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Old 03-21-2008, 08:07 PM   #11
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If the rock was fully cured and you have ZERO ammonia, ZERO nitrites and ZERO to <40 ppm of nitrate then your tank is cycled. There are very little bacteria in the water column. Bacteria grow on a surface. Porous rock is ideal because it has so much surface area due to all the holes, nooks and crannies that run through it. The same with sand. Each grain of sand is a surface for bacteria to grow on.

Do you have your own test kits or are you taking water samples to the lfs?
Whenever you post about a problem in your tank the members here are going ask a bunch of questions and expect that water parameters will be given with actual numbers. Saying it is good does not tell us anything.

The best advice I ever got about my tank came from a member here. It is "nothing good every happens quickly in a salt water tank"!

If your tank is fully cycled then you are seeing a diatom bloom which is normal in a new tank. They will burn out shortly. They will probably be replaced by some other nuisance algae, but that's part of the process.

For now I would say you need double the quantity of rock you have. You should add it in small increments.

After you have all the rock in place you can get more livestock. Please get and use a QT for any new purchases to avoid contaminating the main tank with a parasite or disease.
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Old 03-21-2008, 11:35 PM   #12
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Update:

I checked my water when I got home and it is optimal.

Ammo: 0 ; Ph: 8.2; Nitrite: 0; Nitrate: 0

Is it possible to be cycled so quickly and completely avoid any major ammonia buildup due to just the rock and sand being in the a week
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Old 03-22-2008, 01:12 AM   #13
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If it was cured rock, it's totally possible.
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Old 03-22-2008, 01:26 AM   #14
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sweet because i didnt want to cause any stress to my clowns they look so perky and happy. I got under the impression cycling has to be a crazy long process. I am going to add more live rock tomorrow which should speed things along even further
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Old 03-22-2008, 01:34 AM   #15
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Sorry... from your other post where you said you were cycling, I just assumed you were. If you used cured live rock, and read no ammonia or nitrites, then you're probably OK. When I cycled my main tank, I used cured rock and only saw just a "blip" of ammonia and then nothing. Took less than a couple weeks.

If you're adding additional rock to an established tank, make sure it's fully cured or you'll most likely experience another small cycle. If your tank is really cycled (which it sounds like it is)... there's nothing really to "speed along".
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Old 03-22-2008, 01:39 AM   #16
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awesome. yes I dont think the levels could be any better, somehow. Thanks so much!
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Old 03-22-2008, 12:00 PM   #17
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Kurt beat me to it. Good quality fully cured LR form a local source really does give you a cycled tank in almost no time at all. I still prefer to add a bit of ammonia and cause a mini-cycle prior to adding any livestock. That just for the warm fuzzy feeling of seeing spikes and back to zero on all tests as insurance that the tank can handle a new bioload.

Congratulations! You are on your way. I will continue to caution you to go SLOWLY form here on out. Add more rock in small quantities (5 pounds at time?) till you get to your goal. Test the water every day for a week to see if you get any spikes, then add more rock. If you never get a spike you can probably increase the amount you add the next time IF it comes from the same batch at the LFS AND they have not added any new uncured rock to that system. Caution, (trust but verify) is the best policy.
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