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Old 04-04-2007, 02:33 PM   #11
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Current 4 x 54W T-5 lights, and for ordering online isn't that the reason they have guarantees on the health of these corals?

I would imagine if it wasn't healthy during shipping and couldn't start working its way back to full health it would kick the can within 14 days right?
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Old 04-04-2007, 03:16 PM   #12
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IMO it's best to acclimate corals to your specific lights regardless of the lighting they came from. Corals will be stressed from the move either way and the lower light schedule for a couple of days won't hurt them.

Just reducing your regular lighting schedule by 2-4 hours for the first week or two is usually fine for PC/VHO but using the screen method is more important if using MH.
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Old 04-04-2007, 04:13 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by mdjxt39
I would imagine if it wasn't healthy during shipping and couldn't start working its way back to full health it would kick the can within 14 days right?
I suppose it all depends on how they/you define "kick the can." 14 days for fish is a pretty good time - and either a fish is alive or it isn't. A coral can hang on for quite a while before it's really "dead", well past the 14 day limit in my opinion.
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Old 04-04-2007, 10:20 PM   #14
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I disagree, per say, with corals not adding to your bioload. Your bioload is based on one's experience/capabilities, what is learned/utilized, selections of livestock, and the burden one puts on their system. Although fish probably comprise most of a system's bioload, corals do add to it through nutrient import/export, excretions (mucus), growth, competition, reproduction, and not to mention affected by virtually all environmental factors we must atone for.

In reference to the matter at hand, most corals become stressed during the shipping and handling procedures so you can assume they will mucus during acclimation (if you acclimate) and even after being introduced (in-tank acclimation) into the display. The mucus can affect other established corals as well as other new additions so you should choose wisely in how you plan to stock. C. jardinei, Elegance Coral, have been rather sensitive over the past years and usually succumb to infection so it would be wise to attempt this coral once experience has been planted and a well established aquarium has been grown. Multiple corals can be added at a single time successfully, just as long as you understand the needs of said coral(s) and a system's balance is maintained.
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Old 04-05-2007, 12:44 AM   #15
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Bio-load = ammonia produced from the waste of fish and other livestock, foods, and decomposing organic animal and plant matter. So as for increasing the bio-load I would say that the don't not like a fish, shrimp or crab. Now as was stated that they increase bio-"demand" yes they do require addition experience, time, money, patients and ability!
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Old 04-05-2007, 12:53 AM   #16
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Bio-load = ammonia produced from the waste of fish and other livestock, foods, and decomposing organic animal and plant matter.
There are different sets of adopted definitions for bioload and personally I believe it's made up of more than just how much ammonia is produced in a given system.
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Old 04-05-2007, 01:31 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Innovator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziggy953
Bio-load = ammonia produced from the waste of fish and other livestock, foods, and decomposing organic animal and plant matter.
There are different sets of adopted definitions for bioload and personally I believe it's made up of more than just how much ammonia is produced in a given system.
I agree, any chance you can elaborate (I'm still learning and looking to get into corals within the next 3 weeks)?
BTW, it's good to have you back, Innovator.
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Old 04-05-2007, 01:40 AM   #18
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I'm not disagreeing with you, but I think something other then the term "bioload" shoudl be applied to what you are talking about...The definition I gave is the text book definition which directly relates to the question asked. When we talk about the bioload of our systems we are talking about the amount of ammonia produced and nullified within the system...I equate what you are talking about as the "bio-demand" of the system...what it takes to maintain and grow the system....
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Old 04-05-2007, 02:20 AM   #19
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The bioload is your system as a whole and is all relative, really. Whether you put a fish or a coral into a given system it requires specific care in order for that animal to grow and hopefully reproduce in one fashion or another. The care requirements add to the systems bioload. For example, you purchase a Euphyliid (Frogspawn, Hammer, Torch, whatever) and it requires adequate lighting (symbiotic), which in turn "burns energy" in order to grow/reproduce. Growth and reproduction take up valuable real estate, food intake, waste management, and leads to competition amongst corals. The bioload increases due to cause and effect, one way or another, and how the system handles the changes is largely based upon knowledge of the keeper and how that knowledge is utilized.
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Old 04-05-2007, 12:06 PM   #20
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I agree with what you are saying, Innovator but I also see bioload as Ziggy said, and our system's ability to get rid of ammonia. I like the term "bio-demand". Maybe we can stir some waters in the hobby.

But if your system is aged enough to take care of corals, meaning you do all the neccesary reserach beforehand and stuff, have adequate lighting and filtration, you shouldn't have to worry about the bioload of corals, because it seems like it would be minimal in the grand scheme of things. I dunno, just thinking out loud here.

Good to see you back, btw!
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