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Old 09-09-2014, 11:03 AM   #31
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My worry stems from other threads where people mention that too much ammonia actually kills and inhibits the growth of nitrifying Bacteria, is that true?
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:07 AM   #32
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That is totally false. Ammonia is the food for bacteria. Nitrite is the byproduct when ammonia is consumed by one type of bb. Another type of bb consumes nitrite and the byproduct is nitrate. A sign that cycling is complete is when nitrite is totally consumed which is indicated by a very high nitrate and that's the time to do a water change until ammonia is gone.
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:09 AM   #33
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Okay thats a relief, Ill give you guys an update in a week!
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:55 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samtehbam View Post
My worry stems from other threads where people mention that too much ammonia actually kills and inhibits the growth of nitrifying Bacteria, is that true?
and if you read those threads further you will see that often they have a prolonged cycling period and often subsequent issues adding livestock.
The philosophy I have adopted for decades and has always worked is to purposely drive the ammonia up and force a huge BB colony to get established. Then when nutrient levels drop to normal for the tank, the BB don't die off, they go into "slo-mode" and as livestock is added the BB "wake-up" and can adjust much faster.
If a person does wc's throughout the cycle it is counter productive and ends up producing a mediocre population of BB and it can take an excruciatingly long time to get it completely balanced as they add livestock.
I read threads like that all the time here.

you should see about getting some seed materiel; a couple pounds of sand/gravel from an established tank or if possible purchase a couple pounds of "live rock" from the lfs.
It will speed things up considerably.

I want to point out one thing that I think has caused some confusion for folks from time to time.
The normal progression if no seeding media is used is that you see ammonia then nitrite and finally nitrate. In a "virgin" tank the tests will often follow that order with some overlap.
BUT
When using seeded media you are introducing all the types of BB at once and the result will be you will begin to get readings for all three right away.
I think that has caused some folks to think that the cycle is messed up, panic and do water changes when it is actually a good thing to see all three parameters rise early in the cycle.

BUT
if doing a fish-in cycle using seeded material it's even more imperative that you religiously test the water and keep the levels from getting too high because the fish will be dealing with the stress of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate simultaneously.
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Old 09-13-2014, 01:50 PM   #35
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Good news!!! PH 7.8 or 8, ammonia 8PPm, Nitrites 5.0ppm and Nitrates 160 ppm.
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Old 09-13-2014, 02:20 PM   #36
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If Nitrite drops a little bit you can remove shrimp and just lit it go down some more until it is close to zero then do a large water change. After that you can slowly add fish.
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:49 PM   #37
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PH 8 or 8.2, ammonia 8 ppm, Nitrite not 0 cant really ready it look lower then 1, and nitrate 160 ppm. THINGS ARE GOING GOOD!!
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Old 09-16-2014, 01:32 AM   #38
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The only problem is that no one knows how long the die off will last. Since your nitrite is going down your tank is now cycling. You can now do a large water change to get rid of those ammonia and nitrate.
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Old 09-30-2014, 11:45 PM   #39
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Sorry to just jump in but I also have a question about my cycling.
I'm 4 days in and these are my readings.
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I also put 2 raw shrimps in my tank (40gal). I also have some black mold looking stuff on my LV. Is that dead stuff that will eventually go away?



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Old 10-01-2014, 01:18 AM   #40
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Do you have cured live rocks and substrate? It seems too early to complete a cycle but your readings seem to indicate it is. If your nitrate keeps going up and nitrite stays where it is, then you can remove the shrimp and let ammonia go down. Assuming your readings are accurate then I'd say that at that point your tank is cycled. The pH is not imported for now.
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