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Old 02-06-2010, 10:08 AM   #111
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Originally Posted by Floyd R Turbo View Post

I like this picture, the puffer is all smiles for the recently added shell buffet!
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Old 02-06-2010, 11:04 AM   #112
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I don't think your CUC will eat your cyano or your hair algae...so one out of three isn't so bad....1. won't eat cyano, 2. won't eat hair algae 3. Puffer will eat all of your CUC! hahahaha lol
So are you telling me that ReefCleaners.org | Clean Up Crews and Macro Algae - Home is guilty of false advertising? Here's their descriptions:

Assorted hermits

This mix of assorted reef safe hermit crabs are good at removing hair algae, film algae, detritus and cyanobacteria from your tank. They will eat some thinner macros, and ulva, scroll algae, and Halymenia may be at risk. Thin legs will often eat caulerpa as well. While they will not eat your corals, they may attack snails for their shells, and this is something to be mindful of in your tank. You can reduce this risk by having plenty of empty shells for them to move into.

Dwarf Cerith

These smaller Cerith snails range in size from a half and inch to almost 1'', but are slender. These snails will consume diatoms, cyano, film algae, detritus, and hair algae in the substrate as well as on rocks and to some extent the glass in your aquarium. Because of their versatility and hardiness, they are our favorite species of cleaner. Because of their smaller size, they are able to clean the nooks and crannies in your live rock, where algae hides, and detritus pockets decay into available nutrients and clog pores. We consider these to be some of the most versatile snails we know of, and recommend them as the "staple" of your cleaning crew.

Nassarius Vibex

Excellent sand stirrer and scavenger. These snails will pop out of the sand when they smell food, or when you are feeding the fish. Contrary to popular belief these snails do NOT eat algae; they eat detritus and leftover fish food. They are still good in your tank though, because they will help maintain your nitrate levels, and clean some of the debris that is building up in your substrate.
These snails are almost a must for those of you with messy eaters, such as predatory fish and seahorses. They are also good to have around if your fish are well fed.
They grow to about a half of an inch tall, and 3/5 of an inch in length. A decent sized snail. Combining them with our Cerith and Dwarf Planaxis Snails is the best way to get your substrate clean.

Nerite snails

The popular Nerite snails is checkered with variable markings that make it an attractive addition to the reef tank. In addition to good looks, the Nerite Snail is a voracious consumer of detritus, algae and especially diatoms and cyanobacteria - including Lyngbya. These snails are excellent for cleaning the rocks and glass of your aquarium, and get along well with others.They will not consume display macro algae.

????????
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Old 02-07-2010, 01:18 AM   #113
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Numerous websites are out there selling snails that list them as eaters of cyano - but I've never witnessed it. Doesn't mean it can't happen though, I suppose.
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Old 02-07-2010, 03:57 PM   #114
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Wow, according to that, no one should have a problem with cyanobacteria, hair algae if they have enough of their snails. What a great idea. Sure makes keeping a SW tank easy to keep under control.
Just kidding...As Kurt says, never seen that happen....
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Old 02-07-2010, 04:46 PM   #115
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I've never seen anything eat cyano and Mexican Turbo snails are the only think that I have witnessed eating hair algae (ok maybe a sailfin blenny too).
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Old 02-07-2010, 04:52 PM   #116
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When I first set up my 29BC I had hair algae out the whazoo. I put in some mexican turbo snails and other snails and the algae was gone overnight. Not so with cyano!
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Old 02-08-2010, 01:39 AM   #117
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Agree... mexican turbos are definitely good for hair algae. And also finding any unsecured corals that may be in your tank.
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Old 02-08-2010, 01:55 AM   #118
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lol
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Old 02-08-2010, 09:29 AM   #119
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Thanks Kurt. I should have metiioned that the turbos are buldozers in both ways. They clear a path through the HA and bulldoze anything in their way including unattached or weakly attached corals.
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Old 02-08-2010, 07:32 PM   #120
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Well, time will tell I guess, the green hair algae is already coming back. I've got Brightwell Phosphat-R and ROWAphos in the sump, and Purigen, plus the skimmer now which I cleaned today and it was about 1/2" of almost black with a hint of green liquid, and the inner neck was coated with brown sludge already. On the reef tank I also maintain it takes weeks to form that sludge. I wanted to adjust the bubbles up, but decided that I better just leave it alone for at least another week and monkey with it then to make sure it's broken in fully. Saturday when I tested Phosphates they were about 1 or maybe 1.5, so they're staying where they are but maybe coming up slightly. This tank I think is loaded with them, whenever I did a PWC in the past, the phosphates were down immediately after, but the next day shot right up again. On the ROWAphos instructions, it says that phosphates will get leeched out of the substrate, etc, so I'm guessing that there is some kind of equilibrium point, and if I removed the phosphates out of the water, whatever is in the substrate gets leeched back into the water until a new equilibrium point is reached. If this is the case, I might as well put the rest of the ROWAphos in that tank and just let it run it's course. Heck, it might be worth investing in a phosphate reactor, or just making one DIY. Can't be that hard.
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