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Old 05-19-2013, 01:23 AM   #1
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Preferred Testing Method

Howdy So many times as I read thru the threads the question "What's your pH at?" "What is ammonia reading so far?" A lot hinges on these test results. They literally can be life or death. I use the same kit my LFS (<- look I'm catching on) uses. I use an API Master Test Kit. It tests pH, Ammonia, Nitrite, and Nitrate. It has droppers, test tubes, and a color chart. I'll include a pic. Am I going the good route? Should I have more than 4 things to test for? If not what's suggested?
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Old 05-19-2013, 01:51 AM   #2
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PH at 8.00 is acceptable for salt water but reef tank usually prefers a little bit higher. Most would prefer between 8.2 to 8.4 if you have corals. Your Ammonia which is between 0.5 and1.0 is pretty bad. It should be close to 0. Although your nitrite and nitrate are good, it tells me your tank has not fully cycled or not enough good bacteria to convert ammonia to less toxic element such as (nitrate).
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Old 05-19-2013, 02:06 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by jeffaquarius View Post
PH at 8.00 is acceptable for salt water but reef tank usually prefers a little bit higher. Most would prefer between 8.2 to 8.4 if you have corals. Your Ammonia which is between 0.5 and1.0 is pretty bad. It must be close to 0. Although your nitrite and nitrate are good, it tells me your tank has not fully cycled or not enough good bacteria to convert ammonia to less toxic element such as (nitrate).
thank you for the reading it was a bad testing I know. That was before I had a skimmer and then carbon bag filter. And the issue is the bacterias. But is this kit a suitable kit and should I be testing for other things? I've been asked about my calcium level and the copper. Makes me believe I need to be testing for those as well. I did get the water tested at LFS each time before buying any critters.
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Old 05-19-2013, 02:15 AM   #4
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This was last test
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Old 05-19-2013, 02:15 AM   #5
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You need to have Alkalinity (KH), Calcium, Phosphate, Magnesium and Strontom
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