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Old 08-14-2005, 06:25 PM   #1
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will a floor hold a 110 gallon on 2nd floor?

I'm planning on a 110 gallon tank with rockwork on the 2nd floor of my house. Does this pose a problem? Should I be worried?
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Old 08-14-2005, 06:26 PM   #2
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Your looking at 1100 plus pounds I would want to be sure the floor could hold it.
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Old 08-14-2005, 07:17 PM   #3
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That is what I'm worried about. Anyone with experience with larger upstairs tanks chime in.
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Old 08-14-2005, 10:25 PM   #4
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Well, my father has a 125 tank that is technically on a 2nd floor above a garage , it's a townhouse I guess. And it's pretty old so that should help. i guess it shouldn't really be a problem since most new houses are built very well, if you aren't sure, try asking a hiome builder or something like that. I bet someone in here is a construction worker.
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Old 08-14-2005, 10:26 PM   #5
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Well, I don't have a tank on my 2nd floor, but I have a pool table in the 3rd floor of my townhouse, and I've had no issues.... So, I'd say the tank should be just fine
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Old 08-14-2005, 10:27 PM   #6
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The tank must be situated against a load-bearing wall and perpendicular to floor joists. Consider how much a bathtub weighs, full of water, with a full-grown man in it, and you can see that it is possible to have a heavy tank on upper stories, as long as they are positioned correctly.
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Old 08-14-2005, 10:52 PM   #7
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Wooden bearers, i'd be hesitant.
Concrete 2nd floor, I wouldn't think twice.
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Old 08-15-2005, 01:43 AM   #8
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Personally, I would consult a structural engineer for any tank OVER 75 gal placed on anything other than a concrete slab.

The potential problem you face really is not collapse (unless your home was built by a bunch of muppets) - it's deflection, the slight flexing, or 'give' seen in structures placed under a heavy load. Floor deflection might cause your tank to become unlevel when completely filled. This could place stress on a seam and cause a leak.

My brother has a wine cellar in his dining room that weighs 1500 pounds when completely full. He had a structural engineer look at the underlying joists in the basement. It was determined that additional joist bridges and a lolly column were required to prevent the floor from deflecting.

Here is a useful link that I usually post in threads like this one.
http://www.cichlid-forum.com/article...ium_weight.php
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Old 08-15-2005, 09:03 AM   #9
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Well, I read the article on cichlid forum referred by QTOFFER. I'm somewhat concerned, but at the end of it all the author said that anything over 125 gallons should be looked into. My tank will be 110 gallons. Now, I still plan on getting some advice from a builder, and the guy that built the house originally is just around the block, so I can get some input from him too. I do plan on putting the tank against a wall. This wall does not seperate any rooms and is the same wall that goes down through my kitchen, so it may be a load bearing wall. I'm also gonna position close to a corner too so that may help. The fact that a pool table was in the room doesn't help me much b/c I checked some sites and I can't find one over 500 lbs. My tank will probably weigh about 1,230 to 1,250 lbs with the rock, oak stand and all. I used the same 125 gallon figures as the person did in the link and applied them to a 110 gallon. So I feel a little better about all of this and I appreciate all the input. I'll need more when/if I actually get the tank so keep it coming!
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Old 08-15-2005, 09:17 PM   #10
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a 9' table with 1" slate and full wood work weighs in excess of 1200lbs, depending on the manufacture. If the wall runs down thru your kitchen it is a loadbearing wall that also holds your exhaust pipes for the stove and most of your plumbing as well. Should be fine. When in doubt go with the exterior wall position. If it makes you feel better though, I have a california king waterbed that i know holds way more than 125 gallons of water. it sits in the middle of the room and even with "activity" it doesnt make the house "creek". Ask your builder and make sure your home-owner insurance covers it. I had to add waterbed/aquarium to my policy.
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