is not included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Wild Green terror cichlids have a minimum population doubling time of less than 15 months, so the Green terrorcichlid populationis comparativelyresilient inthisregard.

The Green terror cichlid is found in warm waters in tropical Ecuador and Peru, and will require a water temperature of 20- 24į C (69-75į F) in the aquarium. The preferredpHis near 7(neutral), but Green terror cichlids can adapt toslightly alkaline as well as slightly acidic conditions. Keepthe pH above 6.5 and below 8.0 and avoid the extremes, as well as rapid changes within this interval. The dHrangefor the Green terrorcichlid is 25.

The Green terror cichlid has a stunning appearance and the adult specimens feature a bright and sparkling green or green-blue coloration. Every scale is decorated with a marking of a darker green colorthat together forms sets of broken stripes alongthe body of the Greenterror cichlid. The back of the body has an olive green shade covering the upper part, while the flanks tend to be of paler color. The underside is pink or brownish. Up to four golden lateral stripes on the main body will serve to make the Green terror cichlid even more beautiful. You can also see sparkling turquoise streaks and dots on the cheeks, and the fins are decorated with blue or green markings. You can obtain two different color variations of Green terror cichlid. The edges of tail and dorsal fins will be yellow to orange in the first variant andpure white inthe second.

If youpurchase a juvenile Greenterror cichlid, it might not be greenyet.The colors will develop when the fish matures; young Green terror cichlids are always camouflaged by a tan base color with silvery blue speckles. If the colors of your adult Green terror cichlid start tofade, there is most likely something wrong with the water quality in the aquarium. Sufficient filtration and frequent water changes is necessary toprevent theGreen terrorcichlid from turning dull.

As recognized from many other cichlid species, the male Green terror cichlid features a large and prominent headwitha bighump(a socallednuchal hump). Adult fishes of bothsexes have longand flowingfins that add totheirbeauty.The body of is deepandoval. The caudal finis rounded.

Male Green terror cichlids can grow up to 30 centimeters (12 inches) in length, but this is quite uncommon and roughly 20 centimeters (8 inches) is a more reasonable expectation. The largest females grow up to 20 centimeters (8 inches), while a majority of the females stay smaller than 15 centimeters (6 inches). Some studies indicate that a sub-species of Aequidens rivulatus might exist, andthis is a dwarf variant that neverbecomes biggerthan13 centimeters (5inches)
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Old 10-25-2012, 03:30 PM   #6
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The Green terror cichlid is a benthopelagic creature in the wild and when you place it in your aquarium it will not stay withina limited depthregion. Its habitat will stretchfrom the bottom tothe surface andit willsearchforfood inall parts of the tank.

The Greenterror cichlidcantypically be trained ontoa wide range of different foods, includingflakes and pellets, since it is an omnivore opportunist. Larger specimens will naturally prefer large food particles like big pellets or big live food, rather than tiny pieces of flake food. A varied diet is recommendedandlive food is always appreciated.

As mentioned earlier in this article, the Green terror cichlid is an aggressive fish species and you must carefully plan the aquarium set up and tank mates. The juvenile specimens frequently sold by fish stores will eventually turn into highly aggressive adult specimens, and if they are kept with unsuitable species they might kill them even if they have lived together for a long time. Never combine your Green terror cichlid with small fish that can’t fend for them selves. Similarly aggressive cichlids that will not tolerate being bullied are a better choice, and fights can usually be prevented by keeping your fish in a large and well decoratedaquarium. Choose fish of similar size, orfishbiggerthan your Greenterror cichlid. Big barbs are one suggestion, and sturdy schoolingfish is alsofrequently kept withthe Green terrorcichlid. Since a male Greenterror cichlid cangrow up to 20-30 centimeters (8-12 inches) and must be kept with other fish of similar size, a community aquarium containinga Greenterror cichlidmust be verylarge.

Keepingyour Green terrorcichlid inits own aquarium is anotheralternative, or dividing the aquarium using glass or a net. Sometimes old Green terror cichlids must be moved to a private/divided aquarium since they can become extremely violent. The appropriate aquarium size will naturally depend on which species you plan to keep yourGreen terror cichlid with, or if you plan to give it its own aquarium. A youngGreen terror cichlid that has not grown larger than5 inches/13 centimeters will usually do fine ina 35 gallon/132 liter aquarium that is at least 36 inches/91 centimeters long. An adult Green terror cichlid will require a 55 gallon/209 liter aquarium or bigger, and the aquarium should be at least 48 inches/122 centimeters long. A tank smaller than 100 gallon/379 liter is not recommendedfora community aquarium.

The aquarium decorationis especially important in a community aquarium, but a single Greenterror cichlid will naturally also appreciate a well decorated aquarium. The Green terror cichlid is a prodigious digger and plants anchored in the substrate will usually be dug up. Floating plants, or plants that can be secured somewhere else than in the substrate, are better choices. There are also a few very hard plant species that can survive being dug up. Always leave a big open area for swimming in the aquarium. Roots and rocks should preferably always be included in the aquarium set up, and they are more important than plants. Roots and rocks must be safely securedorplaced directlyon the aquarium glass to avoidaccidents.

Green terror cichlids are successfully bred in aquariums and aquacultures, and are considered moderately difficult. Just like many other cichlids, the Green terror cichlid deposit eggs that they guardand care for. The Green terror cichlids will form pairs, andcan often be coaxedinto spawning by an increased water temperature. Turn the temperature up to 25-27į C (77-81į F) and make sure that the pH stays near 6.5. The recommended water hardiness is 5 to 8 dH. Sexing Green terror cichlids is not difficult at all, since the adult male develops a distinct hump on his forehead. The male is also typically larger than the female. It is easier to make young adult Green terror cichlids form pairs comparedtoolder specimens.
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Old 10-25-2012, 03:46 PM   #7
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Vin thanks but I already read that lol I was looking for personal experience. Again thank you very much for posting the info.
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Old 10-25-2012, 04:43 PM   #8
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No worries dude
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Old 10-25-2012, 05:22 PM   #9
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I have one in a 63 gallion (240 litre) tank along with a Jack Dempsey. They are both only 4" or 5'. They were both introduced together and are getting along fine but the Jack Dempsey does chase the Green Terror a fair bit. Not caused any damage though, the GT is pretty quick.

Mine is a bit skittish but then so is my JD. Think that's probably cos they are both still young. Does spend a lot of time in open water rather than hiding like the JD does.

They are quite undemanding really, seems to accept all foods. Have been told you need to vary the diet though as they can used to one food and become fussy eaters. I feed mine brineshrimp, prawns, krill, bloodworm, daphnia, flakes and cichlid pellets. So it's pretty varied and he or she seems happy enough. Don't know sex yet as think its too early, will wait and see if it develops a nuchal hump.

They are great fish, beautiful looking and have personality. I know they will get aggressive as they get older but so far its been fine.
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Old 10-25-2012, 05:59 PM   #10
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Thanks chew. Was gonna comment about how they get aggressive as they get older but I see you hit on that.
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