Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Freshwater > Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 08-13-2012, 01:42 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Jacobsal91's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Northeastern usa
Posts: 753
Advice on goldfish?

Sorry if this is the inorrect forum but ive had cichlids my whole life and im looking for change. I have a new found love for goldfish im not sure why i find them adorable.. I really like orandas, and ranchus are my favorite. What exactly would i need to keep this big
Guys?
__________________

__________________
Jacobsal91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 01:55 PM   #2
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
tamtam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: new brunswick
Posts: 1,441
Send a message via MSN to tamtam
I like goldies too but can't get passed the space they need. lol.

For those types of goldies I'd say you want to start with a 30 gallon for 1, for each additional goldy you plan to keep you'll need an extra 10 gallons. So for 3 you would need a 50 gallon. These types grow to be about 8 inches I believe. I also remember reading that they do most of their growing in the first 2-3 years so it's best to just hop into a proper sized tank and not risk stunting their growth.

You need to have it heavily filtered. I think it's recommended that you use double the filtration on your tank because they are such huge waste producers.

They can also be diggers so keep this in mind if you wanted to try plants, they may not survive. Generally I think people like to leave the tank mostly open, some rocks/decor is great but being big fish they also like their space to swim and seem to really use it.

Diet is pretty similar to most omnivores. You have a huge variety you can offer them.

I think that's really the basics. lol. hope this helps
__________________

__________________
1 fish, 2 fish, red fish, blue fish
tamtam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 02:04 PM   #3
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
bud29's Avatar

POTM Champion
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: In a van, down by the river
Posts: 3,673
Send a message via Yahoo to bud29
Yes. They need lots of space and filtration. Also, they are coldwater fish so an ideal temp. for them would be 68-72 degrees F. So you either need to keep your house cool or buy a cooling device for your tank which can be very expensive.
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
bud29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 02:18 PM   #4
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Jacobsal91's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Northeastern usa
Posts: 753
Very informative, thanks. I have a 36 bow front but was thinking of getting s 33 long, same length as a 55 but not as high. What do you think? I only really want 3 and and then i have one small comet that ive had for 3 years. Want to see him grow up a bit too.. Eventually im building a pond that i can put them all in if they get too big. And i really dont want to buy a chiller but at my job we sell these fans for aquariums they blow air on the service. I think 2 or 3 of those will work just as well as a chiller for a fraction of the price.. But anyway, What do you think of a 4ft 33 gallon for a start?
__________________
Jacobsal91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 03:08 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
bud29's Avatar

POTM Champion
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: In a van, down by the river
Posts: 3,673
Send a message via Yahoo to bud29
Well, it is recommended to keep single tail goldfish like commons and comets with only single tail goldfish, and fancy goldfish such as fantail goldfish and orandas just with fancies. This is because the single tailed goldfish are faster than the fancy goldfish and will out-compete the fancies for food.
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
bud29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 04:40 PM   #6
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Rivercats's Avatar



POTM Champion
Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Missouri
Posts: 13,146
We have some 6 inch plus orando's. They are my granddaughters and trust me they didn't start out 6 inches. Have them in a planted tank but the one piece of driftwood is thin and pushed against the back wall with Java ferns and anubias. A few Cryptocoryne ciliata which are really thick leaved, almost rubbery feeling, Green Temple Narrow leaf and ambula for grazing on and to help mop excess nutrients, BUT all plants have a rubbery plant anchor to help keep the monsters from being able to pull the plants up. Orando's are slow and can be very dangerous to themselves if you put anything (rocks, ornaments) that they can run into, get stuck behind, or generally do any type of body damage on. They need to be fed peas, shelled at least once a week so they don't get constipated, which happens in the heavy bodied fancy varieties. BUT other than all that they are adorably cute. As their head growth grows larger and heavier it gives their face a cherb look. Oh, water changes.... big and often. Even with that since they have grown so large their waste factor just overwhelms the filters and plants so we finally invested in a nitrate filter. Shameful but true. Still have to do the water changes but that is the only way to keep nitrates low. And you can't put orando's outside, well in the summer if you watch to be sure they are actually getting food (not the most graceful eaters either), but due to thier body structure they don't do the temp assimilation between summer and winter. I need a 2nd 220 gallon tank for them too but don't have the room right now. Just think it through before getting into them. Also, they are cool water fish but unless your house is mega hot they can just be kept in an unheated tank. We have a 2000+ koi pond and this summer with heat over 100 for weeks even the pond water was warm, only cool in the 3" deep water. They don't like the heat but can tolerate it as long as there is extra aretaion. I know this was kind of long but hope it gives you an idea of what it's like having them. Oh, a regular comet would not only swim circles around them but get most of the food.
__________________
Rivercats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 05:11 PM   #7
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Jacobsal91's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Northeastern usa
Posts: 753
Also very informative! Sounds fairly easy as long as i keep up woth water changes.. And i will keep in mind out doors isnt a good idea. And my little comet its pretty tiny i would like to try to keep him with the ranchu/orandas and if i see the comet taking all the food i can move him no problem but ill give it a trial. But back to tank size, Could a 4ft 33 gallon be a good start? Would their growth still be stunted?
__________________
Jacobsal91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 05:28 PM   #8
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Rivercats's Avatar



