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Old 05-12-2010, 12:19 PM   #231
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looks like the Hanna Nitrate is out and onsale
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Old 05-12-2010, 12:39 PM   #232
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Bavass, read carefully:"Measures between 0 to 30.0 mg/L. For Freshwater use only."
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Old 05-12-2010, 12:46 PM   #233
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thincat View Post
Bavass, read carefully:"Measures between 0 to 30.0 mg/L. For Freshwater use only."

doh!!! nice catch
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Old 05-12-2010, 12:58 PM   #234
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Yeah, I would hate for you to waste your money.
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Old 05-12-2010, 02:54 PM   #235
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Also, that's not one of the new $49.00 hand held colorimeters. That one has been out for quite some time.
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Old 05-12-2010, 03:55 PM   #236
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this what I just got from Hanna when I sent them an email about a Nitrate Checker

"Hi Brian,
I believe it’s on R&D’s project list, but I know that they’re currently working on the Checker HC for marine alkalinity and calcium. We just released ultra low range marine nitrite and phosphorous a few days ago. It’s my understanding that testing nitrate in salt water is a bit tricky using conventional reagents, and that they’re going to be looking at alternative chemicals to do the job. Would you like to be notified when we release new meters?

Regards,
Jessica"
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Old 05-12-2010, 07:56 PM   #237
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Ok so this is what I did. I lowered the powerheads and pointed them up towards the surface. I took the Rio 600 that I had along the back glass and replaced it with a 3rd Hydor 2 and pointed it up along the back glass towards the surface. I will do a water change of 10g tomorrow and continue that for 4 weeks and see if there is a diff. By the way the 3rd Hydor cuts off at night with the lights and the other 2 go into night mode from the wavemaker.
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Old 05-12-2010, 10:24 PM   #238
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Sounds good keep us posted
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Old 05-13-2010, 08:44 AM   #239
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The more I think about it the more I believe part of my problem is my high sump turnover rate. I have Mag Drive 7 running wide open. I think at the end of these 3 weeks if there is no difference in nitrates and algae I am going to replace the Mag 7 with a Mag 5 and put a ball valve in to allow more contact time with the skimmer and the de*nitrate reactor. Just seems to make sense that its easier to clean the water at a slower flow rate. Does that make sense to anybody else or am I just over thinking this problem?
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:37 AM   #240
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Turnover in the tank is a good thing. How is your skimmer being fed? Most use a pump (mine uses a Mag 9.5) therefore the return pump has no bearing. As for the De*Nitrate:

Fromthe SeaChem site:
Live” rocks or reef rocks remove nitrate by anaerobic denitrification. de nitrate™ removes nitrate by the same process. Efficiency is magnified several folds by forcing the water to filter through the porous de nitrate™. As with reef rock, anaerobic conditions are achieved by the porosity and the depletion of oxygen by the aerobic process at the surface. Excessive flow rates should, therefore, be avoided, as they may impede development of an adequate anaerobic environment to support denitrifying bacteria.
de nitrate™ is also an excellent media for aerobic nitrification and it makes an ideal biological filter in drip trays, canister filters, sumps, or even box filters. At high flow rates (greater than 100 US gallons per hour), it will function solely as an aerobic filter. At slow flow rates (less than 50 US gallons per hour), it will function as both an aerobic filter and an anaerobic denitrifying filter.
Directions
For best results, de*nitrate™ should be placed to assure the flow of water through it, such as in a canister filter, chemical filtration module, or box filter. Flow rate should not exceed 200 L (50 gallons*) per hour. If higher flow rates are unavoidable, use Matrix™ or Pond Matrix™. It is best to rinse off dust before use. Once de*nitrate™ has been in use for several days, nitrate concentrations should start to fall and level off gradually at a concentration of about 4–5 mg/L as nitrate. As long as nitrate concentrations remain under control, the product is not exhausted. Each 500 mL of de*nitrate™ treats about 100–200 L (25–50 gallons*), depending on initial nitrate concentration and the current biological load. Enough should be used to remove nitrate at a rate at least as fast as the rate of formation. If very high nitrates are initially present, they should be brought down to less than 20 mg/L with water changes.

So you may want to put it in canister and feed it via a seperate pump. I have some in my sump. It's just in a bag in between the baffles sitting on top of a poly filter. Guess I have too much flow for it be effective too <g>

Please keep us posted on your progress.
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