Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 03-21-2007, 01:14 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 16
55g vs. 75g costs

I've been doing a lot of research the last few months and I was planning on getting a 55g for FOWLR and maybe add some low to mid light corals later on. I also plan on adding a DIY sump to my setup. I'm trying to keep this from being a very expensive hobby for now so I'm trying to give myself room to grow. My question is, ignoring the actual cost of the tanks, how much more can I expect to pay in supplies and electricity for a 75g vs. a 55g? I've noticed that for a 48" wide tank, the 75g isn't that much bigger. I plan on doing a lot of DIY items such as the sump, LR and the stand. Also, I live in an apartment and might be moving once a year for the next few years so I suppose the extra effort to move the tank that many times must be taken into account as well as potentially cheaper electricity than in a house. Thanks for your help!
__________________

__________________
cokemanj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 01:37 PM   #2
AA Team Emeritus
 
roka64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 13,860
Send a message via AIM to roka64 Send a message via Yahoo to roka64
Here are some Articles that may help. Initially the cost of starting is high. Once you are set up, the monthly cost is not that much, other than food, salt mix, and medications and, of course, the cost of new critters. Electricity will depend on your lighting, phs, heaters, pumps, but the main source would be the lights.
Here is another great Article for starting and maintaing a SW tank.
__________________

__________________
Age is relative, you are only as old as you act....of course, this works in reverse....

Questions loved, heeded advice greatly appreciated!

Vote for AA
Good reading about:
Nitrogen Cycle
Fishless Cycling
Need more help?
Articles
Acronym List

--Scott
roka64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 02:44 PM   #3
AA Team Emeritus
 
Ziggy953's Avatar



POTM Champion
Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Owings Mills, Maryland
Posts: 9,101
Excellent reading above!

If you aren't concerned about the cost of the tank its self and are looking for a 48" tank I would go ahead and get a 90g tank that is 48" long. With a FOWLR and some low light corals (mushrooms, some zoos ect) the cost is mainly going to be in your tank purchase. If you were going to have a full blown reef requiring high light then the cost goes up the larger the tank. The 75 or 90 is going to give you more front to back space and a little more height. With a 90 you have more options of fish and that much more water volume. Pumps and power heads are the same price no matter what tank you have. With a couple of Tunze Nano Streams (about $63) you could get all the flow you need, and then adding a sump will increase your water volume and flow that much more. The maintaince cost are going to be pretty close on a monthly basis. If you aren't running MH or other high power consuming lights then you elec cost wont be crazy. I have 570w of light on my tank and several pumps and phs and it cost me about $30 a month to run my tank. The only other cost I have is food and salt mix.

Summary:

If you want a 48" tank go with the 90, it gives you more room to grow!
__________________
Ziggy953 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 03:13 PM   #4
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 3,391
Send a message via Yahoo to tecwzrd
The jump to 90 gal can be costly if needing to light it for corals but from 55 to 75 it's minor. Also since you plan on moving multiple times in the next couple of years the smaller the tank the better.

The main advantage of the 75 over the 55 is the depth of the tank at 18". This allows tons of options for a DIY sump which the 12" 55 stand does not.

As already mentioned costs are going to be very close with those two tanks. The 90 gal is about 5" higher then the 55/75 and will require stronger lighting for corals which will increase your upfront lighting costs considerably and monthly costs slightly.
__________________
-Micah-

If you haven't figured it out yet I like to BOLD links :P

Vote for AA at Aqua Rank
tecwzrd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 03:42 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 16
Thanks for the advice so far. I've really gotten a lot of good information from here (including those articles roka mentioned). I too think the 90g will be a little more than I am able to handle now, but I didn't know they were the same width. That will give me an option to upgrade later and keep the same stand though. I didn't even think of the sump being easier with the deeper tank, I was mostly thinking of my LR placement. I want to be able to have the LR at the back and some open sand in the front and that would be difficult with only a foot to work with. Plus it will let me re-think some fish that I had to ignore due to size constraints.

So basically, I've got a couple opinions saying the cost difference between the 55g and 75g won't be too much. If anyone else agrees or has something else to add, I'd greatly appreciate the extra feedback.
__________________
cokemanj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 03:59 PM   #6
AA Team Emeritus
 
Ziggy953's Avatar



POTM Champion
Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Owings Mills, Maryland
Posts: 9,101
It is true that the cost diference isn't much between the 2, plus the lighting requirements will be similar if you decide to go reef from FOWLR. I would go with the 75. Like you said you want to have more room to aquascape. I have a 72g Bow and love it! FWIW, moving a tank over about 20g is a pain in the butt so be prepared! I missed your statement about the apartment and moving.

If you are not on the ground floor you may want to check with your property management to see if they will allow a tank at all! There is a lot of weight with even a 55g tank. You can figure on nearly 1000lbs when it's all said and done, tank, water, sand, rock, stand, sump ect. Just a litle food for thought.
__________________
Ziggy953 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 04:03 PM   #7
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 3,391
Send a message via Yahoo to tecwzrd
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziggy953
If you are not on the ground floor you may want to check with your property management to see if they will allow a tank at all!
Good point I learned the most about structural loads from this article.
__________________
-Micah-

If you haven't figured it out yet I like to BOLD links :P

Vote for AA at Aqua Rank
tecwzrd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 04:16 PM   #8
SW REEF 18+ YEARS
Community Admin
 
melosu58's Avatar



Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 38,244
I agree with going with the 75. You`ll have more room from front to back. Your start up cost should not be much more starting with the 75 gallon tank. The sump or refuge should help also with the added water volume. Hope all goes well. Welcome to AA
__________________

SITE ADMINISTRATOR

You can view many of my fish and corals in my photo albums in my profile.

View my tank


AA Community Rules|AA TOS

Forums 101 - posting, accounts, basics
melosu58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 04:25 PM   #9
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 16
Yeah, I've factored that stuff into the apartment. I am moving in August to a yet to be determined apt, so the tank will be a big factor in where I can go and what floor. But I will have to read that article about structural loads.

Is moving a tank almost too difficult? I read an article somewhere with some step-by-step way to do it. It seems mostly like you just need to pack up each fish carefully and drain water. I'm fine with spending an entire day to move my tank, but I don't want it to be so difficult that I risk losing fish or anything. I had planned on making a new topic with that question one day.
__________________
cokemanj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2007, 04:48 PM   #10
AA Team Emeritus
 
Ziggy953's Avatar



POTM Champion
Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Owings Mills, Maryland
Posts: 9,101
It's not impossible as people do it all the time. The thing is that it stresses the fish and corals out. If your tank is set up for any lenght of time say 8+months and you go to move it when you stir the sand up you will release a lot of nasties into the water. I moved my tank about 2 moths ago, I took all the rock out and saved all the water. I also had a lot of new SW mixed up and ready to go for PWCs. As long as you take your time and do it right with a lot of help you can manage!
__________________

__________________
Ziggy953 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
55 gallon, 75g

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Calculating the costs Aquarium1 Nano Reefs 58 09-13-2009 09:26 PM
cutting costs? Brad.Sedore Saltwater Reef Aquaria 13 01-21-2009 08:48 PM
sw setup maintenance costs QuietDusk Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started 9 08-02-2005 12:24 PM
Costs on Nano tank? Billsgate Nano Reefs 8 12-18-2004 11:58 AM
Electricy costs and usage. fishfreek Aquaria Off-Topic 8 04-25-2004 02:02 AM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.