POTM Champion
Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Missouri
Posts: 13,146
They are going to have to be very little and figure you will eventually need to upgrade at least to a 55 gallon. Just to give you a growth idea, our orando's grew 3 to 4 inches in alittle less than a year, one feeding a day. Also watch your PH and KH. Goldfish tend to make thier water very acidic. Frequent water changes usually keep that at bay, but if you slack up the water ph will drop which can cause problems. I keep Seachem Alkaline buffer on hand just in case. It's just something you need to be aware of so you can watch it. Also, clean their filter often, a canister is the only way to go for goldfish. HOB filters just don't have enough filtration capibilities.
__________________
Rivercats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 06:00 PM   #9
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
RussellC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 311
+1 on just about everything that's been written so far. Just a couple of points:

When it comes to tank size, bigger is better. While this is true for the fish, it's also true for the fishkeeper. Bigger tanks have more stable water chemistry and are easier to maintain, something that might be especially true for fish that produce a fair amount of waste, like goldfish.

When it comes to mixing single and split-tail varieties, it perhaps isn't the ideal, but it can be done successfully. While I wouldn't start out the same way again, through a set of circumstances, my goldfish tank contains such a mix and with a little watchfulness around feeding time, nobody has a problem getting enough to eat.

Finally, when it comes to temperatures, it's true that goldies are coldwater fish, but they are very tolerant of a wide range of temperatures so long as the temperature change is relatively gradual. In my opinion, an air-conditioned house and/or a chiller isn't necessary for goldfish. We're in the middle of a heatwave where I live and our house isn't air conditioned. As a result, my tank temp's been in the upper 70's to mid 80's for a couple of weeks now and my fish are doing just fine.

Good luck with the goldies, I happen to love them too.
__________________
"I wish, I wish, I wish I were a fish" --Henry Limpet
RussellC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 06:19 PM   #10
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Jacobsal91's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Northeastern usa
Posts: 753
Quote:
Originally Posted by RussellC
+1 on just about everything that's been written so far. Just a couple of points:

When it comes to tank size, bigger is better. While this is true for the fish, it's also true for the fishkeeper. Bigger tanks have more stable water chemistry and are easier to maintain, something that might be especially true for fish that produce a fair amount of waste, like goldfish.

When it comes to mixing single and split-tail varieties, it perhaps isn't the ideal, but it can be done successfully. While I wouldn't start out the same way again, through a set of circumstances, my goldfish tank contains such a mix and with a little watchfulness around feeding time, nobody has a problem getting enough to eat.

Finally, when it comes to temperatures, it's true that goldies are coldwater fish, but they are very tolerant of a wide range of temperatures so long as the temperature change is relatively gradual. In my opinion, an air-conditioned house and/or a chiller isn't necessary for goldfish. We're in the middle of a heatwave where I live and our house isn't air conditioned. As a result, my tank temp's been in the upper 70's to mid 80's for a couple of weeks now and my fish are doing just fine.

Good luck with the goldies, I happen to love them too.
Ok, so let me just give u an idea on what im planning. I have a 36 bow front tank that im considering changing to a 33 long for extra swin space for a start.. Maybe have the 33 long for a while with 2 ranchu goldies in it, When they seem to be getting a bit big for that tank ill upgrade to at least a 55.. Buying these tanks is something ive been planning to do for a while so this is gunna be awesome. As for water parameters, 7.5 ph lightly salted with FW salt? Zero ammonia and all that right? Probably will do a sand subtrate to avoid choking.
__________________

__________________
Jacobsal91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
goldfish

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off








» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.