Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 10-02-2004, 10:21 PM   #11
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Western NY
Posts: 610
Send a message via ICQ to Bang Guy
Clownfishes is a great book.

To answer an earlier question, starting with just feeding the Larvae Cyclop-Eeze is very risky. Typically they need a live food to get their eating instincts going. After a week or so they are able to eat the freeze dried Cyclop-eeze if it's ground to a powder.

Rotifers are a good food to start with but the Rotifers must be fed a high quality algae.
__________________

__________________
If you wake up breathing CONGRATULATIONS!!! You get another chance to do it right.
Bang Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2004, 10:40 PM   #12
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Corpus Christi, TX
Posts: 128
Yep. Most species of cultured finfish feed like that for first feeding. They are attracted to the movement. That's why I said to get a rotifer culture going or an Artemia culture established. IMO, larval brine shrimp would be great. They are nutritionally acceptable. Adult Artemia brine shrimp OTOH are nutritionally empty for all intents and purposes, but they can be used to incite a feeding response.
When you start algal and rotifer cultures, make very sure that you don't let the rotifer culture contaminate the algal culture. This may sound like a no-brainer, but it is more likely than you may think. Use separate glassware, filtration, and utensils to deal with each culture. Contamination of your algal culture with a few rotifers can result in the destruction of the algal culture. Where I work, we have huge cylindrical tanks with wall lighting for algal and rotifer cultures. We also have separate equipment for both cultures. We use rotifers for larval rearing experiments with Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).
Another thing that you should seriously consider is the timing of the larval hatch and collection. You have to time it right so you can collect them. Some aquaculturists use a flashlight and beaker. You can shine the light on the surface of the water and the larvae will flock to the light...it's called a phototactic response. With the larvae at the surface of the water, you can CAREFULLY skim them off in a 250 mL beaker or similar piece of glassware.
__________________

__________________
"If you don't fish, you should..."
diverdown69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2004, 10:35 AM   #13
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Western NY
Posts: 610
Send a message via ICQ to Bang Guy
I just want to caution that larval Brine Shrimp (Artemia nauplii) are too large for newly hatched Clownfish. Something the size of Rotifers is required for the first several days, longer for many species of Clownfish.

OTOH, Artemia nauplii are perfect for newborn Banggai Cardinalfish.
__________________
If you wake up breathing CONGRATULATIONS!!! You get another chance to do it right.
Bang Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2004, 10:33 AM   #14
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Corpus Christi, TX
Posts: 128
I didn't realize that the Artemia naups would be too large for a first feeding. They are used regularly for many other species of fish and inverts.
Looks like you learn something new everyday after all.
__________________
"If you don't fish, you should..."
diverdown69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2004, 11:41 AM   #15
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Western NY
Posts: 610
Send a message via ICQ to Bang Guy
I'm mostly familiar with the Ocellaris but other Clownfish are very similar. I feed them Rotifers for 14 days but I start mixing in the nauplii at day 7 or 8.
__________________
If you wake up breathing CONGRATULATIONS!!! You get another chance to do it right.
Bang Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2004, 12:02 PM   #16
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Corpus Christi, TX
Posts: 128
What kind of survivability do you get from the average brood?
__________________
"If you don't fish, you should..."
diverdown69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2004, 12:55 PM   #17
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Western NY
Posts: 610
Send a message via ICQ to Bang Guy
The last batch was over 80% but that's not typical for me. Usually it's 25 - 30%.
__________________
If you wake up breathing CONGRATULATIONS!!! You get another chance to do it right.
Bang Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2004, 01:06 PM   #18
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Corpus Christi, TX
Posts: 128
Honestly, high survivabilities like that don't really surprise me that much. I have heard of survivabilites between 80-90% with Premna and Amphiprion. IMHO, it all depends on the water quality and how well you are able to collect the newly hatched larvae. Speaking of, how do you collect them? Do you use the flashlight and beaker method or do you collect them in an overflow tank?
__________________
"If you don't fish, you should..."
diverdown69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2004, 01:53 PM   #19
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Western NY
Posts: 610
Send a message via ICQ to Bang Guy
Neither. I fashioned an incubation chamber using an air pump, PVC tubing, and a plastic oil pan. I put the rock the eggs are on in the chamber a day or two before they are due to hatch.
__________________
If you wake up breathing CONGRATULATIONS!!! You get another chance to do it right.
Bang Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2004, 02:55 PM   #20
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Corpus Christi, TX
Posts: 128
Interesting set up. I asked that because the systems that I have seen for finfish culture are set up to allow the larvae (and even fertile eggs at times) to be removed from the breeding tank through an overflow/skimmer of sorts. Once the eggs are removed from the tank, they are taken to the larval rearing tanks. The LRT's are very tightly controlled in terms of WQ, temp, and lighting. As for actual tanks, these things are nothing more than a bunch of 20-gal circular tanks with a standpipe and fine mesh net in the middle. Lighting consists of an incandescent bulb and a reflector. The room temperature and humidity is very tightly controlled as well. They use powerheads to circulate the water ever so gently.
The best system like this I have seen was the one I saw at Sea Center Texas last week. They were culturing red drum, speckled trout, flounder, and even TARPON! The systems were set up such that they could control photoperiod in each tank individually so that they had a constant cycle of spawning and larvae/egg removal. One tank might be spawning while the others were in a resting phase. This sort of set up (lighting control) could very easily be duplicated for hobbyist use with small AC timers or even a computer if the hobbyist was so inclined. The shrimp culture facility where I work has much the same sort of system with open top tanks and computer controlled lighting.
__________________

__________________
"If you don't fish, you should..."
diverdown69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
breed, breeding, clown

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Breeding Clown Fish dannyb Saltwater Reef Aquaria 7 10-19-2009 02:38 PM
Breeding Rift Valley Lake Cichlid Breeding colematthewmalaka Freshwater & Brackish - Breeding 3 02-15-2009 12:40 PM
Clown Fish basics-breeding Saltwater T Saltwater Reef Aquaria 7 05-20-2008 03:02 PM
clown breeding bluefishyjoe Saltwater Fish Only & FOWLR 6 05-24-2006 12:19 AM
Percula Clown breeding scottshipm Saltwater Reef Aquaria 1 03-08-2004 09:54 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.