Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 04-13-2014, 11:51 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
mikemc75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 165
Can you " jumpstart a cycle "

Is there any way to jumpstart a sw tank cycle ?
__________________

__________________
mikemc75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 12:24 AM   #2
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Andy Sager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Lake Wales, Florida
Posts: 5,955
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemc75 View Post
Is there any way to jumpstart a sw tank cycle ?
What do you mean by " jumpstart"? Adding any ammonia source will get the ball rolling but adding filter material or gravel from an established tank along with not adding a lot of fish in the beginning will eliminate "the cycle" entirely. So you need to be a bit more specific
__________________

__________________
Andy Sager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 12:28 AM   #3
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
mikemc75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 165
How should I start ? Ordered live rock. Not looking to put fish or coral in. Just want to start right. Can get. Cycled water and or media. But not shore what way to go or what's the best way to go
__________________
mikemc75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 01:10 AM   #4
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Dmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 273
You can use live sand, live rock and some dr tims one and only bacteria. Will have a mini cycle but wont be long

dino
__________________
Dmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 01:16 AM   #5
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Andy Sager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Lake Wales, Florida
Posts: 5,955
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemc75 View Post
How should I start ? Ordered live rock. Not looking to put fish or coral in. Just want to start right. Can get. Cycled water and or media. But not shore what way to go or what's the best way to go
What's the "right " way depends on your ultimate goal. What do you plan putting in this tank? Live rock (if it hasn;t been cured) will produce some ammonia in your tank. Make sure you have a good test kit to keep tabs on PH, ammonia, nitrites and nitrates so you can actually see the rise and fall of ammonia and nitrites and the rise of nitrates. If the rock is cured and there is nothing to die off on the rock, you may need to add some life to the tank just so that the beneficial bacteria in the live rock have some ammonia source to feed off of.
I'm old school and believe that the right way is the slow, natural way. But in today's hobby, faster ways are available and they are not necessarily wrong ways. The bottom line is you need to establish a bacteria bed to support the life you are adding to the tank. Whatever method(s) you use to get to that point is the "right" way and you may need to adjust your plans or schedule depending on which way you use. Trying to skip this is the only wrong way.
I strongly suggest you do some research on setting up and, more importantly, maintaining a marine fish tank. Once you know what to do and why to do it, you should feel more confident with your tank.

Hope this helps
__________________
Andy Sager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 01:23 AM   #6
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Dmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 273
http://www.reefs.org/library/newbieguide.html

Good read

dino
__________________
Dmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 08:44 AM   #7
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Macscale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Lakewood Ranch, Florida.
Posts: 2,850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Sager View Post
What's the "right " way depends on your ultimate goal. What do you plan putting in this tank? Live rock (if it hasn;t been cured) will produce some ammonia in your tank. Make sure you have a good test kit to keep tabs on PH, ammonia, nitrites and nitrates so you can actually see the rise and fall of ammonia and nitrites and the rise of nitrates. If the rock is cured and there is nothing to die off on the rock, you may need to add some life to the tank just so that the beneficial bacteria in the live rock have some ammonia source to feed off of.
I'm old school and believe that the right way is the slow, natural way. But in today's hobby, faster ways are available and they are not necessarily wrong ways. The bottom line is you need to establish a bacteria bed to support the life you are adding to the tank. Whatever method(s) you use to get to that point is the "right" way and you may need to adjust your plans or schedule depending on which way you use. Trying to skip this is the only wrong way.
I strongly suggest you do some research on setting up and, more importantly, maintaining a marine fish tank. Once you know what to do and why to do it, you should feel more confident with your tank.

Hope this helps

It's doesn't matter whether the rock is cured or not when it comes to producing enough ammonia for the cycle. Either way you have to add an ammonia source to get your ammonia up to at least 4ppm.
__________________
55g Reef Build
Macscale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 08:55 AM   #8
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Dmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 273
http://reefs.org/ops/wade/ammoniacycle.jpg

A cycle is a process whereby bacteria are shifting their populations in both total numbers and in population types to deal with new food sources. When a tank is new and live rock has just been added, the die-off from the rock breaks down and releases ammonia. That ammonia is taken up by one type of bacteria and given off as nitrite. The nitrite goes through the same process and then is released as nitrate. Those processes happen in the presence of oxygen. Deep in the sand and rock, another type of bacteria exist in low oxygen areas that convert the nitrate to nitrogen. Nitrogen is completely non-toxic and can leave the system as a gas. That is the way in which our tanks cycle. If you start a tank with cured live rock (if truly cured and lacks large clumps of plant or sponge or the like material), then no cycle may be witnessed. If livestock is added slowly, the bacterial populations increase on demand without stressing the system.

Ammonia and nitrite are highly toxic compound generated from decaying matter and from fish waste. If a tank has any detectable ammonia or nitrite, you should not have any living animals present. Ammonia is more toxic in saltwater than in freshwater due to the higher pH of saltwater.

Our recommendation in this day and age is to NOT use livestock of any form to induce a cycle in a tank. Use live rock, cured or uncured, it matters not. Do NOT use dead animals either, it's the same reason. They are both methods from the past that have no place in today's reefing world. Forcing a cycle is not a real benefit if you stock slowly and properly and monitor a young reef tank. Many even believe that no swimming animals should be added until after a few months have passed. More on that later. The reason that you need no more than live rock is twofold: first, the rock already has a full complement of the bacteria you will need to get the tank going and secondly, there is enough 'matter' on the rock to provide 'food' for the bacteria that are the reason your tank is cycling.



dino
__________________
Dmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 08:56 AM   #9
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Dmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 273
http://www.reefs.org/library/newbieguide.html

dino
__________________
Dmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2014, 09:22 AM   #10
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
mikemc75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 165
Thank you for all the help.
__________________

__________________
mikemc75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cycle, star, start

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Would you like to give me some substrate to jumpstart my cycle? (Hampton Roads area) dlwn88 Mid Atlantic & the Virginia's 5 03-21-2011 12:49 PM
How to Jumpstart Coraline Growth jonboyb Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started 10 11-04-2008 10:34 AM
Cycle Jumpstart Question Thaiboxer Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 4 10-08-2006 12:02 PM
jumpstart cycling deepwater Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 6 10-30-2004 04:48 PM
seeding my new tank to jumpstart cycle rubysoho Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 6 10-25-2004 10:48 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.