Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater Reef Aquaria
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 11-26-2005, 06:29 PM   #11
SW REEF 18+ YEARS
Community Admin
 
melosu58's Avatar



Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 38,242
That`s actually a very good question. Like the prior person said you could add more live rock where your good bacteria would be at to reduce ammonia and Nitrates and A refugium with calerpa to reduce the nitrates. Water changes also reduce nitrates. And yes skimmers will remove DOC that contribute to nitrates.
__________________

__________________

SITE ADMINISTRATOR

You can view many of my fish and corals in my photo albums in my profile.

View my tank


AA Community Rules|AA TOS

Forums 101 - posting, accounts, basics
melosu58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2005, 06:47 PM   #12
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Montgomery County MD
Posts: 288
No to Biowheel
__________________

__________________
We live and we learn
AMANIQU77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2005, 08:15 PM   #13
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 176
You guys are always so quick to jump on the bio wheel. Melo is totally correct, The ammonia is way worse than the nitrate. I ran 2 penguin 330's in my 75 gal tank for over a year and never had a reading for nitrate.

When a tank is new and just getting settled, the benefits of a bio-wheel far outway the drawbacks specially in the absence of corals! It caries the bacteria that you want so you don't get an ammonia spike and does it in a wet/dry environment. You can add new livestock and worry less and until the detrius builds up in the bio-wheel, it is not going to create more nitrate.
__________________
phishead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2005, 12:55 AM   #14
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Montgomery County MD
Posts: 288
Hmm, I thought wet/dry filters or wet/dry environments aren't necessarily efficient as well when it comes to marine tanks? I may be wrong.
__________________
We live and we learn
AMANIQU77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2005, 08:44 AM   #15
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: illinois
Posts: 291
Well i'll jump in here I go along with "Phishead" I run 3 penguins on my tank with some soft corals, fish, inverts. Going on a year and half now and still no problems with any reading. By the way three zero's across the broad

Side note i got over a hunderd pounds of lr with it covered in all types of alage and after reseting the tank back up with ro/di water compared to tap, i still have die off off two months later.

If you have some safe rock that is completely clean just throw it in and the other rock will sead it in time. MUCH CHEAPER than buying live rock.

For instantce i bought a few pounds every now and then to add to the tank with the bio wheels. Also when i started with the tank i used dead coral skeletons for decorations. Know they are coverd in coraling and all kinds of stuff so with a poress as the skeleton is i would consider them know live and also helping my bio load.

So a over a year out the bio wheels work for me and i have heard that eventually they will so called "gunk up " and if your worried about this i would just buy and extra bio wheel and start it in the tank and try and slowly switch out old vs new. I dont remember the stats but i think after a weeks the quote the weel as full of bacteria?

GOOD LUCK!
__________________
flame82 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2005, 09:00 AM   #16
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Panama City Beach, FL
Posts: 547
I have had my bioballs for over two years. I am very happy with them. Many people have suggested switching to lr rubble instead. I have not taken their suggestions after long consideration.

I clean the bioballs regularly and I feel that they are more a benefit to my tank and a hindrance. It is a preference call; some will tell you no bioballs, others will tell you that they are fine. As long as you have proper filtration and user ro/di water for changes, you will be fine with bioballs.
__________________
JPloman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2005, 12:57 PM   #17
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
boardsurfer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 823
Just a precaution, if you have the penguin dual bio-wheel and you want to take the biowheels out- I'd take out one at a time (especially if you have little LR). For example, take one out- wait a week or two and then take out the other. I really doubt it matters too much, but it's just a precaution.

I took the bio-wheels out after the first year of tank running (after I got 1.5 lbs of LR per gallon.) and my nitrates decreased a bit. Zero readings across the board for ammonia, trates, and trites. I agree with one of the above posts...the bio-wheels help if little LR present, but take them out if you have 1lb or more LR per gallon.
__________________
- Mike
125 gal. reef w sump/refugium & 8-bulb 640w T5's
45 gal fresh w/plants + CPF lighting
boardsurfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2005, 03:09 PM   #18
Aquarium Advice Regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 96
i have an emperor powerfilter with bio-wheel running on my 15 gallon nano. i have four decent sized fish in there....0 nitrates. people call them nitrate factories...that's kinda the point. you get the nitrate from converting ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate.
__________________
15 gallon nano-reef (4 months old)
-pair of false percula clowns
-royal gramma
-convict blenny
-bubble coral
-clove polyps
-green hairy mushroom
-cleaner shrimp

pics
Genix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2005, 08:38 PM   #19
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 176
Quote:
I have had my bioballs for over two years. I am very happy with them. Many people have suggested switching to lr rubble instead. I have not taken their suggestions after long consideration.
Yeah, plus bio balls are cheaper, and live rock rubble is going to fill with the same detrius that is collecting in the balls. You just cant clean it out. Put the rock in the tank where it works well.

Quote:
took the bio-wheels out after the first year of tank running (after I got 1.5 lbs of LR per gallon.) and my nitrates decreased a bit. Zero readings across the board for ammonia, trates, and trites. I agree with one of the above posts...the bio-wheels help if little LR present, but take them out if you have 1lb or more LR per gallon.
Good point. Plus if you have this much cured rock you would not need the bio-wheel anyway.

Quote:
people call them nitrate factories...that's kinda the point. you get the nitrate from converting ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate.
Yes, the problem is when they do get full of yuckies, then they will create more nitrate than without!

I removed the penguins slowly about three months apart. THe water quality went down until I figured out how to filter the water well. Now I run just a sump with a filter bag on the inlet. I rinse it weekly, and the water stays much cleaner. The standard filter cartridge in the HOB does provide some quality mechanical filtration that is obviously needed, I do not believe in running straight Berlin method, because when I did, the water was really bad. THat could be because I do not have a very good skimmer though.
__________________
phishead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2005, 08:59 PM   #20
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
lando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Savage, MN
Posts: 7,889
I used an Emperor 400 with biowheels on my first reef tank. I always have NO3 readings of 0-2.5. I also had over 2lbs/gal of LR to help reduce the NO3. Biowheels and all wet/drys do a wonderful job of keep NH3 and NO2 at zero. They create a great aerobic enviornment for benefical bacteria to thrive (which help in the consumption of NH3 and NO2). NO3 consuming bacteria do better in an anaerobic environment, ie...submerged LR. While things like converting bioballs to LR rubble and removing biowheels MAY help decrease NO3, it is still good old fashion changes, appropriate stocking, light feedings and plenty of LR that will have the biggest effect. Do an experiment...remove the biowheels for a couple months and do everything else exactly as you are now. Test NO3 along the way and see if it changes. Let me know...I an curious myself
__________________

__________________
Some people are like slinkies...they serve no real purpose yet can still bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs!:p
Have a great day! Brian
lando is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bio, bio-wheel, eel

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bio wheel or bio filter crusch Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 1 08-01-2009 03:31 AM
Bio Wheel or No Bio Wheel - How is my filtration? mnestroy Saltwater Fish Only & FOWLR 24 05-27-2006 12:18 PM
Bio-Falls vs. Bio-Wheel kane2004 General Hardware/Equipment Discussion 1 01-08-2005 11:48 PM
What's Better? Bio Wheel or Trickle Filter with Bio-Balls? Chiselchst General Hardware/Equipment Discussion 8 04-27-2004 01:05 AM
What's Better, a Bio-Wheel or Trickle Filter with Bio Balls? Chiselchst Saltwater Reef Aquaria 1 04-23-2004 05:51 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.