Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater Reef Aquaria
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 01-09-2006, 08:52 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 14
Another "rounding out my tank" Question

I currently have a lohghorn cowfish, One Spot Foxface rabbitfish,flame angel, and falco(dwarf) hawkfish in order of addition to aquarium.

I have a 75 gallon (4ft long) tank set-up with a sump with bioballs (I read that adding LR would be better than the balls?) and a protein skimmer. The substrate is crushed coral with about 50lbs +/- LR and 40lbs +/- other assorted rocks.

I have thought about adding a pair of black and white clowns, a large angel, a blennie (will it get along with my hafkfish?), a bluesided wrasse (no sand is a problem?) What about a pygmy angel?

I am not set on any of those fish for sure.

What are your opinions on what I should add to finish my list? I like to focus on different colors and quantity (doesn't everyone!)

Is it typical that flames eat feather dusters? Mine ate all 7 of them.

I wouldn't mind on larger centerpiece fish either. (Emperor, koran)

The tank has been running for 3 years, but I just recently purchased it. I returned 3 cinnamon clowns (didn't like the color), a 3 stripe damsel (loved the color but was too aggressive), 2 pajama cardinals (ugly IMO), 2 blue green chromis (full size and wanted to add more, LFS said that I might want to return them) In addition I had a Lamark angel and returned it to get the Flame (only one dwarf angel allowed.)

What do you think?
__________________

__________________
SaltyFBCoach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2006, 08:25 AM   #2
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
For starters...does't matter if the tank has been running for three years if you just got it...unless you were able to save most of the water and bio. Even so, there is a period when the bio needs to reestablish itself to avoid ammonia spikes. If none of the water was saved or none of the bio, then it should be considered a 'new' tank. How long has the tank been up and running with fish in it from the time you set it up?

You cannot populate a tank that size with a lot of fish. When it comes to marine fish 75 gallons can be small. The longhorn cow alone will be too big someday for the tank. The foxface is also a large species and should have ample room for swimming. You wouldn't have a successful tank with all those fish you want. Check up on the adult sizes of species BEFORE purchasing. You may be able to get away with the flame, hawk, pair of clowns, and perhaps a smaller species of tang like a yellow and scopas tang and a damsel or two (they should be the last ones in) but that may be as far as it goes when it comes to territory.

All angels will eat feather dusters and other fan type worms as well as sponges and other coral, but this protein is a must for longevity in captivity. Offer foods specific for angels. They have sponge in the ingredients.

A rule of thumb with angels...though not impossible...it is not recommended to house them together especially in that sized tank. The flame would probably pick on the pygmy. They are both considered dwarfs. For best results in mixing angels...one large species to a dwarf...and let the dwarf be in there first.

A 75 gallon tank is not big enough for an adult of any of the larger species of angels. They get huge...18" average.

Wrasses need substrate deep enough and soft enough for them to dive in. Without it...they stress, become injured, then die...or jump out.

I'd strongly recommend that you do some heavy reading on marine aquariums before adding anything else to the tank. From what I'm reading here...you are already beyond what the tank can house comfortably for when the fish are adults.

It's exciting to have a new tank, but be patient and learn...read, ask questions, and learn. Most aquarium marine animals are wild caught. The least we can do is make their lives as comfortable as possible to insure a happy and healthy life. That means a lot of self discipline against all those impulsive urges to get that real cool looking fish. Learn about the animal first and what the average adult size is along with all their captive requirements.
__________________

__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2006, 06:11 PM   #3
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 14
I agree with everything you said. I have done quite a bit of reading which is why I left questions for conformation more than strict advice.

I got 55 gallons of water with the tank, it was more of a move than a re-establishing of the tank. My reading have been 0 for ammonia and nitrates, I have it tested weekly. Nitrites have been 0 as well. It was a well established tank and I knew the important things to get were the water and substrate for the good bacteria.

I also understand that the boxfish will be too big at some point and will have to be removed and that my max inches of adult fish is somewhere around 15-20.

I like the idea of black clowns, flame angel, rabbitfish, hawkfish and (fill in the blank.)
__________________
SaltyFBCoach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 08:50 AM   #4
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
fish for ur tank...

I don't agree with the inches bit of how to populate a tank. Too many variables. It really depends on the species and available territory. A six inch wrasse for example will need more room than a six inch blenny.

What I call 'free swimmers' are fish that need ample room to satisfy their motivative means. Tangs for example are naturally open water swimmers and are highly active fish. They need so much more room than the average. The larger species of angels are also open water swimmers, though not nearly as active as tangs. Angels are thicker and weigh more per how ever many inches, therefore a bit slower moving. To top it off...both are naturally schooling fish. You'd need a SeaWorld size tank to pull that off!! LOL.

There are a few fish that can live in there without out growing the tank. You may not like Pajama Cardinals, but Bangi Cardinals are awesome. Nice striking pattern of black and silverish white. Smaller species of File fish would do well. Tile fish also...just check on size. Sharpnose puffers. Anthias fish are really beautiful. There are several species ranging in various sizes. Just check on adult size first and make sure the lid is well secured. They are Olympian jumpers. I swear they can fly!! Just not for long...lol. Royal grammas can do ok without a reef so long as water quality is well maintained. Pseudochromis are a hardy fish...and agnostic to their own kind. General rule is only one per tank...including the grammas. Even in a large tank full of rock...they'll find each other. The only species I know of that can live together if introduced together in a very large system are blackcapped basslets. That's my favorite fish. Those are harder to keep than the Royal grammas. Not good for fish only tanks either. They are a deep reef fish. Another fish that comes to mind that I really like is what we call a banana fish. I took a gander at google to find photos, but evidently that may not be a commonly used name. So I have my own photo. Cool fish. Doesn't get very big...maybe 6 or 7 inches, slender and swims about the middle of the tank. They don't seem to harm anything that I've seen and are a nice purple and yellow striped color. If I think of others...I'll tag it on the thread.

One more idea...if you choose...there is a trigger that could live in there. The Blue Jaw. They are fairly docile than all the other triggers; smaller species too...about 7 to 9 inches. Still should be introduced last, but a nice fish.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bananafish.jpg (134.8 KB, 48 views)
__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
tan

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Duckweed" (Lemna Minor) and "Water Spangles" (Salvinia Minima) floating plants jackdaniel Archive 3 09-28-2009 11:16 AM
The "top" of my 2ft tank needs "fixing" marchmaxima Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 23 03-27-2008 10:57 AM
"Thread" "worms" What's in my 10gal tank HouseDragon Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 4 10-06-2006 04:02 PM
question re: "converting" existing tank _brokenglass_ Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 2 12-30-2005 01:55 PM
"Quicky question" This is driving me nuts (IN-TANK hannibal_lector DIY Projects 3 10-08-2005 02:23 AM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.