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Old 04-11-2007, 03:27 AM   #1
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Reef keeping and the impact it does?

hi i wanted to get other people veiws on this subject.

I been doin alot of research on the inernet and have found many sites that blame the marine aquarist along with the global warmin and the mining of limestone for the depleation of the worlds Reefs. now i am not one for global warming. but thats not what caught my eye. i pondered on the idea of aquarist being the blame for the decline of our reefs. and wanted to know how other people felt about that? or even if they think its true. and also what could we do to mabey help. please chime in. i am very intrested about this and want to know more. so if any one has any infomation pls share
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Old 04-11-2007, 03:46 AM   #2
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According to just about everything I've read, it is a real contributor to reef destruction. Besides directly removing some animals, some methods of collection are destructive to the animals left behind as well. The SW hobby is pretty popular, and the numbers are growing. Just 20 years ago, or so, reefs w/ the diversity of coral kept now were unimaginable. People used to consider Goniopora corals hardy. It was only later realized it just takes them longer to die than most corals. (Ironically, Goni's still are difficult to keep, long term, today) W/ success comes popularity. The rising demand for reef animals, compounded by GW'ing, and sediment run off from deforestation and destructive farming practices is taking a toll on reefs, and most likely will continue to. It's estimated by ~2020 that 60% of all reefs could be gone. Approx. 16% are bleached as of now, and many more in danger. Buying aquacultured, maricultured, tank raised, and fragging your own, corals is a responsible thing to do. It has many benefits. It's always good when your tank starts paying for itself, or you can help out a fellow reefer by giving them a good deal on a frag.
Just my .02
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Old 04-11-2007, 04:53 AM   #3
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I think that the fact that Aquaculturing and maricultring are growing in popularity in our hobby shows that many of us are enviromentally contious. The factors that MT listed are true, the GBR is shrinking in areas and growing by leaps and bounds in others.

If you wonder about mans influence on the destruction of the reef (GBR in particular) have a look at the result of heavy farming in Australia. All the excess nutrient pumped into the ocean created algae, which in turn allowed a nasty starfish to thrive, the crown of thorwns star, which is a coral killer. It destroys everything in it's path, and can be directly linked to the increase in nutrients/algae in and around the GBR. I think that our hobby is a part of the global reef problem but only a small part. Most of us that have reef tanks are interested in conservation and want to see our natural reefs protected!

I'm all for the aquacultured frag! Get those porp tanks going and grow your own. Keep our natural reefs exactly that, natural. Though I think it wll require much much more then us hobbyist growing our own corals to really turn things around.

Another $.02 worth....
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Old 04-11-2007, 06:24 AM   #4
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WOW.
Priceless
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Old 04-11-2007, 09:46 AM   #5
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Great info guys and I've read similar as far as deforestation and destructive farming practices along with the crown of thorns Sea Star (which can move up to 20 miles per hour ).

Even as our hobby is growing actual "reef keepers" still only make up a very small percentage of all SW tanks so our blame is more limited then other factors and as more people get into aqua culturing and tank raising fish hopefully it will even be less of an issue.
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Old 04-11-2007, 11:05 AM   #6
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That's why frags and aquacultured corals rock so much.
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Old 04-11-2007, 02:09 PM   #7
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I really doubt the 20 mph.....that's about as fast as the average person can sprint 100 yds! But they are quick (for starfish), venomous, and extremely destructive.

I think everyone should make an effort to buy aquacultured or maricultured corals, and also captive raised fish, fish that were sustainably caught, and also DO NOT buy fish (or corals) that have poor survival rates in captivity. If there is no demand for these species they will not be collected and will be left on the reef where they belong.

I think that other anthropogenic factors have more widespread impacts on reefs than collecting for the aquarium trade, but it is still significant. A couple of degree temp increase in the tropical ocean will dramatically change the status of many reefs as corals have a pretty tight temperature tolerance. Sedimentation and nutrient runoff are big problems especially in developing countries.
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Old 04-11-2007, 02:59 PM   #8
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is there any organization out there that help server and protect our natural reefs and oceans?

and i cant seem to just think that its just the reefs being affected. what about the fish and mammals also. like the whales and sharks. does the problem at hand affect them also?
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Old 04-11-2007, 03:57 PM   #9
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The collecting of marine fish , for the hobby, with the use of cyanide, has led to much destruction of the coral reefs. the cyanide kills the are of reef that it contacts. There is a group that has gone to the Philipines and taught fisherman alternative methods, to cyanide, which protects the reefs, and gives the fisherman a better price for his catch. It is in the interest of these fisherman to protect their livelihood. In the US, I believe live rock farming (by permit) has been the norm in Florida, if I remeber correctly. It is just one of many factors destroying the reefs.
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Old 04-11-2007, 04:14 PM   #10
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what is cyanide and how is it used?
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