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Old 10-28-2014, 02:09 PM   #21
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It's pretty simple physics. If more work is done it requires more energy and that energy creates waste heat.


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Old 10-28-2014, 03:18 PM   #22
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That is exactly what I said. Less water flowing less power.
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:35 PM   #23
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That is exactly what I said. Less water flowing less power.
no, not exactly.
If you are pumping the water through a restriction such as a fine filter media or a going from one diameter pipe/hose to a smaller diameter, than you have less water flow BUT the pump is working harder thereby producing more heat.

Like I said, it really depends on the application and if the pump is pushing or pulling the water.
So in a typical sump set-up the pump is pushing the water and the only restrictions will be head pressure and any flow restrictors/nozzles.

The difference is much more apparent in canister set-ups and is why they always have the pump after the canister pulling water, that way the pump is doing little work and the majority is done by gravity because the water always seeks it's own level.
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:36 PM   #24
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"What we got here is a failure to communicate."


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Old 10-28-2014, 03:40 PM   #25
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I recently changed some things on my DIY canister set-up that resulted in less flow restriction and much higher gph turnover through the pump and it runs much, much cooler with the higher flow rate/less restriction.
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:14 PM   #26
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I would say it depends on what type of motor driving the pump. The canister is designed to have the intake water level to be almost at the same level as the discharge. While the pump for the sump will require power related to the flow. Bear in mind the motor does not really maintain a constant speed but slows down when restricted. The best way to prove it is you take an infra red thermometer and measure the pump radiated heat.
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:40 PM   #27
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Jeff, I did that. As the motor is placed under higher loads (head pressure or restriction), it heats up accordingly. The coolest operating temperatures is when there is no head pressure. Lifting water equals work and work equals energy usage which in turn creates heat. Maybe we are saying the same thing.


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Old 10-29-2014, 04:26 AM   #28
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I think I've solved the issue at least for now. I turned off the heaters (2) and still had warm water. So after 1 night with the skimmer off I noticed some cooling water, back on the 79 mark, where I like it to bw actually. So I opened the pump of the Octopus skimmer and cleaned it with some pure vinegar and re assembled it. Worked like a jewel... but to be honest, I haven't seen anything blocking or clogging the pump. Now, anyway, problem is solved.
Thank you guys for all the info and discussion over the issue, I think I've learned a lot!

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Old 10-29-2014, 12:29 PM   #29
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I would say it depends on what type of motor driving the pump.
true, if you are talking about the difference between magnetic drive submersible pumps vs direct drive external pumps.
The direct drive pumps transmit virtually no heat and can pump a helluva lot more water at much greater head pressures, so those would be the best choice hands down. too bad they cost almost 4x as much $$$ and require more plumbing.


but as I was rolling this topic around my cranium I kept thinking of little "what if's" and "yeah but's" and came to the conclusion that my ideas sound logical, but I am far from an expert in fluid dynamics, so who knows....

at least it offers a little exercise for the ole' gray matter.
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Old 10-30-2014, 02:53 AM   #30
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I am glad that the OP has figured out what causing his tank temperature problem. However, I would like to clarify my stand which may help others with similar issue. The heat generated by pumps is simply caused by the electric current in its motor coil or winding. The more current, the more heat will be generated. The water flowing helps cool it down but it does not mean that it generates less heat. When less water is flowing, it just retain those heat within. The pump has to run at its optimum operation to reduce heat. We know that the more water flowing the more power is consumed and thereby more current is passing through the motor coil. Here is an excerpt from the link below if you really wanna know what is causing the abnormal heat on the pumps.

"Control the flow of the pump by slightly close the discharge valve till the pump operate at its best efficiency point."

Cause of pump overloading | Enggcyclopedia

.
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