Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater Reef Aquaria
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 02-16-2006, 10:26 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ohio
Posts: 30
Red Slime tank in distress Please help

I have had an active tank for about 6 months now, and i began to see a purple coating coating everything in my tank, i mistaknely thought it was corline algie, but after battleing this stuff for a while i finaly was able to descripe this stuff to a person at my lfs, and they said it was red slime. so i purchaced some formula to remove red slime. i after that i did an intenet search and learned more about red slime. and discovered it is not realy that bad for the fish but it makes your tank look bad, -- well to make a long story short, after i eraticated the red slime i noticed most of my live rock was bleach white, i then realised that my benificial bacteria must have been killed with the red slime. the next day i tested my water and found high amounts of amonia .75 ppm so as a panic situation i changed out 14 gal of water my tank is a 65 gal tank. as another emergency measure i put 118 ml of cycle in the tank to get some bacteria back into action, and i also used a product called ammo lock. it is now 3 days later and my ammonia is still at .75 and brown bacteria is coating my lr.
- i only use ro water
- the fish are not showing signs of stress that i can tell.
hiding, darting, not eating.

Critters"
foxface rabbit fish
yellow tail tang
yellow tang
Seahorse
feather duster
coral start.

stats are as follows

sg 1.022
no2 <.1 ppm
ph 8.1
no3 10 ppm
ammonia .75 ppm
1.) has anyone had any expeience with ammo lock, and how often should i use it. at best i found the instructions veague about continued use untill the tank is fixed. the insert said it will work upto 3ppm.

2.) What else should i do to get this fixed asap.
3.) any advice will be helpfull.
__________________

__________________
zapdbf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 02:15 AM   #2
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
Ammo lock is just a temporary fix. It does not remove ammonia, but instead seals the toxicity of it. It is recommended to do a water change after two applications (should state this right on the bottle). The ammonia molecules will be released, so instead of using Ammo lock, just use bio suppliments like Cycle or better yet...NitroMax Marine. Keep up on small but frequent water changes till the ammonia and nitrite are back at zero.

Red Slime is cyanobacteria. Though harmless to fish, it can harm corals, especially stony coral.
__________________

__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 10:23 AM   #3
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ohio
Posts: 30
well, yes ammo lock is, but if you need to react to a potental disaster i feel it is a good thing, definately not perfict, but if it will keep my fish from expiring i will do everything i can. i just don;t know how long i should wait between doses untill i get this thing under control, i will probibly continue to use it untill the amonia drops down. unless anyone can give me a good reason not to use it.
__________________
zapdbf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 10:33 AM   #4
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 7,224
Send a message via Yahoo to Hara
You should be doing a LARGE (50%) water change followed by daily water changes of 30% until the ammonia is completely gone. The reason you are experiencing this high ammonia rate is indeed, the cyano was treated with an antibiotic, which is indiscriminate in the bacteria that it kills, both good and bad were removed and you are correct in the assumption your liverock is now not very effective. This is the problem with using chemical fixes that LFS people send your way. I would be using the water changes as your means of dealing with the problem. Just because you do not see fish dieing today, does not mean that they have not bee affected by the ammonia. You must just hope for the best.

As a side note, I must say that you should consider removing that seahorse from the tank after this is all said and done. The environment is less than optimum in its conditions.
__________________
Hara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 12:52 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ohio
Posts: 30
"As a side note, I must say that you should consider removing that seahorse from the tank after this is all said and done. The environment is less than optimum in its conditions."

-- Why, do you think that the tank will no longer be right for inverts?
what do i need to consiter to get my tank right again.

if my tank has no ammo, no no2's and no no3's, no copper, -- what else do i need to
consiter when housing inverts.

My first set-up crashed in about july of last year, lost all of my fish and i don;t know why.

this time since about nov (when i set it up new again) i have been dilligent about my water condition, testing qt tank ect ... everything was great untill the cayno issue. i think that the cayno killed off the bacteria and the cayno was supporting my tank, and when i killed off the cayno i then lost any bio filtration i had.

So far as of this morning everybody seems fine. but that could change in an instant.

this weekend i will keep to the advice and do a 30 gal change. hopefully that will help fix this. -- now that leads me into another problem -- i don't have that much aged salt water.
so i iwll mix the salt in a jug and then put it in the tank quickly, how dammaging is that to my fish ?
Will it come down to the lesser of two evils ammo or non aged salt ?

