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Old 03-14-2005, 11:49 AM   #11
steve-s
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midiman
They attribute cessation of pulsing to pH below 8.3, and meltdown below 8.0, with alk and iodine being contributing factors.
Actually there is no direct scientific link to what causes them to stop/start pulsing, hence all the "hype". It's all completely anecdotal.

As far as the alkalinity and pH are concerned, unless you have a cronicly low pH or a heavily stocked tank, there is absolutely no reason to maintain a higher than NSW level. If alkalinity is in the right range it will support the pH as long as the tank is stocked appropriately in considration to waste producers. If so, then pH will regularly stay above 8.0 in the day unless supressed environmentally. Even then, pH will natuarally fall below 8.0 in the early AM due to CO2 production from algaes. The only way to avoid or lessen that is to drip kalk or use a reverse lit refugium with macro algaes.

If you plan on adding scleractinians to the tank in future, the higher chemistry will do them no benefit. They will end up depositing the CaCO3 faster but in doing so the skelatons will be thin and brittle. Often easily damaged and having malformed shapes. Branching LPS and SPS will have thin reedy stalks that will break off easily and typically be quite unhealthy.

You would end up sacrificing the overall health of the tank for the hypothetical observations of one coral. Keep the water parameters healthy, the chemistry within NSW levels and the appropriate light for a given species is for the most part key in keeping any coral. Some require or do better with additional food sources but ther than that it's not in your best interest to add chemicals that you cannot directly link to the corals requirements.

Cheers
Steve
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Old 03-14-2005, 11:58 AM   #12
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Excellent. Thanks again, Steve. They also spoke at length on the FAQs pages about Xenia suffering from being "downwind" of aggressive corals like mushrooms (release of chemicals by mushrooms,etc.). (The people doing the responding on that FAQ forum are Bob Fenner and Anthony Calfo. ??)

I'll keep my parameters within normal limits. I realize that stability is key, and I'm actually getting the hang of it now!!!

I realize that this thread is evolving into something other than my original coralline question. Sorry about that.
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30 gal standard 55 lbs LR, 60 lb live sand, 10 gal sump/refugium. Urchin skimmer, mag7 pump, 3 x 96W PC combination 10,000K/actinic bulb, 2 blue LED moonlights
SG 1.024, temp 79.5, pH 8.4

Livestock I added:

1 skunk cleaner. 12 hermits: red, scarlet, blue. 15 or so assorted snails. Discosomas, Ricordia, Rhodactis mushroom corals, chaetomorpha (sump), 1 feather duster, Montipora digitata, Montipora capricornis, Montipora hispids. assorted zoos, Xenia, Kenya tree coral, green Sinularia, green star polyps, branching hammer coral, bubble coral, Devil's hand leather. Yellow chromis, purple firefish.

Hitchhikers: the usual suspects :crabs, bristles, urchin, mantis shrimp (now in exile in mantis tank)

List of possible/likely newcomers:

Feather duster. PJ cardinal, Bangghai cardinal, Firefish goby, Clownfish, Neon goby, Yellow watchman goby, Orchid dottyback. Various corals.
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Old 03-14-2005, 12:05 PM   #13
steve-s
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Originally Posted by midiman
They also spoke at length on the FAQs pages about Xenia suffering from being "downwind" of aggressive corals like mushrooms (release of chemicals by mushrooms,etc.). (The people doing the responding on that FAQ forum are Bob Fenner and Anthony Calfo. ??)
Very true. Xeniid's in general are quite week on the chemical defense front and are often the loser in that regard. Makes it easy to control their growth to some degree. You will find in a heavily stocked soft or LPS tank, carbon can often be a saving grace aside from what the skimmer will do. It removes/lessens many of the toxin emitted by corals in defense of their surroundings.

Quote:
I realize that this thread is evolving into something other than my original coralline question. Sorry about that.
It has remained related to some degree

Cheers
Steve
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