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Old 10-04-2012, 07:48 PM   #11
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Sorry if that post came off wrong but your post sounded like you just don't care. Hard to read things over the Internet.
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Old 10-04-2012, 07:52 PM   #12
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That response is very irresponsible in my opinion. They need to be men and bare the parameter changes your water will go through? What about your fish? They should "man up" also?

How about you "man up" and take responsibility for actions and do the proper research and the right thing while your tank cycles.
You ahould watch Desert Seas with David Attenborough. Look at how the corals in the MENA region adapted!
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Old 10-04-2012, 08:38 PM   #13
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They do have products out there to help push your cycle along a little faster..
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Old 10-04-2012, 09:01 PM   #14
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Key to this hobby is patience I learned the hard way. Wait 4 to 6 weeks when your water test is good start adding slow.the coral will not man up it will die and you lose money.a region is a lot larger than our little fish bowls they are living animals!
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Old 10-04-2012, 09:08 PM   #15
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I agree how would you like it if I locked you up in a closet and filled it full of smoke. I don't think you lungs would be to happy to breath that in. You are essentially doing this to your livestock. Talk to the fish store and see if they can at least hold on to the livestock till cycling is completed. It's the nicest "man up" thing to do.
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Old 10-04-2012, 09:08 PM   #16
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Sell them off or somehow return them. They WILL die if ammonia rises. Your fish can hide and die where they hide and release even more ammonia from the decay, and of course you won't be there to clean it up right away. This is an enclosed aquarium, it is not the wild that has unlimited resources and usually constant parameters. Putting your corals through a cycle is something they CANNOT endure. Many people have made the mistake of putting in livestock before it cycles, I don't think you'll be an exception. :L
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Old 10-04-2012, 09:14 PM   #17
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Soooo.... The tanks not cycled..... And it looks like you have standard t8 lights..... Meaning..... Everything will die. Return all of them. During the cycle your not supposed to have anything but rock and sand. Do some research before jumping the gun.
Wrong on both counts; obviously the lighting is more than enough to support the corals and so long as the cycling is done correctly, nothing is going to die.

Gazwaz, while not the best thing to do, it is completely possible to finish your cycle with the corals you currently have in the tank. Please read through the following thread on soft cycling and follow the directions as given;

Soft Cycling the Saltwater Aquarium

So long as you keep the ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates below the toxic level your corals will be fine. It probably would be best to return the fish if possible, but if not, if you follow the directions to a perfection, it also will survive the cycling process.

Avoid dosing with Purple-up period. It is nothing but a calcium supplement and while the extra calcium may increase coralline growth, it will also throw you calcium levels in the tank out of whack! Maintaining proper chemical levels using a good quality test kit will promote more than enough coralline growth. Soon enough you will be complaining about having to scrap it off the walls so you can see in your aquarium.
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Old 10-04-2012, 09:20 PM   #18
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Key to this hobby is patience I learned the hard way. Wait 4 to 6 weeks when your water test is good start adding slow.the coral will not man up it will die and you lose money.a region is a lot larger than our little fish bowls they are living animals!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crystal A View Post
I agree how would you like it if I locked you up in a closet and filled it full of smoke. I don't think you lungs would be to happy to breath that in. You are essentially doing this to your livestock. Talk to the fish store and see if they can at least hold on to the livestock till cycling is completed. It's the nicest "man up" thing to do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by obscurereef View Post
Sell them off or somehow return them. They WILL die if ammonia rises. Your fish can hide and die where they hide and release even more ammonia from the decay, and of course you won't be there to clean it up right away. This is an enclosed aquarium, it is not the wild that has unlimited resources and usually constant parameters. Putting your corals through a cycle is something they CANNOT endure. Many people have made the mistake of putting in livestock before it cycles, I don't think you'll be an exception. :L
I'm going to suggest, politely, that you all need to educate yourself a little further and step down off your high horses. Please take the time to read through the following threads;

Soft Cycling the Saltwater Aquarium

A friendly reminder about tact

while this may not be the best or most recommended course of action, it is completely doable. The "myth" that any aquarium cannot be cycled with livestock in a safe and humane manner is just that, a myth! So take the time to help someone out rather than being a negative Ned/Nellie and driving members away from the forum.
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