If anyone has comments or experience with the ammo lock product any input about this would be very helpfull, i realize it is not the best thing, but when you see a potential diszaster you want to react quicly.
__________________
zapdbf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 01:36 PM   #6
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 7,224
Send a message via Yahoo to Hara
Quote:
"As a side note, I must say that you should consider removing that seahorse from the tank after this is all said and done. The environment is less than optimum in its conditions."

-- Why, do you think that the tank will no longer be right for inverts?
what do i need to consiter to get my tank right again.
A seahorse is a FISH not an invert.

It is a fish with very unique needs, none of which you have met

You need to do what you can as far as salt. Start mixing and aging now, do not add freshly mixed salt water to the tank. I cannot comment on the ammo lock, I don't use it.
__________________
Hara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 02:47 PM   #7
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ohio
Posts: 30
what ever i need for this kind of fish i want to do it, what are the conditions that i need to meet?
__________________
zapdbf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 03:58 PM   #8
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 7,224
Send a message via Yahoo to Hara
For one thing, they need to be in a tank without other active fish that will out compete them for food. It needs to be in a species only tank, low flow, pristine water conditions and fed several times daily.
__________________
Hara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 08:55 PM   #9
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
Ammo Lock has the benefit of being an emergency additive to lock the toxicity of ammonia away from the fish. The ammonia molecule is sealed. The recommendation for a water change after two doses is because the molecule will be released back to it's toxic state. It doesn't seal it indefinitely. It's only temporary.

Bio additives such as Cycle and NitroMax will actually eat ammonia (and nitrites) until the system's bio can recover. Less room for a surprise spike in ammonia.

Using the two combined would proabaly insure more protection overall.

Seahorses are very fragile and for the sake of the wild populations of seahorses, purchase captive bred only unless you intend to breed for conservation purposes. Seahorse populations are under serious threat.

Seahorses should be the most aggressive animal in the tank. A pristine and mature reef system is what they need. Low light...nice macro algae to hide in and hold. There are low light and non photosynthetic coral that can be housed in a seahorse tank. I would recommend a refugium filter over a skimmer. Makes nicer natural growth and can help produce enough copepods for the seahorses to eat once in awhile. Most seahorses only accept live food. Once in a while you might find one that will accept frozen, but be prepared to have a reliable source for live brine and ghost shrimp.

Definitely read up on seahorses before obtaining them.
__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 09:23 PM   #10
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Poughkeepsie, NY
Posts: 3,294
Cyno does not kill off bacteria... How old is this tank and what size is it?
What kind of water are you using?

the seahorse needs to go if you want it to live long term. They are very delicate critters and need there own tank like the others said.
Adding chems to a tank is a quick fix or bandaid, not a cure to the problem.

Keep testing your water for ammonia.
Read up on cyno bacteria needs phosphates, low flow, old light bulbs to grow. Have you ever tested you water for PO4? if so what are the readings.

read , read and then read some more on the hobby.. Cutting corners is only going to cost you more money in the long run and most LFS do not know what their talking about. We are not after your money here like the LFS, we are trying to give you advice to have a healthy and happy tank.
__________________

__________________
9/02-125 REEF, 125 lbs LR,LS 4x160 VHO, Reef Devil /Sump, Fuge
7/03-55 FOWLR 60lb LR, 50 lb SD sand 2x40 NO strip light, Reef Devil/sump, Fuge

TANK PICS http://www.aquariumadvice.com/viewtopic.php?t=98202
seaham358 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
red slime, slime, stress, tan

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help with Red Slime weemanpow3 Saltwater Reef Aquaria 5 08-09-2007 04:17 PM
Red Slime Help Brodie Saltwater Reef Aquaria 2 09-20-2005 07:44 PM
Best way to rid your tank of RED SLIME? Pics Enclosed gump3842k Saltwater Reef Aquaria 2 08-09-2004 02:18 PM
Has Anoyone used this for Red Algae? ULTRALIFE RED SLIME RubixCube Saltwater Reef Aquaria 1 01-22-2004 12:04 AM
Red Slime? AngelFish_03 Saltwater Reef Aquaria 2 10-13-2003 01:13 AM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.