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Old 07-23-2013, 09:31 PM   #1
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Thinking if going salt

Hey guys

So at the start of the school year (end of summer) my parents are going to let me get a new tank either a 55 or a 75

I originally had my eye on a knife fish but I recently discovered the dwarf species of lionfish that can fit in a tank that size

I currently have several freshwater tanks and I've been keeping fish for about 5-6 years

When j proposed the lionfish idea to my parents several issues arouse (I'm sure you can guess one of them lol)

1. My mom is no stranger to aquatic fish so she obviously started worrying about he idea of me getting stung by one One of the spines

2. She worries that a saltwater tank will be too difficult for me to maintain

Is she right?
Is saltwater that difficult? Is the water chemistry that hard to maintain? And aren't lions pretty hardy fish? What specialized equipment is required to transition to saltwater? Lights,test kits, medication ect.
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Old 07-23-2013, 11:07 PM   #2
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I would say not necessarily more difficult, just a whole different set of rules than freshwater. There is a lot to learn and patience is the key. 55 or 75 is a good size tank to start with because the more water volume the more room for error. I can tell you that the startup cost is going to be quite high so be prepared for that! I assume with a lion fish it will be fish only? Not reef? That saves you a load because you won't need fancy lighting. You will need to test regularly and weekly water changes. Check out the start up articles on here for some good reference material...
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Old 07-24-2013, 04:19 AM   #3
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I would say not necessarily more difficult, just a whole different set of rules than freshwater. There is a lot to learn and patience is the key. 55 or 75 is a good size tank to start with because the more water volume the more room for error. I can tell you that the startup cost is going to be quite high so be prepared for that! I assume with a lion fish it will be fish only? Not reef? That saves you a load because you won't need fancy lighting. You will need to test regularly and weekly water changes. Check out the start up articles on here for some good reference material...
I agree, in fact lionfish don't like bright reef lighting. I say of the two get a 75, more water volume means less fluctuation, ie evaporation will affect the salinity less.
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Old 07-24-2013, 11:45 AM   #4
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You could do a beautiful 75g with a marine betta, dwarf lionfish, and a snowflake eel

But they are right, the startup costs will be quite a bit higher than a fresh tank. For one, you will need a skimmer (people will argue this but lionfish are big waste producers) and an RO/DI unit. You can get away with buying dry rock and cycing it yourself to save some money. I prefer the look of 1lb / gallon.

As for getting stung by the spines, as long as you aren't trying to punch the fish or chase it around with your hand, it shouldn't sting you.

It can be tough to keep water quality under control but not too difficult, especially if you already have experience with keeping fish. Plus, you always have access to us when you have issues
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Old 07-25-2013, 05:30 PM   #5
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Would a tuxedo urchin be compatible with this setup?

And just out of curiosity, could I keep any kind of sea slug/cucumber in the tank?
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Old 07-25-2013, 05:55 PM   #6
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I don't know about sea slugs but all of those species tend to eat a lot of inverts
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Old 07-25-2013, 06:40 PM   #7
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I don't know about sea slugs but all of those species tend to eat a lot of inverts
Don't know where you got that from they are all reef safe?!?!?
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Old 07-25-2013, 06:42 PM   #8
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I don't know about sea slugs but all of those species tend to eat a lot of inverts
If you meant the Lion fish? They aren't reef safe but they won't eat a toxic slug or a spiny urchin
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Old 07-25-2013, 07:02 PM   #9
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Kept lions for years. Good fish to keep as they are a huge pest in the Caribbean.

Lions are Not reef safe as they will eat anything they can get in their huge mouths. Urchins, snails and stars should be okay.

Snowflakes are in the same category.

Both are big eaters and produce lots of poop, so a skimmer is a good idea.

You will live thru a sting from the lion, but it will hurt really badly. You need to be cautious but if you use your head it will all be fine.
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Old 07-25-2013, 07:02 PM   #10
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Lion fish wouldn't eat sessile invertebrates like sea slugs but they would eat shrimp, crabs and smaller fish.
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