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Old 08-11-2011, 10:32 AM   #1
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Corals and temperature

How sensitive to higher temperatures are corals? I know that the ideal temp for a reef tank is about 78, but consistency is more more important. My tank gets to about 83-84 with the lights on and then drops to about 81 with the lights off. Are the hardier corals able to adapt to higher temps?

My parents keep the ac at 78, my goal is to get it to 78 with lights off and about 81-82 with them on. I plan on adding fans to increase air circulation in my hood.
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Old 08-11-2011, 11:15 AM   #2
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Ive actually read that corals do better at higher temps 82-84 as it's closer to their natural environment. I've been keeping mine at 80-83 as it's the easiest range to keep stable when accounting for my lights and room temp.

I would think a more stable temp with minimal diurnal variations is more important than a specific temp as long as either are in the 76-84 range.
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Old 08-11-2011, 07:35 PM   #3
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That's what I was thinking, that stability was more important. I'm gonna see if adding a fan will keep a constant temp.
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Old 08-11-2011, 07:50 PM   #4
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84 is a bit high. i have read the opposite, that corals tend to color better and do better in 77-79 degree temps. i do agree that keeping the temp stable is crucial. any temp, alk, ph swings can wipe out corals.
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Old 08-11-2011, 08:12 PM   #5
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From my understanding, it's debatable on either side - high or low, but stability being key. Higher temps are closer to the natural conditions found thus would be ideal for growth BUT in a poorly maintained system, it could be problematic.

At higher temps, salt water loses some ability to absorb dissolved O2 added to that, fish and coral metabolic rates increase, creating more waste & using the dissolved O2 faster.

Higher temps result in faster growth but also higher impact of bio load and O2 use. It's a trade off either way, but stability probably has more impact long term.
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Old 08-11-2011, 08:47 PM   #6
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what are the average temps in Indonesian and Australian waters? Kupang, which is bringing in a lot of corals these days, is 80.6 Fahrenheit, while Australia has an average of 70, but a max of 82. i don't think 82 is the norm, but Aussie has the most colorful corals.....
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Old 08-11-2011, 08:52 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_X View Post
84 is a bit high. i have read the opposite, that corals tend to color better and do better in 77-79 degree temps. i do agree that keeping the temp stable is crucial. any temp, alk, ph swings can wipe out corals.
+1 for the lower temp. I have also read that proper water temp. should be between 76-79 degrees. Corals can handle cooler water far better than warmer water.
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Old 08-11-2011, 09:33 PM   #8
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I agree try to mimic as close to natural as possible. However iv snorkeled in the caribbean many times where temp is 85 to 86 degrees I think lower temps bring out the color but higher temps I think stimulate growth just my idea..
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Old 08-13-2011, 09:03 PM   #9
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So it's both lol. I'm gonna see if I can keep my temp consistent and go from there
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Old 08-13-2011, 09:08 PM   #10
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Yeah, the Caribbean is really warm, but I don't see very much coral coming from there. Most coral I see are from Fiji, marshal islands, Indonesia and Australia.
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