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Old 03-14-2013, 10:46 PM   #11
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I'm really not sure how low your lights go. a night time is definitely important to fish and coral health.
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Old 03-14-2013, 10:52 PM   #12
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I'm using a maxspect razor 27" 1600k . The 1% blue is really low but I can still see if the room is dark. Maybe I'll setup a new profile with everything off for several hours and see if anything changes.
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Old 03-15-2013, 12:17 AM   #13
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Last night I had the moonlights on (they have been consistently on for 2 weeks)
Last night he did not close up the whole night and did not close the whole day (today) either. he has decided to move onto the glass about 4 inches away from his usual spot (his usual spot for past 2 months has been on a rock - only moved 2-3 cm a few times - so this is odd.

Tonight after the regular light cycle was over, I turned the moonlights off and he closed up within 5 min (still on the glass though) Currently completely closed up except for 2 puffed up tentacles coming out.


Observations so far: he opens up when actinic go on, then he is fully puffed up during the white lights. Then when white lights go off (actinic on), he remains fully open, and he then remains open while moonlights are on, and usually closes up around 10 am.
However if in complete darkness he closes up completely. So I will say that he definitely perceives light and darkness.
I will see how he behaves through the next few nights in complete darkness.
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Old 03-15-2013, 12:30 AM   #14
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According to Mr. Oliver Crimmen, Fish Curator, Department of Zoology of The Natural History Museum
Fish do in fact need sleep - although they do not exhibit the same REM brain patterns, their sleep has restorative properties. Parrot fish secrete a mucus to protect themselves while they sleep.
Their sleep is characterized by reduced activity and thus conservation of energy - however they are still able to react to danger - just takes a slower response rate at first
Unihemispheric sleep refers to sleeping with only a single cerebral hemisphere - exhibited in birds and fish.
As for corals - anything that has zooxanthellae needs a period of darkness for the respiration part of the photosynthesis cycle to take place.

(Which is if a plant is kept in light 24-7 eventually dies - duh I should have known that)

So this brings up the next question: Does coral perceive your moonlights? Does it eventually close up and go into a rest-mode?
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:10 AM   #15
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So this brings up the next question: Does coral perceive your moonlights? Does it eventually close up and go into a rest-mode?
+1 i just had a switch on my moonlights tonight i have them set to turn off at 6 30 am. To give them total darkness for a few hours, then natural light slowly creeps in and dampens my room with very soft light, then my actinics will go on at 930 am off at 10 pm
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Old 03-16-2013, 01:49 AM   #16
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There are aquarists who enjoy looking at their tank with all the flavors that simulates a natural habitat of both fish and corals in the reef . While there are some who just prefer corals and make them healthy and bloom for the sake of the challenge it entails. I am one of the former.
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Old 03-16-2013, 10:47 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ella_e View Post
According to Mr. Oliver Crimmen, Fish Curator, Department of Zoology of The Natural History Museum
Fish do in fact need sleep - although they do not exhibit the same REM brain patterns, their sleep has restorative properties. Parrot fish secrete a mucus to protect themselves while they sleep.
Their sleep is characterized by reduced activity and thus conservation of energy - however they are still able to react to danger - just takes a slower response rate at first
Unihemispheric sleep refers to sleeping with only a single cerebral hemisphere - exhibited in birds and fish.
As for corals - anything that has zooxanthellae needs a period of darkness for the respiration part of the photosynthesis cycle to take place.

(Which is if a plant is kept in light 24-7 eventually dies - duh I should have known that)

So this brings up the next question: Does coral perceive your moonlights? Does it eventually close up and go into a rest-mode?
A coral will eventually die just like a plant if it has no night time.
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Old 03-16-2013, 03:56 PM   #18
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So this brings up the next question: Does coral perceive your moonlights? Does it eventually close up and go into a rest-mode?
I would say it depends on how bright your moonlight is. Human eyes can not measure the intensity of light when it comes to the lower and higher frequency of the light spectrum. In fact infrared and ultraviolet are invisible. The color blue may seem dark to us but its intensity is deceiving. Also, In the real world the moon has a cycle which means half of the month there is total darkness.
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Old 03-27-2013, 03:30 PM   #19
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So its been 12 days. I did 4 nights with moonlights, 4 nights without moonlights, and 4 days of white light only.
Without moonlights the anemone (test subject) would generally close up for the night within the first hour of the lights being shut off.
With moonlights on the anemone would stay open for several hours thereafter and generally would closeup a couple of hours before natural daylight hit the room. With the moonlights on and natural sunlights, the anemone would open but would not fully extend.
So I decided to see how the anemone reacts to a very bright white light in a separate tank. If the light is shined upon the anemone (which was attached to a rock - so the nem was 4 inches from the surface) after a Completely dark night, the anemone would detach and try find a slightly darker spot that still receives a lot of light. The light was then put to the side of the aquarium and the anemone found a spot on the bottom of the tank, but still in the direct path of the light.
My final conclusion? I will probably keep the moonlights on for 2 weeks of the month, and 2 weeks off. In the regular tank, the nem was attached to a rock about 8 inches from the surface - so it likes the amount of light that it receives from that area.
When I first received the Condy anemone it was a very pale white with pink tips. Now the anemone ~2 months later is a tan color with pink tips - and it looks a lot more puffed up and bigger. Throughout the 2 months, the anemone always had the moonlights on ad was fed 1-2 times a week. So I will do the 2 weeks on/off and see how that goes.
Haha I should propose this as research at my university! They were already researching how higher CO2 affects inverts, why not this!
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