Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater Reef Aquaria
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 05-05-2011, 05:37 AM   #51
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by yetee
I am betting that removing it will help. you can use live rock rubble in the sump.
Yeah I will remove it, I have a load of rubble in there already, I just thought the driftwood might help even more, I may have been wrong!
__________________

__________________
Sebastian_Troy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2011, 05:43 AM   #52
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by redfisher1139
How big is the piece of driftwood, because, yes that may be a contributer. I use driftwood in my FW as a means to lower my ph to 6.8 without having to go the peat route.
It's an awesome piece of heartwood from a gnarled piece of mangrove root, about 1.5 feet long and at most 1 inch diameter, so not a huge piece of root, pH chemistry seems to have a few strange differences between SW and FW, but yeah it might help, thanks
__________________

__________________
Sebastian_Troy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2011, 05:43 AM   #53
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: UK
Posts: 43
I am quite new to all this, so feel free to judge my observations with that in mind.

I had real problems with pH in the first few weeks of setting up my marine tank - well I thought I had problems with the pH, what I really had problems with was reading the pH test kit results.

Test kit 1 = Red Sea Marine Lab pH results gave a colour which didnt match anything on the result chart - ever, still doesnt. We had people over one weekend and all eight of us agreed that the colour in the tube just didnt look remotely like anything on the chart. This test kit was completely unreadable for me.

Test kit 2 - Done by the LFS (sorry no idea what test he used) showed the pH at 7.7. He did say that the pH of the sample would not be the same as the pH of the tank, since the sample had been in a bottle with no water circulation for some time prior to testing.

Test kit 3 = eSHa Aqua Test (dip stick) cheap, cheap, cheap and I got what I paid for! All the colours of the different dip stick test pads ran into each other so not one of them matched anything on the test chart . Poor test design and poor testing procedure on my part.

Test kit 4 = (I threw the box away, so can't find the brand name, I will hunt it out) was really easy to use and really easy to read ie different pH levels have completely different colours instead of 100 shades of green, meaning no debate about results. It showed a tank pH of 7.9.

I used Seachem buffer once, altered my powerhead to increase surface flow and my pH has settled at 8.3 since then with no fluctuation.

My only other observation on pH was an experiment we did on some RO water we had in a stored in a sealed container for a couple of days. We opened the container and tested the pH = 7.7 then rocked the container back and forth for 5 minutes, retested pH = 8.1, quite a difference when the only changing parameter was water movement.

Goodluck in solving this mystery, I'm sure you will get there.
__________________
Ethreal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2011, 05:56 PM   #54
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Gregcoyote's Avatar



Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Columbia, Missouri
Posts: 8,325
I gave up on chemical test kits for Ph years ago and bought a inexpensive Ph meter on EBay, along with Ph 7 and Ph 10 calibration solutions. I highly recommend this as with proper calibration, you will get accurate results every time. The chemical test kits don't account for temperature of the test water, where most probes do.
__________________
Gregcoyote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2011, 05:47 AM   #55
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 38
So this pH meter, prices? Have you spent more on it and solutions then you would have for test kits?
__________________
Sebastian_Troy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2011, 08:19 AM   #56
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: UK
Posts: 43
I would be really interested to know which meter you use.
__________________
Ethreal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2011, 03:11 PM   #57
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Gregcoyote's Avatar



Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Columbia, Missouri
Posts: 8,325
Mine is a Hanna that I paid $35 for. The test solutions cost another $10. More than a chemical test kit, but not that much. And far more accurate and easy to use in my opinion.
__________________
Gregcoyote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2011, 05:34 AM   #58
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 38
Well I guess that lasts a lot longer than any chemical test kit, so it works out cheaper in the end???

Also I've removed the drift wood, and after an initial slight rise in pH it's plummeted again D: I have been adding reef buffer daily, I added some to a small cup and the parameters instantly magically levelled out to their correct levels, but in the tank something is just reacting with all of it, all I have in there now is aragonite sand, live rock, equipment and my homemade rock, which I made **** well sure (easily over more than a year) that it was cured completely!
__________________
Sebastian_Troy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2011, 12:40 PM   #59
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
RYANLAWRENCE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Lone Star State
Posts: 315
The only thing that I can think of is that is is your homemade rock. All of the other stuff should buffer your pH. Even if you think your homemade rock is made out of the right materials, it has to be reacting somehow
__________________
40 gallon FOWLR
-2 ocellaris clowns (mated pair)
-1 diadem pseudochromis
-1 flame hawkfish
RYANLAWRENCE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2011, 01:20 PM   #60
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
krap101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Roscoe, IL
Posts: 6,084
Send a message via AIM to krap101
The weird thing is the aragonite should be raising your pH and hardness... and the two things that I can think of that can lower pH is co2 and driftwood (peat etc). But I'm a freshie...
__________________

__________________
~ Danny
krap101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PH dropping BrianGray Freshwater & Brackish - Unhealthy Fish 6 08-25-2010 10:35 PM
just dropping by to say... hollywoodheidi Member Introductions 4 10-21-2007 10:45 PM
just dropping by to say... hollywoodheidi Member Introductions 8 10-20-2007 10:31 PM
I have not been dropping by too much lately but... DragonForce Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started 10 01-25-2006 09:21 PM
Why is my Kh dropping? fastfly48 Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 7 12-08-2005 12:22 AM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.