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Old 10-05-2011, 12:36 PM   #1
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1.025 vs 1.0264 Which Is Which?

Why is there so much confusion and conflicting advice over the recommended specific gravity of the saltwater for keeping reef?

My LFS says go with 1.025. Lots of reputable sources on the web say go with 1.026 (1.264 or 35 PPT to be exact).

Many users here target 1.025.

And Reef Crystals' salt instrucrions recommend a range of 1.020 to 1.023 at 75 degrees. Well, that's great but if you're using a refractometer that auto temp adjusts, then what? Not to mention their target not in the range of 1.025 or 1.026.

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Old 10-05-2011, 02:02 PM   #2
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1.025 and 1.026 is not as big of a difference than 1.020 or 1.023! When water in ur tank evaporates than ur level is gonna swing from 1.025 to 1.026 anyways until u add fresh water again
1.025 is a save area for fish and corrals if you calculate the swings in
yes, the refractometer Doesn't mark that 1.025 and 1.026, but 1.025 is still better visible with that bigger line
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Old 10-05-2011, 02:03 PM   #3
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I go with 1.025 for my tanks. As long as it is stable at one or other it will be fine.
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Old 10-05-2011, 04:27 PM   #4
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I keep mine at 35 ppt.

Ron Shimek's Website...Critters
"Coral reefs are generally located in areas that have salinities in the range of 35 ppt (1.026) to 38 ppt (1.029). Most of our corals, and the associated fauna including fishes, will live best at those conditions (Weber and White 1976)."
"The bottom line for salinities is simple. There is simply no reason at all to maintain the salinities of our systems below normal reef conditions. All reef inhabitants will suffer damage from prolonged exposure to lowered salinities. Invertebrates kept at low salinities often die within a few days to a few months. Given that corals, sea anemones, sponges and some other invertebrates have no old age or senescence (or to put it another way, they are immortal), low salinities result in a quick death. Some mollusks, crustaceans, and most fish kept at low salinities die of kidney failure; it just takes them longer. A fish which dies in a couple of years in a hyposaline aquarium may have had the potential to live more than 20 years had the salinity been appropriate."
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Old 10-05-2011, 05:21 PM   #5
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I keep mine at 35 ppt.

Ron Shimek's Website...Critters
"Coral reefs are generally located in areas that have salinities in the range of 35 ppt (1.026) to 38 ppt (1.029). Most of our corals, and the associated fauna including fishes, will live best at those conditions (Weber and White 1976)."
"The bottom line for salinities is simple. There is simply no reason at all to maintain the salinities of our systems below normal reef conditions. All reef inhabitants will suffer damage from prolonged exposure to lowered salinities. Invertebrates kept at low salinities often die within a few days to a few months. Given that corals, sea anemones, sponges and some other invertebrates have no old age or senescence (or to put it another way, they are immortal), low salinities result in a quick death. Some mollusks, crustaceans, and most fish kept at low salinities die of kidney failure; it just takes them longer. A fish which dies in a couple of years in a hyposaline aquarium may have had the potential to live more than 20 years had the salinity been appropriate."
Very interesting stuff, Larry. Nice to have some science behind the numbers. This along with the links is very useful stuff! BTW, your tank and stand builds are awesome.

Staying on topic, can you recommend any specific literature (in general) for less experienced hands... but who want a complete guide to proper setup and maintenance....that's up-to-date... recipes, etc and how-tos for keeping things on track... so much I've looked into seems lacking or very dense.

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Old 10-05-2011, 05:45 PM   #6
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You can find just about anything you want or need to know here....
Reef Chemistry Articles - Reef Central Online Community Archives
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Old 10-05-2011, 05:57 PM   #7
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I agree with Larry. Those are good links he gave you. I keep mine at 1.026 as this is supposed to be where Natural sea water is at.
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Old 10-05-2011, 06:10 PM   #8
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You can find just about anything you want or need to know here....
Reef Chemistry Articles - Reef Central Online Community Archives
An awesome archive. Thanks!!
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Old 10-05-2011, 06:14 PM   #9
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I agree with Larry. Those are good links he gave you. I keep mine at 1.026 as this is supposed to be where Natural sea water is at.
Yes. I was just now perusing them... almost a bit overwhelming but also well organized and cataloged.

I was also hoping to find something authoritative on fishless cycling but didn't come across it.

Any ideas?
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Old 10-05-2011, 07:24 PM   #10
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Really odd, so much conflicting info. I was also told 1.025 by my LFS. They said their natural salt water comes in at 1.027 so to add a little RO water with it. Mine's currently at 1.026.
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