Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater Reef Aquaria
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 01-23-2011, 01:53 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
AdamHorton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 575
Do fish yawn?

I've noticed my fish doing something that looks just like yawning, but from what I know about humans yawning and how it regulates the pressure near their ears, I can't quite apply that to fish.

Are fish yawning, or are they doing something else when it looks like that?
__________________

__________________
-Adam Horton-
AdamHorton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2011, 02:30 PM   #2
SW REEF 18+ YEARS
Community Admin
 
melosu58's Avatar



Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 38,242
I have seen that also but I cant give you an answer as I really dont know. Sure looks like it though.
__________________

__________________

SITE ADMINISTRATOR

You can view many of my fish and corals in my photo albums in my profile.

View my tank


AA Community Rules|AA TOS

Forums 101 - posting, accounts, basics
melosu58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2011, 02:38 PM   #3
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Deep Seven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Van. Isl., BC Canada
Posts: 1,854
Depends on the fish. Some species of fish are filter feeders and flush extra water through their mouths to collect food, and that will look a lot like yawning. Water flow into the mouth and out through the gills is how most fish breath, so if they need extra oxygen they can flush extra water through their gills. This can allow them to "breath harder" without swimming faster. Fish consume more oxygen while digesting food, so this behavior could be more prevalent after feeding.

If the yawning is rapid, more like gasping, then they're probably having trouble breathing, either low oxygen, or something preventing the fish gills from working properly, ie.: high ammonia.


Edit:
Quote:
from what I know about humans yawning and how it regulates the pressure near their ears
Just some fun facts. I've heard yawning also cools the head a little bit from the evaporation in the mouth, and the slightly cooler temperature helps you think clearer. Also a good yawn helps replenish oxygen in the blood and that also helps you think clearer. When you see someone else yawn, your body/subconcious recognizes it, and stimulates a yawn so that you can also perform better at whatever activity you're engaged.
__________________
"The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing" A. Einstein
"Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."
"We can do anything we want to if we stick to it long enough." Helen Keller
Deep Seven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2011, 02:55 PM   #4
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
AdamHorton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 575
I notice it a lot in my Bangai Cardinals, damsels, and in some danios I have in my FW tank too. It's usually just one time and it doesn't seem like gasping. I'll try and see if it's more prevalent after feeding, but I usually feed my fish right before bed time so I'll probably never know.

Sounds like it serves similar effects to human yawning, just in different ways. Very interesting info. +Rep for you
__________________
-Adam Horton-
AdamHorton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2011, 03:34 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
thincat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,330
I think it's a sign of aggression. Me Bad!!! look how big my mouth is.LOL
__________________
Happy Reefing,
TC
thincat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2011, 08:32 PM   #6
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,462
Thincat, you are on the right track "Yawning" cues often depend on the current activity of a particular fish, but commonly represent a display of a fishes dominance territorially and/or in performance for a mate. In terms of increased oxygen, it is also theorized that "yawning" would reduce oxygenation so I think both sides of that fence are, well...on the fence. I personally believe that there are respiratory and digestive reasoning, often seeing fish "yawn" under stressful circumstances and after a large meal. Another variable would be the stretching of their jaw muscles, taking into consideration that food intake is a primary function utilizing just their jaws alone in order to consume food without chewing.
Innovator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2011, 08:42 PM   #7
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Crepe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 2,332
African cichlids do the same thing.
__________________
Crepe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2011, 01:09 AM   #8
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: not here anymore
Posts: 5,338
Funny... before I read very far, the thought going through my head was, "I wonder if he's talking about Bangaii's..." Yup, you were.

I've noticed the same thing with my Bangaii, and from what I've seen and read, I think like thincat and Innovator mentioned, it's a type of "bluff" - it's showing you who is top dog. My Bangaii will do it, often accompanied with that clicking/thumping noise they make. Hard to describe, but I'm guessing you've heard it since you have Bangaiis.
__________________
Kurt_Nelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2011, 08:28 AM   #9
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
AdamHorton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 575
I actually haven't heard the noise you're talking about. Maybe I should look (or listen) a little closer...

The one that I remember seeing was a male, and he was part of the pair that usually mate (in fact he's holding eggs right now). I don't know which of the mated pair really wears the pants, but I thought to myself that he could be stretching his jaw, so that makes sense.

As far as the damsels go, a display of intimidation would certainly go along with what I've seen.
__________________
-Adam Horton-
AdamHorton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2011, 11:24 AM   #10
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
rush's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 349
My antheas would do the same thing. It looks like they are yawning, but in fact they are just getting more oxygen, normally after they eat.
__________________

__________________
120 Gallon Reef

***Pics now on profile***
rush is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
2 foot Barramundi... Big yawn. ashdavid Show Off/Photography 3 12-13-2006 11:32 AM
Bloodworms for dinner?.....again?...yawn QTOFFER Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 29 02-05-2004 07:31 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.