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Old 02-16-2008, 01:37 PM   #31
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An increase in NO3 should trigger a partial water change with premixed SW. SG remains constant in a volume of water. The top off for evaporated water should be DI. That's where the auto top-off comes into play. When the float switch senses the drop in water it triggers the pumping of DI until the volume is back to normal.

I'd love to see what you come up when you have time (after hitting the lottery).
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Old 02-16-2008, 01:47 PM   #32
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I'd love to see what you come up when you have time (after hitting the lottery).
Specific ion electrodes have to be a couple hundred apiece.

ORP was mentioned, I was wondering what use that would be? ORP measures the amounts of oxidizeable substances in solution. In my world, I use ORP to measure the ratio of ferrous to ferric ion concentrations in paint baths, or chlorine (hypochlorite or hypochlorous acid) as a biological control agent in water. Perhaps a NO3/NO2 ratio? Hmmmm, both are oxidants however. Maybe total (non-ammonical) soluble nitrogen?
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Old 02-16-2008, 08:30 PM   #33
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ORP
"Generally ORP values above 400 mV are harmful to aquatic life. Ideally the ORP value in salt water aquariums should be kept between 350 and 390 mV. ORP levels below 300 mV are to be avoided. An oxidising environment is needed to convert any ammonia (NH3) to nitrites (NO2–) and nitrates (NO3–). Ammonia levels as low as 0.002 mg/l can be harmful to some fish species.
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Old 02-17-2008, 12:22 AM   #34
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Do I need a grounding rod? Is that for safety (immersion heater develops an internal short) or are there electric fields the critters find objectionable?
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Old 02-17-2008, 01:48 AM   #35
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You don't need one, but many folks have them to eliminate any stray voltage that might "leak" out from any of the equipment. Some types of fish seem more susceptible to voltage leaks than others.

Of course, you absolutely should have a GFCI (ground fault interrupt) somewhere in your system - either at the wall outlet itself, or as one of those extension cord types. Without one, the big critter taking care of the tank would be gone before the circuit breaker tripped out if there's a BIG voltage leak.
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Old 02-17-2008, 11:11 AM   #36
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I have one just for cheap insurance against stray voltage. I rely on the gfci for protection of me. I have felt a tingle when doing a water change and forgetting to shut off the heater that was in the pwc tank. The stainless steel heater was going bad (now dead) and leaking voltage.
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Old 02-18-2008, 01:01 PM   #37
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I believe I had stray voltage in my tank that nuked all my damsels overnight. A titanium grounding probe is insurance that will save you and your fish a lot of grief. O also have a GFCI on my power strip.
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Old 02-18-2008, 04:10 PM   #38
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I have my equipment hooked up to a power strip how do I know if it has a GFCI on it? I also heard somewhere that grounding rods can be harmful. It creates like a current or something. It's not the electricity that kills its the current.
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Old 02-18-2008, 04:41 PM   #39
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The majority of power strips don't have a GFCI on them. GFCIs are NOT the little overload trip buttons found on all power strips. Ones with a GFCI on them will have some big box-like thing somewhere with a "test" and a "reset" button. Here's one I found...

Shock Shield&#174 GFCI Protected Power Strip, 28224 - Lab Safety Supply

But because they're pretty spendy compared to a normal power strip, if you don't know if yours is one, it's probably safe to say it isn't!
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Old 02-18-2008, 05:22 PM   #40
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You can also get them at Lowes or HD.
I have never heard of a grounding probe introducing current back into the tank.
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