Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater Reef Aquaria
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 07-13-2005, 04:18 PM   #11
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Tustin,Ca
Posts: 754
Quote:
about 15-20 gallons of water, 46G tank
That's a pretty big water change. Most do 15%-20%.
Quote:
Just add more coral to consume the CA
The more the merrier
__________________

__________________
Let's get a line wet!
got bait? is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2005, 04:30 PM   #12
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 248
Send a message via AIM to JohnNLuc
I have been adding corals like crazy in hopes to lower it but I see nothing so far. I guess i'll just keep adding.

As far as the water changes yes I know im going to be cutting back soon. I find no benefit in taking out so much water.
__________________

JohnNLuc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2005, 05:35 PM   #13
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: philadelphia. PA.
Posts: 2,679
IMO adding coral is not the the way to remedy this. Why add more animals to a tank w/ bad chemistry? Why continue using a salt mix that is so off? I think it would be wise to consider changing salts before adding more animals. High Ca is hard to deal with b/c their is no easy way to get it down. On the other hand, low Ca can be easily raised and balanced w/ alk(as is the case w/ IO salt). If you continue using this salt, every time you do a water change you will be screwing up the desired chemistry of the tank. IMO it would be wise to switch to a salt w/ chemisrty that is closer to NSW (or atleast a salt that can be easily balanced before use) while there is NOT allot of coral in the tank.
__________________
Mike
MT79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2005, 06:00 PM   #14
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 248
Send a message via AIM to JohnNLuc
Im going to switch my salt once this bucket is done with. I dare not ask what salt to switch to since I know how many different opinions everyone has. But I guess i'll move back to IO and take it from there.
JohnNLuc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2005, 06:07 PM   #15
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: philadelphia. PA.
Posts: 2,679
Quote:
I dare not ask what salt to switch to since I know how many different opinions everyone has.
I Agree! Which ever you choose, plan on sticking w/ it. FWIW, IO has been very good to me, but as said I bump the Ca up before using it. Good luck.
__________________
Mike
MT79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2005, 06:11 PM   #16
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 248
Send a message via AIM to JohnNLuc
I used IO for a little while than switched over to oceanic. I understand the whole "small water changes over a period of time" as to not cause shock to any of the fish, inverts or corals. Thanks though
JohnNLuc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2005, 06:48 PM   #17
steve-s
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnNLuc
My demand is not that great and would like to bring that CA number down to a normal 420 but with the oceanic I dont see how I can accomplish this. Any ideas?
If your Ca is 495 ppm out of the bucket, not much is going to change that. High demand will only mean more water changes or switching to a supplimentation scheme if weekly changes eventually do not keep up.

In the short term, your just going to have to deal with it as it is. As I said, 495 ppm Ca is not that great in terms of scleractinian health/growth formation. If you haven't got any, it won't be that much a concern except with snail longevity.

Cheers
Steve
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2005, 09:19 PM   #18
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 248
Send a message via AIM to JohnNLuc
I have no scleractinian which is a plus. And as far as snails I have not seen many deaths in fact I have seen a lot of baby snails in the tank due to reproducing. So once my oceanic bucket is empty im going to switch to a different salt and just suppliment both CA and ALK by dripping kalk or what not
JohnNLuc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2005, 12:00 AM   #19
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: edmonton
Posts: 685
I don't see anything wrong with higher ca if your tank uses it. I have used oceanic salt since I started in this hobby and I have seen nothing but growth from all my tank inhabitants. I have 3 shrimp and all of them are growing nicely. I have tested fresh mixed water and the ca is between 450 and 500 and the alk is about 2.6 meq/l. From what I understand when you raise your alk your ca will tend to come down a bit. I tested my ca 2 days after water change and it is down a bit. I use oceanic and am very pleased with it.
__________________
Edmonton Eskimo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2005, 05:03 PM   #20
steve-s
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Eskimo
I don't see anything wrong with higher ca if your tank uses it. I have used oceanic salt since I started in this hobby and I have seen nothing but growth from all my tank inhabitants. I have 3 shrimp and all of them are growing nicely. I have tested fresh mixed water and the ca is between 450 and 500 and the alk is about 2.6 meq/l.
Gotta disagree with that. Having high numbers just because the elements will "get used eventually" is no different than artificially boosting alk/Ca above NSW to force coral growth. The end result is still the same, increased depositing of CaCO3 as the scleractinians tries to gain equilibrium between the Ca in it's cells to that of the Ca in the surrounding water. To do so it must increase the rate in which carbonate and Ca deposit to the skelaton. In doing so the coral must also increase the rate of tissue growth which typically results in a very stressed and potentially unhealthy coral. Often being very brittle, malformed/reedy looking and easily sesceptible to problems.



Quote:
From what I understand when you raise your alk your ca will tend to come down a bit.
Depends on the product your using and what the levels of Mg are at the time. More often than not Ca will not decrease that much and simpley show a lower number due to abiotic precip of CaCO3 more than anything else. With the additions of buffers you are not seeing the whole effect as it is actually lowering both. Easily encrusted equipment (usually generating heat) is often a sign of this.

Quote:
I tested my ca 2 days after water change and it is down a bit. I use oceanic and am very pleased with it.
If you have that kind of a demand then that is a risk you choose to take. I do not think advising someone who has a completely different tank set up/stock type may be in their best interest?

Cheers
Steve
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
oceanic

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Those **** landscapers! Diablos Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 2 02-02-2007 08:24 PM
**** Anemone 2revup Saltwater Reef Aquaria 13 06-22-2006 05:03 PM
**** this thing. BOTLFED Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started 11 01-11-2005 01:59 AM
**** algae!!! greggsvt Saltwater Reef Aquaria 8 11-09-2004 11:21 AM
**** fungus! Robo Freshwater & Brackish - Unhealthy Fish 4 01-22-2004 07:41 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.