Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Nano Reefs
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 01-16-2013, 06:24 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
marty20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 233
seahorse

So im thinking about starting a small seahorse tank. Im open to suggestions on just about anything. From tank size to corals to species and tank mates. Would like to keep it under 20 gallons though and I was thinking about dwarf seahorses. How would you do it?
__________________

__________________
marty20 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2013, 10:26 PM   #2
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Psychocircus91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Maryland
Posts: 723
How experienced are you with saltwater? under 20 gallons= tough tank. dwarf seahorses= super tough tank. They require constant live food, very low flow, and pristine water conditions.
__________________

__________________
Temporarily Tankless
Psychocircus91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2013, 10:35 PM   #3
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
marty20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 233
I have had a 20 gallon tank set up for over 7 months now and ill admit I had a rocky start with it but now it had been stable for 5 months. With multiple corals and small fish. I live very close to my lfs so I don't have to pay for any water testing and get them once a week at least. Could you give me some pointers? I am not concerned with the "work" involved with the seahorses because I enjoy doing all that
__________________
marty20 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2013, 10:38 PM   #4
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
marty20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 233
Im hoping this page becomes a kind of encyclopedia of information on seahorses so I can refer back to it and make the best decisions possible.
__________________
marty20 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2013, 10:42 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Psychocircus91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Maryland
Posts: 723
As long as you know what you're getting into it's certainly not impossible. If you went up to thirty gallons, you could get an easier species of seahorse, but I know that may not be an option.
Like I said, constant supply of live food, freshly hatched brine shrimp (read that within 24 hours of hatching is best)
I don't have a ton of information, just thought I'd chime in from the few articles I've read.

Haven't seen anyone on this site with dwarf seahorses yet, but maybe someone with experience will chime in.
__________________
Temporarily Tankless
Psychocircus91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2013, 11:17 PM   #6
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
marty20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 233
I appreciate it. And im open to suggestions like I said. Those were just my initial thoughts. I read about frequent water changes with the seahorse tank but in my tank now I don't do regular wc often. I don't think I have to because I monitor the food very closely and have a great cleanup crew. What are your thoughts?
__________________
marty20 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2013, 11:24 PM   #7
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
ktomminello's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 1,227
Please, unless you are a VERY experienced saltwater aquarist save yourself the money, frustration and most likely death of a misunderstood often impulse buy species. These guys need ABSOLUTELY pristine water conditions and they will die if your temperature varies more than 3 degrees. Though they are beautiful and unique they are best left to the pros....
__________________
ktomminello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2013, 11:27 PM   #8
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Psychocircus91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Maryland
Posts: 723
Feeding is probably the most difficult part about dwarf seahorses. Here is some basic info from allthesea.com


Seahorses - Aquarium Settings
Seahorses require many holdfasts, as they become stressed if they cannot hold onto something with their tails. The best holdfasts are natural surfaces such as "living rocks." Excellent substitutes are soft plastic plants. They should be quite tall and have many branching parts. It is also important to provide a reasonably complex environment so the seahorses can escape into hidden corners. They become stressed it they are too exposed. It's also a good idea to have a tank backing to give them a reference point and to help them orientate.
Seahorses - Companions in the watertank
It's very important not to put seahorses in an aquarium with fast, agile fishes or with aggressive feeders. They tend to do best in invertebrate aquaria but otherwise they can be kept with dragonettes (Callionymus bairdi), tiny trunk fishes (Lactophrys trigonus), small pipefishes (although it has been suggested that these may become 'fin pickers'; as they grow), blennies, etc. Never place seahorses with active feeders such as damselfish, puffers, butterfly Sea Fish or angelfish. Blennies in particular make quite good companions because they help to keep the tank clean.
Seahorses - Lighting in your watertank
Seahorses interact most in the hours just after dawn. I suggest, therefore, that you keep seahorses on 3 hours half-light/10 hours light/3 hours half-light/8 hours dark. The half-light can be produced by a lamp some distance from the aquarium.
Seahorses - Feeding your sea-horses
Seahorses eat a great deal but are rather particular. Feeding seahorses is one of the most difficult aspects of keeping them in captivity. Seahorses usually eat only live, fresh food. They need food variety and cannot be fed solely on Artemia as these alone provide a highly unbalanced diet. With patience and effort, you may convince seahorses to eat some frozen foods and these can be a good backup when fresh food fails. However, you must not rely solely on frozen foods as these alone will eventually result in malnutrition and illness.
Seahorses - Healthcare
Seahorse are vulnerable to many fungal, bacterial and parasitic ailments and infestations and few seahorses ever recover from a serious illness. Seahorses should be inspected every day for changes in their health and any ailment treated immediately; one seahorse's illness usually hits all seahorses in the tank very quickly. Any ill seahorse should be isolated at once. If in doubt, I risk treating them with a wide-spectrum antibiotic.
Buoyancy problems are fairly specific to seahorses. Any seahorse staying constantly near the surface is almost certainly an ill seahorse. You should react at once as buoyancy problems are serious and often fatal. Again, prevention is better than cure. Try to ensure that you have no dissolved gases in your system (in contrast to suspended gases) as these appear to be a major trouble source. Symptoms are the following:
  • A grossly distended body - by then, the problem is far advanced (3)
  • Inflated pouch not due to pregnancy - avoid wishful thinking if the animal hasn't been near a female (1)
  • A constant head down position when swimming (1,2,3)
  • The tail curled well back and up behind the trunk (2)
  • Small bumps on body surface (2)
  • Tightly curled position (when trying to descend), held for an unusually long period with little progress (1,2,3)
  • Immediately bobbing to surface after release from holdfast (1,3)
  • Lying approximately horizontally at water surface, even if the tail is holding something (1,3)
The number(s) in brackets refers to possible causes and solutions below.
  1. Air trapped in the pouch (males). You can try the following to release the air. Do not lift the animal out of the water. Keep the seahorse underwater and massage the pouch gently. Hold the head upwards so the air can escape. Stretch the pouch between your thumb and forefinger. Manipulate gently and insert a hollow, blunt small-bore object (e.g. plastic tubing). Exert gentle pressure on the pouch. The gas may escape via the tube. Move the tube gently around if needed. You may need to suck on tube as you massage pouch (yuck!). Ensure that you get the air out. Then monitor that animal as buoyancy problems tend to reoccur in the same animals. This problem is especially prevalent around courtship periods and occurs if males dilate the pouch opening in air streams.
  2. Air trapped under the skin is a more acute problem. Use a sterile syringe needle (with a tiny diameter). Slip it gently (at an angle) under the skin to pierce a small hole. Remove the needle and then massage the bubbles out while the animal is under water. Pierce all the bubbles you see because they are usually interconnected and missing once causes a repeat performance. Keep the Sea Animal in a very clean tank after puncturing the skin.
  3. Air trapped internally is very serious and generally results in death. I am unable to suggest anything useful to do in this case. Try to detect this condition early on as it only worsens. Seahorses appear to have no solutions of their own and become very stressed by such buoyancy problems. Seahorses in this condition have massively bloated bodies and get several related problems such as sores, skin cracks, frayed and tattered tails, bony plate separation and internal injuries.
__________________
Temporarily Tankless
Psychocircus91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2013, 09:16 PM   #9
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
marty20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 233
That's really great stuff thanks a lot! And im not planning on starting for a couple months here so it isn't an impulse buy. Im always looking for a challenge and I think the seahorses are it.
__________________

__________________
marty20 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
seahorse

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off








» Photo Contest Winners








All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.