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Old 03-12-2005, 10:18 AM   #11
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I agree - a 10 lb. cylinder is the way to go. I made the mistake of only getting a 5 lb. cylinder and I have to refill the thing about every three months because it takes quite a bit of CO2 for a 125G. I'm also using it to run a 30G so I shouldn't really be complaining

And CO2 is perfectly safe as long as you're not throwing the bottle around the house
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Old 03-12-2005, 11:40 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaaikop
And again, noboby seems to want to answer that one: is this dangerous? 8O
has there ever been explosions? 8O I know it might sound silly, I do have
at home several fire extinguishers, and they don't explode by themselves!
There are far far greater dangers lurking in your home. In your garage you park a 1-2 ton hunk of steel filled with 20 gallons of combustible and extremely flammable liquid that has a very low flash point. In many homes you have gas water heaters that kill people yearly if not properly maintained. Just the gas lines are fairly dangerous. Bottom line is that CO2 tanks are in every restaurant and bar in America and you never hear of exploding tanks or asphyxiation associated with their use despite the high volume. Simple common sense in handling the tanks and securing them all but eliminates the potential for a large release of CO2. The tank won't explode.

CO2 dissipates very rapidly in air and unless you were in a small well sealed room (or car with the windows up and the A/C or heat on) the levels could never rise to dangerous levels with only 5-10 lbs of liquid CO2 available. Which brings the other issue up. The only way a small CO2 tank is going to effect the CO2 levels in a room dramatically is if the tank were to dump it's contents within a few minutes. That can only happen under two scenarios.

1) The safety valve blew. The safety valve is there to prevent a tank from exploding. The valve is designed to blow and release the pressure in a rapid yet controlled manner before the steel or aluminum tank fails. When the valve blows the noise from the release and subsequent hiss from the rapidly escaping gas would wake everyone in the house and alert them to open windows and doors. However, in order to blow a safety valve the tank would have to have been exposed to heat or overfilled to create the excessive pressure...it is almost a non-issue. The greatest danger of blowing a safety valve is in the ride home from having it filled. Another reason why tank exchanges are much better than refills.

2) If you don't store and support the tank properly and it falls over breaking off the regulator. This, in my opinion, is the biggest potential for a problem with a CO2 tank, but yet so easy to make perfectly safe. Knocking the regulator will cause a faster rate of release than the safety valve blowing and the tank itself would be propelled around the room. Secure the tank upright and this can never happen.

The main point is CO2 is totally safe if common safety is observed. Taking a bath can be more hazardous.
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Old 03-12-2005, 03:13 PM   #13
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Thanks guys for the explanations!

At least the scare part is taken care of. that makes a lot of sense...
Now for the $ 400.00.... I thought I could get a "complete" kit for about
200-250$. I guess the cylinders are extra... how much should I expect to
pay for a 10 lbs. cylinder, and for the "refill or exchange" cost, and also, just
to make sure it would fit inside my cabinet, what is the approx. size of a 10 lbs.?

Man, I'm gonna need to get a mortgage here!
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Old 03-12-2005, 10:45 PM   #14
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A 10 lb. CO2 tank should fit into your cabinet without a problem. The tank itself can cost anywhere from $40-$100 depending on prices in your area and whether you go with the cheaper steel tank or the more expensive (but lighter) aluminum tank. There's really no difference between the two except for weight and price.
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Old 03-13-2005, 02:26 PM   #15
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Thanks to all for taking the time to "educate" me on this rather "obcure"
piece of equipment... After reading a lot on here, I now understand how this
works and what is the purpose of each component of a pressurized system.
The solenoid and pH meter makes a lot of sense, it makes it basically trouble-free!

The only part that I still don't understand is the last stage, how the CO2 is
delivered to the tank. I have seen setups with water pumps, but I somehow was
under the impression that you could connect the CO2 to your Can. filter outlet?
That seems to me like a good idea, no? (although I have not seem anywhere how
it is connected). IMHO, any ugly piece of equipement that can be avoided from
being visible in the tank is the best...
I will try to find more info. before I make a move.
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Old 03-13-2005, 02:35 PM   #16
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Yes you can 'inject' the CO2 directly into the outflow of your canister filter using a piece of equipment called a reactor. You can buy one (I use the AB AquaMedic Reactor 1000 - outlined in pic below) or build your own. And like you said, it's nice not having another ugly piece of equipment sitting in your tank.

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Old 03-13-2005, 02:47 PM   #17
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Excuse my ignorance, but the "reactor" as shown on your picture is connected
"in-line" with your filter outlet (i.e. it has an inlet and outlet)? I just did not know
that... and that other cylindrical piece just before the reactor, is a inline heater, right? that too, I intend to install.

Duh! I think I finally get it! :P Thanks for taking the time with the picture!
that is VERY helpful (I am the "visual" type...)
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Old 03-13-2005, 04:59 PM   #18
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You got it
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Old 03-17-2005, 05:27 PM   #19
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Almost ready to order my CO2 system, but still a little confused...
I am looking at a "complete" system from www.aquatic-store.com
It is listed under "CO2 COMBO setups" there are some from Milwaukee
and from JBJ... It looks to me like most of these sets are complete, and
does include the pH meter, but some has "2-stage diffusor",
"4-stage diffusor" and "type 1000 reactor".

I think my best bet is the JBJ combo 4 with the 1000 reactor... What do
you think? It does include the pH meter right? so all I would need to get
locally is a filled CO2 cylinder.
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Old 03-17-2005, 06:05 PM   #20
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That's the exact same system I got from them and have had zero problems with it. I can recommend it.
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