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Old 08-09-2005, 09:53 AM   #1
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Isopods and bottom dwelling fish!?

I have been reading a lot about Isopods after finding some in my Nano attached to my Yellow Clown Goby.
From what I have been reading ... I see that usually bottom dwelling fish and slow moving larger fish are more prone to the Isopods latching on and slowly draining them of life!
I have also read that if you keep the tank fallow for 3-6 months they will starve and die off.

Questions ...

1. Would faster moving fish mid to top tank dwellers be just as prone to the Isopods or not?

2. If your feeding the tank, because of corals ... wouldn't the Isopods then have a source of food ... or do they primarily live off of fish?

3. Do the Isopods attack corals as well or just fish?
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Old 08-09-2005, 12:10 PM   #2
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Re: Isopods and bottom dwelling fish!?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jermz79
Questions ...

1. Would faster moving fish mid to top tank dwellers be just as prone to the Isopods or not?
Actually it's fish that dwell within the rock structure at night when they sleep that are the most prone. Very few fish are out in the open after lights out (sun down). This makes them a much easier target for the isopod. Daytime movements are not the only consideration and probabley of lesser concern.

Quote:
2. If your feeding the tank, because of corals ... wouldn't the Isopods then have a source of food ... or do they primarily live off of fish?....I have also read that if you keep the tank fallow for 3-6 months they will starve and die off.
There are many species of isopod and quite a few are merely detritus consumers. Few in fact are parasitic at all. Anything that creates waste and/or adds nutrient to the tank would be a source of food. You would actually need to leave the tank fallow for close to a year to be rid of a parasitic species. They can/will survive on the detritus alone for a good while but they do need a host to survive long term.

Quote:
3. Do the Isopods attack corals as well or just fish?
Depends on the species of isopod but fish are not the only prey. They will also attack/feed on crustaceans. Corals are not a concern.

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Steve
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Old 08-09-2005, 12:40 PM   #3
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I'm refering to Cirolanoid Isopods ... the ones that attach to the fish and suck the blood.

OK so ......

Basically the only way to ever get rid of Ciralanoid Isopods is to Beak down the tank and start over huh? But the chances of re-introducing the Isopod are 50/50 ... either it will be there or not!

This is becoming very frustrating, every place has a different answer ... some say 3 months, some say 6, steve-s you say a year 8O , some say tear it down, some say use a sacrificial fish (which is what I'm about to do), some say don't keep fish (where's the fun in that) .... it's all a tad bit confusing!!!!
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Old 08-09-2005, 01:29 PM   #4
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from what i have read, if you break down you use new stuff...

unless you wanted to take the LR and LS out and get some interceptor (heart worm meds for dogs) to dose your sand and rock to try and kill them...

I have found one in my overflow, and removed it, and continued to monitor at night, when they are supposed to be active, and have yet to see any...

I will be adding some fish soon, so I will definitly be on the look out... if I do have issues after the fish... i will remove fish and inverts to a smaller tank to dose with interceptor and recycle my tank...
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75g w/ 30g sump, 160# LR, 60# sand: Inverts =18 turbos, 30 nassirus's, 40 blue leg's, 5 emeralds, 1 CBS, 1 skunk cleaner, 1 brown gulf shrimp? and various other LR hitch hikers yet un discovered or un-ID'ed
Fish=1 yellow tang, 1 yellow headed jawfish, 1 pink/blue shrimpgoby, 2 perc clowns.
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Old 08-09-2005, 04:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jermz79
Basically the only way to ever get rid of Ciralanoid Isopods is to Beak down the tank and start over huh? But the chances of re-introducing the Isopod are 50/50 ... either it will be there or not!
There is always a chance you will introduce an unwanted organism to the tank. The chances for isopods are no different. As far as tearing down the tank, I think that's rather extreme. They can be caught usually quite quickly with a net or by removing the rock they are known to hide in.

Quote:
This is becoming very frustrating, every place has a different answer ... some say 3 months, some say 6, steve-s you say a year 8O , some say tear it down, some say use a sacrificial fish (which is what I'm about to do), some say don't keep fish (where's the fun in that) .... it's all a tad bit confusing!!!!
See if this helps some....
http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2002-05/rs/index.php

Cheers
Steve
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Old 08-09-2005, 04:28 PM   #6
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Yeah I've read that atrticle over and over again ...

I guess I may have to bite the bullet and remove the rock, but if there living in the sand then that's a whole other issue!!!!! AHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!

I may have to resort to a sacrificial fish. I know I know some here may not like that idea. But come on what is one to do ... I figure if I can catch them on the fish, remove them and throw the fish back in it's better than the alternative of no fish for a year!!!!!!!!! Or worse yet completely breaking the tank down!!!
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Old 08-09-2005, 04:39 PM   #7
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I think you may be taking this in the wrong direction my friend. In an established tank they can be somewhat of a PITA. In a newer tank, especially one with no fish in it, what's the rush?

Bide your time and check after lights out for it's normal activities. Even try setting baited traps with small pieces of inverted bottle/nylon stocking.

Extreme measures are not going to solve your dilema, they will just add to them.

Cheers
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Old 08-09-2005, 04:46 PM   #8
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The thing is ... I have them in my 29gal too, but have never seen them actually attached to a fish. I just leave them be because they seem to be cleaning the nasty stuff up! I figure they must be the good ones.

But in my Nano, they were actually attached to the Clown Goby, and since I removed him ... I have not seen any. The worst part is the bad ones look so much like the good ones it's hard to tell!!!!
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Old 08-09-2005, 05:00 PM   #9
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Please post a clear pic if you end up catching one. Most will more commonly be Sphaeromatids and not a concern. They are quite similar in appearance and often mistaken as Cirolanids. Look for ideantifying traits, especially in the posterior region.

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Old 08-09-2005, 05:09 PM   #10
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Well there is really no question in my mind that my Nano has the Cirolanids, they were attached to the fish. Sphaeromatids are generally found grazing the sand and what not eating detrius.

I also see the difference between the ones in my Nano like you said by the posterior region, the Sphaeromatids have little fins kind of like an old cadillac and the Cirolanids are generally more oval shaped with no little fins!

So you say bait a inverted bottle with little pieces of food and use that to catch them??? That works?


Thanks steve-s I know it seems as though I may sound redundant, but I'm starting to get annoyed and definitely not with you!!!
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