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Old 07-31-2003, 12:24 PM   #1
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cyano

HI all.

Ok, so if I manage to eradicate my tank of the dreaded "CYANO", then the problem should not reoccur as long as I don't introduce anything from a tank that has it, say, from my lfs. Is this correct?

I would think that since it is a bacteria, it is not created in the tank but rather enhanced by say overfeeding and raised Phosphate levels and poor water qualities.

What do you think?

Howard.
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Old 07-31-2003, 01:48 PM   #2
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that is incorrect. It does not get "brought in" by anything. Your tank situation is what creates it, and ultimately, what will make it go away.
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Old 07-31-2003, 02:18 PM   #3
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Very interesting. I have been fighting it for quite some time now and have changed or altered many things to combat it. I watch the Phosphates and never let them get to high before I do a water change. I have cut down on my feeding and have quit giving frozen brine. I now only feed flake. I don't supplement my Inverts as often as I did. I even cut down on the light duration each day. None of this seemed to have any effect on the Cyano.

I finallyresorted to using an additive. Definitely a last resort!! I used Chemi-clean. I treated once and my cyano went away. It had no adverse effect on my Fish or inverts or good algae.

I was hoping by getting rid of it and not reintroducing it , I would not see a reimmergence. Now you say that it is created in the invironment. I still haven't determined what started it in the first place. If I am to starve it out, I have to find what is feeding it.?.?.?

Do you think that regular flour light combined with actinic could be aiding in the problem? It only seemed to grow in the lighted areas of the tank, not under my LR or in the shadows of my colt coral and such.

Howard
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Old 07-31-2003, 02:26 PM   #4
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cutting down on light will not affect cyano (except by shutting it off completely for several days.) and only then if the other conditions have been removed. If you have ANY phosphate reading, then it is enough to permit cyano to grow, same as nitrate. What started it in the first place were conditions to make it happy...nitrates, phosphates, low water flow areas...
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Old 07-31-2003, 03:13 PM   #5
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What creates phosphates? When I do a water change I reduce my phosphates to 0.00 and in a few days they are up to 0.25 . They are never above this, but apparently that is enough to cause Cyano. My amonia, nitrite, nitrate levels all remain at 0.00 and my PH runs between 8.2 &8.6 . (That is as close as the PH tester I have will get).

What about the feeding? How much, how often? I only feed once a day, and I feed them only what they can consume. No food ever has a chance to reach the SB.
I am using Omega flake. I don't know much about the nutritional values needed, but I was told that flake food is healthier for them. I can't get live brine in my area and I learned that frozen has a lot of phosphates and very little nutritional value.

What are your thoughts?

Also....Thank you for all yout time and shared knowledge. Saltwater is not a very popular thing here in the "back of beyond" so there really is no local source of good info. We newbies appreciate all the great input you experienced "saltys'" have to offer.

Howard
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Old 07-31-2003, 05:06 PM   #6
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FYI, cyanobacteria is neither a bacteria nor is it an algae. It has traits from both types but is not considered a true type of either family.

Feedings will generate some of the phosphates, but IME flake foods contribute little or none. They are the primary source I feed my tank.

There are a few other things you could look into as possible causes. Age of lights, how long they run, do you have proper actinic bulbs? Cyano does not do well in the 420-430 nm spectrum and 50/50 or daylights can be quite a fuel source.

Water flow and chemistry will also come into play. It is hard for cyano to become established in high flow areas and tends to stick with dead spots. Increased flow will do wonders. As well it will not multiply as quickly if higher alk is maintained. This can be a key factor as the snails and such will have a much easier time at eliminating it if they can eat it faster than it grows. FYI, true turbo snails eat it like candy.

One thing I also discovered some time back, is that certain resin/carbon products if not replaced often enough will promote these types of blooms quite out of nowhere. I usually use it as a sign my chemi-pure needs changing. It will often clear up a day or two later.

HTH
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Old 07-31-2003, 05:32 PM   #7
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Most of the phosphates I have found came from me using tap water(city water) for top off water... The tap water from our tap has a little amount of phosphate in it... The thing that is most disturbing, is that the silicate content is very high... I believe that the Cyano likes that also, and when it cannot get the phosphate or nitrate it needs, it will eat silicates and thrive... This I found to be one of the main sources of my problem... I also wondered why I had so much sponge growing on the underside of my rocks and in the shadows.... Silicates.... If your phosphate and nitrates, are below minimum, and Cyano is still there strong, then I would test for Silicates... There may be a link there, and you can remedy the situation...

Also, having a refugium with ample amounts of the right kind of macro algae, will reduce the compounds that Cyano likes, and thus, reduce the likelyhood of it coming back..
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Old 07-31-2003, 10:45 PM   #8
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I don't know that I have true turbos or not. I think they are really torchus. They spend most of their time on my LR and on the glass. They have never been on the SB that I have noticed. As for my water, I use my well water and it is very good quality. I test 0.00 on ammonia, phosphates, nitrates and nitrites.

I 2 PH's in my 55g. One blows like heck and the other is not as powerful but has a good airator.

I have not seen a tester for silicate. I have a LSB so I know that it is not silicate but I don't know what else might be in the tank.

I have new lights coming this week. They are PC 10,000K...460NM. I really don'y know what all that means, but I think they must be better than what I run now.
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Old 07-31-2003, 11:38 PM   #9
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460 nm is the wavelength of the bulb measured in nanometers. It is actually a good rage.

nm of a 10 k bulb


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Old 08-01-2003, 01:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
I have a LSB so I know that it is not silicate but I don't know what else might be in the tank.
I have a LSB also, this does not mean that you would not have silicate in the tank. It can also be introduced to the tank by way of water changes and top offs...The theory that Sand leeches silicates into the tank, has been thrown around quite a bit, and if I am not mistaken, the results have been that little of not no silicates to a harmful degree leech out. Some silicate is ok to have in the tank, however, too high of saturation, can cause nuisance algae and organisms to appear..

Salifert makes a test kit for Silicates

Quote:
I use my well water and it is very good quality
Coming out of the ground, if unfiltered through RO/DI process, I can almost guarantee that you have silicates present... this is where they come from mostly...
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