Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater Reef Aquaria
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 11-09-2002, 02:24 AM   #1
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: OH USA
Posts: 33
Star-fish

I have a sand sifting star fish, and would really like to get another colorful star fish. The lfs has 2 little red stars, I have my eye on, but I need to know if they are reef safe. It is not a serpant or brittle body style. Just regular shape like the sand sifter. The are only about 2-3 inches acrossed, and red in color. Does anyone know what type it maybe and if they are reef safe and fairly hardy? I like the blue star but have read they are hard to keep. I really like the brittles to but have only ever seen green ones and been told the green ones aren't reef safe. Are there any brittle or serpants that are reef safe? Thanks for all replies!
__________________

__________________
brat213 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 09:24 AM   #2
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Lakewood, NJ
Posts: 111
Send a message via Yahoo to SleeplessLwd
I don't know about the Red Brittle Stars, but there is a brown or black brittle start that is reef safe.
Here's some information I found on Red Sea Stars:

Red Sea Star
(Formia milleporella)
Quick Stats
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-78°F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4
Temperament: Peaceful
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 5"
Reef Compatible: Yes
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Indonesia
Family: Ophidiasteridae



The Red Sea Star, or Red Starfish, of the genus Fromia may be various shades of red. It has multiple black pores (dots) on its surface. The tips of the arms are the same or a lighter color than the rest of the arm, differentiating it from Fromia indica.

It generally lives alone, but if the aquarium is large enough to support more than one, it will tolerate others of its own species. It requires a mature tank with algae and is generally fairly self-sufficient in the aquarium, finding enough micro-organisms and detritus to scavenge if live rock is present. It is diurnal. It is intolerant of copper-based medications and high levels of nitrate, and is very sensitive to changes in specific gravity, temperature, salinity and pH of the water, and oxygen levels. Avoid exposing a Red Sea Star to air or sudden salinity changes, as this is detrimental to its health, often resulting in bacterial infections and necrosis of an arm, or possible death.

The Red Sea Star is extremely difficult to breed in an aquarium, with no distinguishing characteristics to help differentiate it from its mate.

If there is insufficient algae growth in the aquarium, the diet should be supplemented with flaked foods, and small pieces of fish or mussel.

Approximate Purchase Size: 3/4" to 1-1/2"
__________________

__________________
SleeplessLwd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 10:30 AM   #3
AA Team Emeritus
 
reefrunner69's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Cedar Key, FL
Posts: 1,663
Without a pic it is very difficult,really impossible to id the star in question The bittle and serpant stars are reef safe with the exception of the green (emerald) brittle star (Ophiarachna incrassata).

picture from www.fishsupply.com
__________________
Kevin

Visit Nature Coast Photography
reefrunner69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 11:55 AM   #4
Alf
Aquarium Advice Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Venus Texas
Posts: 75
Thr Star you are discribing sound like the Red Fromia star. they are listed as reef safe. But they are very difficul to keep. Expert only or advanced reef keeper.
__________________
Robert

See My Tanks through the links below:Have you Joined your Local Marine Club?? For The Dallas Fort Worth area, sign up at DFWMAS
Alf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 12:03 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: OH USA
Posts: 33
Thank you both for your replies! So If I understand correctly, it sounds like the green britttles and choco. chips are the ones that aren't reef safe.
__________________
brat213 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 12:18 PM   #6
AA Team Emeritus
 
reefrunner69's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Cedar Key, FL
Posts: 1,663
Quote:
Originally Posted by brat213
So If I understand correctly, it sounds like the green britttles and choco. chips are the ones that aren't reef safe.
Most species of starfish, available in the aquarium trade, are not reef safe. There is an excellent article iabout starfish in the Nov, 2002 issue of AFM, if you can get a back issue.
__________________
Kevin

Visit Nature Coast Photography
reefrunner69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 12:30 PM   #7
Alf
Aquarium Advice Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Venus Texas
Posts: 75
Quote:
Most species of starfish, available in the aquarium trade, are not reef safe.
Ditto!!
__________________
Robert

See My Tanks through the links below:Have you Joined your Local Marine Club?? For The Dallas Fort Worth area, sign up at DFWMAS
Alf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 03:33 PM   #8
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: OH USA
Posts: 33
Hummm,, I guess I thought wrong! I love the blue stars but ruled them out because I heard they were really hard to keep (but I read in several post that many do have success). I'm after a good cleaner for my LR. My sand sifter, stay right on or under the sand, always! I was fascinated by the green brittle I saw at the store he moved so fast and kindda whip his legs around, but he was to big for my tank plus not reef safe. I like the serpent/brittle shape, but have never seen anything but green ones, so I've never considered getting 1. Which star fish are recommended, so I can keep my eyes open for a good one. I'm going to go surf again and see if I can find a good picture of what I think the red star is the lfs has, I know it is not shaped like a serpent it is not a linkia style either I don't believe, If I happen to find a picture I'll try to post it.
Thank you!
One more question,, I heard that emerald crabs are great for reef tanks and will eat bubble algea, then I've been told that they aren't reef safe.
Many of the online fish shops list them in their reef packages. So I need an experienced opinion if they are safe or not.
Thanks
__________________
brat213 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 03:46 PM   #9
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: OH USA
Posts: 33
This picture is the closest to looking like the star the lfs has but the stores is only about 2 inches. It is called a formia on this picture, I got from live aquaria. I've read that some crab will eat slow moving stars. Can this type star keep from being attacked by my hermits and anemones if it is healthy? And yet not eat my snails. I need one to clean the hard to reach spots in my live rock, thats why I liked the little thin arms of the serpents, figure they could get any wasted food from the small crevices. BUt I want to make an educated discission, or at least try to.
I'm definitely not a expert so what would be a good star for me, if this type is extremely hard to keep, I've heard the same about linkia's but the sellers say they are hardy, and claim them all to be reef safe except the choco. chip and green brittles. Discission, discission!
Thank so much to you all for help!
__________________
Love all pets! When You get them it means you take thier life in your hands,(Like a marriage,LOL- for better or worse) do your best to care for them and they will bring you years of joy! And are likely to give you less of a hard time than a human spouse!
brat213 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2002, 04:03 PM   #10
AA Team Emeritus
 
reefrunner69's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Cedar Key, FL
Posts: 1,663
For Starfish info and ID, check out these links...

http://www.fishindex.com/phpinfo//88/1-1

http://www.wetwebmedia.com/seastars.htm

http://www.aquarium.net/0797/0797_2.shtml

As far as crabs are concerned, imo, there is no such thing as a "reef safe" crab. All crabs are opportunistic omnivores, some may prefer algae, detritus, etc..., but if that source of food runs out they will eat something. Emerald crabs are noted for eating valonia species algae, as well as other algaes including coralline. It really is a personal decision as to whether to put "reef safe" crabs in ones tank, even with the info above, I do use some dwarf zebra hermits and a scarlet hermit crab as part of my clean up crew.
__________________

__________________
Kevin

Visit Nature Coast Photography
reefrunner69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
star

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
star fish blazeyreef Saltwater Reef Aquaria 5 10-23-2006 12:08 AM
How do you know if a star fish is dead? Civicman86 Saltwater & Reef - Sick Fish or Coral 3 08-31-2005 01:01 AM
star fish Mercury64 Saltwater Reef Aquaria 8 03-17-2005 12:35 AM
sick star fish? revolutionneo Saltwater & Reef - Sick Fish or Coral 1 05-21-2004 03:33 AM
star fish? jester Saltwater Reef Aquaria 1 04-26-2004 05:37 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.