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Old 09-25-2006, 10:57 PM   #11
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Not to dispute the theory of 3rd stage nitrification, but here is a theory for you guys to chew the fat about. The more LR you have and the larger the LR the more surface area there in lies providing more places for coralline allege to grow thus leading to more nitrate consumption ultimately leading to the perfect tank environment. If the bioload in the tank is that which would substantiate the total amount of chemical consumption there would be no need to perform PWC to take out bad water. Therefore in theory if the correct amount of LR with coraline alogia covering it versus bioload is achieved PWC can become a thing of the past.
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Old 10-01-2006, 12:08 PM   #12
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The more LR you have and the larger the LR the more surface area there in lies providing more places for coralline allege to grow thus leading to more nitrate consumption ultimately leading to the perfect tank environment.
I have found no evidence to suggest that coraline algae aids in NO3 reduction. However, there are certain types of macros that do aid in NO3 reduction via nutrient export. You are correct about the amount of surface area of the rock playing an important part in the overall health of a tank. More surface area= more beneficial bacteria.
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If the bioload in the tank is that which would substantiate the total amount of chemical consumption there would be no need to perform PWC to take out bad water. Therefore in theory if the correct amount of LR with coraline alogia covering it versus bioload is achieved PWC can become a thing of the past.
Not really. the correct amount of biological filtration vs. bioload is extremely important in keeping NO3 levels low. However, PWC bring more to the party then just NO3 reduction. They also serve to buffer Ph, maintain proper CA/ALK balance and replenish depleted trace elements in the water.
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Old 10-01-2006, 01:40 PM   #13
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So what you're saying is because I have alot of LR & LS in my tank along with corals,worms etc.Then my Nitrate level should be zero.

It's not by the way...It's 75mg/l
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Old 10-01-2006, 01:55 PM   #14
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Yes it should be 0 provided your not helping the nitrates cause. Feeding every other day and not overfeeding when you do, making sure that PWC and top off water is not high in nitrates, using a skimmer to remove DOC`s that turn into nitrates and doing PWC`s to remove excessive nitrients. By doing these simple things yes a skimmer and LR/LS will keep nitrates at 0.
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Old 10-01-2006, 01:59 PM   #15
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If your source water has excess nutrients, or your feeding is either imbalanced, or has questionable ingredients, these can be contributing to the nitrate problem.
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Old 10-01-2006, 02:17 PM   #16
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If your source water has excess nutrients, or your feeding is either imbalanced, or has questionable ingredients, these can be contributing to the nitrate problem.
Ditto, at one point I didn't know about soaking frozen home made fish food in RO/DI water to get the excess nutrients out and wondered why I why was having problems with algae breakouts. Started doing that and the algae started to die back after several water changes. Then the clean up crew was able to catch up and stay ahead of it.
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Old 10-01-2006, 04:36 PM   #17
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I haven't done any water changes at all.I have just been topping up the evaporated water.Adding Amquel+ to it.

I think I will have to start doing frequent water changes.This might sound stupid...But how is this done?Do I have to add anything to the tap water,do I have to leave it to stand for any length of time?

Also I only have one fish (hi fin goby) how often should I be feeding it & wot should I be feeding him?
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Old 10-01-2006, 05:35 PM   #18
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I think I will have to start doing frequent water changes.This might sound stupid...But how is this done?
It is easy. In a seperate container such as 5gal bucket or rubbermaid tub, add the water (RO/DI is prefered over tap) and the salt to the desired SG. Put in a powerhead, heater and airstone and let it age for 24-48hrs. the new water should be the same temp and Ph as the tank in order to reduce stress on the livestock.
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Also I only have one fish (hi fin goby) how often should I be feeding it & wot should I be feeding him?
Being your NO3 is at 75 it suggests either over-feeding or poor source water. One fish in the tank is not enought bioload to produce an NO3 readng of that high. Cut feedings back to very light, every other day. feeding a variety of food is important, as is using dietary suppliments such as vita chem, selcon or zoe.
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Old 10-01-2006, 05:39 PM   #19
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Thanks for your reply...

what is RO/DI water & SG
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Old 10-01-2006, 05:44 PM   #20
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RO/DI = reverse osmosis/deionized water. It is water that has been pushed through an RO/DI filter is about 99.99% pure. Tap water contains many heavy metals and chemicals and organics. RO/DI removes these. SG = specific gravity. It is a measure of "density" of the water and is related to salinity.
Here is a hint...move your cursor over the abbreviation and it will tell you what it means
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