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Old 05-25-2013, 10:51 AM   #21
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I don't trust LFS RO/DI water. They are in business to make money...nothing wrong with that, but it leads to compromising decisions in a down economy that leads you to believe you are getting good RO/DI water when in reality you end up with crap that may not be much better than that which comes out of your tap-- because they may not go to the necessary expense of replacing the pads when they should. I wouldn't use any RO/DI water without a TDS reading first.

LFS RO/DI water has become popular because it is an easy money maker on their part. They are betting that most people don't want to pony up $200 for an RO/DI unit and would much rather make it a part of a routine purchase. Buyer beware with this. TDS meters can be had for $30 and gives you piece of mind that you are buying what they are advertising.
+1 The salinity of their saltwater is usually way below like 1.020 and you end up adding more salt to conform with your tank salinity.
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:49 PM   #22
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What should I keep it around? I just got all of the stuff and the hydrometer has a "safe zone" but what should it really be at
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:53 PM   #23
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The hydrometer has a "safe zone" but what should it really be at
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:54 PM   #24
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For new tank it is not that critical. You can start at any salinity you prefer but for fish only the green indicator is good (1.020). You can crank it up later when adding corals but very slowly.
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Old 05-25-2013, 05:11 PM   #25
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Ok thanks
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Old 05-25-2013, 09:18 PM   #26
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it should be at 1.026
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Old 05-25-2013, 10:14 PM   #27
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Ok I just setup the tank and its around 1.023. I don't know if it effects the salinity but the tank really murky.
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Old 05-25-2013, 11:13 PM   #28
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I'm not sure if you are familiar on how to cycle a new salt water tank but it will take a lot of patience. That murky water is not unusual. You need to wait for probably 3 weeks before you can put fish in your tank. That is after the Nitrogen Cycle is completed. Search for how to cycle the tank.
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Old 05-26-2013, 10:00 AM   #29
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Ammonia to nitrite to nitrate then your cycles over. Right?
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Old 05-26-2013, 11:09 AM   #30
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Ammonia to nitrite to nitrate then your cycles over. Right?
The Nitrogen Cycle does not happen only once. It is a continuous process but the first cycle of a new tank is very critical cause it has to start with lots of toxins which are the 3 you mentioned. Once there is enough bacteria, nitrite will go down with nitrate as the byproduct. Changing water is the simplest way to get rid of nitrate. That is why you need lots of ammonia at the beginning so it will create enough bacteria. The quickest way is to put a shrimp inside the tank to rotten for a week enclosed in a nylon panty hose or similar. Another way but will take a little bit longer is to put very hardy fish like damsels to have their waste form into ammonia.
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