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Old 07-09-2013, 11:01 AM   #1
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Canister filter good or bad

Canister filter good or bad I've just brought one and wondered how often to clean it out any thoughts ?
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:27 AM   #2
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It has its ups on downs and I just depends on how you maintain your tank and the filter. I tend to clean my tank and replace certain pads every month like a phosphate pad and replace everything else that came in the kit like ever 6 months. Most pads that came in my canister said the pads should be replaced every year and are wash able. So when I do clean my canister I wash out the pads in old tank water I just siphoned out and brush any algae, the seals and take out the sand because those can start leaks.
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:33 AM   #3
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How often do you clean the filter and pads once every two weeks ok ? Thanks
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:50 AM   #4
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How often do you clean the filter and pads once every two weeks ok ? Thanks
I clean my reef every 1-2 weeks and my filter once a month. I take a my phosphate pad every month I clean my filter and replace .every other pad I just wash it in new ro/di water or my old tank water and put them back in.
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Old 07-09-2013, 09:35 PM   #5
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bad IMO but if you do go with it clean it weekly, would be better off with a good quality skimmer
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Old 07-09-2013, 10:17 PM   #6
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I have a protein skimmer and a internal filter and 20 kg live rock as well as the canister filter but instead of getting more L R I got the filter so I've got more space in the tank I hope it's enough thanks
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:44 PM   #7
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This is a topic that you will see differing opinions on. The problem with canister filters is not that they don’t work on saltwater or reef aquariums, they work very well. Any biological filter is going to produce nitrate on a closed aquarium system, it is the natural end product of the nitrogen cycle.

This is why many reef tank owners will remove the bio balls from their wet dry filters, or run their systems on a sump only set up, in an effort to reduce nitrate production. This is why some people are of the opinion that canister filters should not be used on a reef tank. You can get away with this approach if you have a sufficient amount of live rock and substrate in your aquarium to act as your biological filter. In fact, live rock is an excellent source of nitrifying bacteria, and will function as a very efficient biological filter in an aquarium with enough rock. Most reef set ups will work well without a dedicated biological filter, so long as the biological load is not too high, and you are using a good protein skimmer. This method is often referred to as a “Berlin” style aquarium (lots of live rock, good water movement, heavy protein skimming, and no biological filter). Canister filters can still be used on reef tanks, they can be used as additional biological filters in heavily stocked tanks, and can easily be used for whatever chemical filtration media you may want to use.

Saltwater fish only tanks are a different story; in most cases you will need a biological filter to handle the fish waste and biological load, even if your tank has live rock in it. You will also want to have a mechanical filter on a saltwater fish tank, especially if you have large fish in your tank. Most canister filters give you the ability to operate them in different ways. You can use them for biological, mechanical or chemical filtration as needed.

Nitrate is going to be produced in any set up, some more than others. My best advice is to use as much filtration as your aquarium demands. Ammonia and Nitrite should be near zero in an established aquarium, if you are detecting either, chances are your aquariums biological filter is insufficient. Nitrate levels will creep up slowly over time in any system, so whatever filtration method you employ, you still need to monitor your water chemistry. Water changes will remove nitrate from your aquarium, so as long as you are testing your water, and performing regular water changes, nitrates should not be a problem.
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:54 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by fishmonkey View Post
This is a topic that you will see differing opinions on. The problem with canister filters is not that they don’t work on saltwater or reef aquariums, they work very well. Any biological filter is going to produce nitrate on a closed aquarium system, it is the natural end product of the nitrogen cycle.

This is why many reef tank owners will remove the bio balls from their wet dry filters, or run their systems on a sump only set up, in an effort to reduce nitrate production. This is why some people are of the opinion that canister filters should not be used on a reef tank. You can get away with this approach if you have a sufficient amount of live rock and substrate in your aquarium to act as your biological filter. In fact, live rock is an excellent source of nitrifying bacteria, and will function as a very efficient biological filter in an aquarium with enough rock. Most reef set ups will work well without a dedicated biological filter, so long as the biological load is not too high, and you are using a good protein skimmer. This method is often referred to as a “Berlin” style aquarium (lots of live rock, good water movement, heavy protein skimming, and no biological filter). Canister filters can still be used on reef tanks, they can be used as additional biological filters in heavily stocked tanks, and can easily be used for whatever chemical filtration media you may want to use.

Saltwater fish only tanks are a different story; in most cases you will need a biological filter to handle the fish waste and biological load, even if your tank has live rock in it. You will also want to have a mechanical filter on a saltwater fish tank, especially if you have large fish in your tank. Most canister filters give you the ability to operate them in different ways. You can use them for biological, mechanical or chemical filtration as needed.

Nitrate is going to be produced in any set up, some more than others. My best advice is to use as much filtration as your aquarium demands. Ammonia and Nitrite should be near zero in an established aquarium, if you are detecting either, chances are your aquariums biological filter is insufficient. Nitrate levels will creep up slowly over time in any system, so whatever filtration method you employ, you still need to monitor your water chemistry. Water changes will remove nitrate from your aquarium, so as long as you are testing your water, and performing regular water changes, nitrates should not be a problem.
Very well said and when choosing systems you should always know the ups and downs of filters.
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:23 AM   #9
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Wow thanks
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Old 07-10-2013, 01:02 AM   #10
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Always happy to help!
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