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Old 12-18-2011, 01:12 AM   #1
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deep sand bed for a 125 fowlr?

does anyone have an opinion on the subject?
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Old 12-18-2011, 02:43 AM   #2
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i do, it won't hurt to have one, a healthier system for your fish makes for happy healthy longer living fish
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:01 AM   #3
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thank you.
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Old 12-18-2011, 08:14 AM   #4
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I did a Dsb in my cube and my 72, I based it off a lot of research. I decided for my 194g that I won't be doing a Dsb in display or the sump. I will fill the sump with rock. The Dsb looks messy to me, it helps reduce nitrates, but only if not disturbed, most people like gobies, etc that disrupt the sandbed. There are other ways to reduce nitrates that won't cause potential catastrophic results.

Why I changed my idea on DSB:
1. I had a powerhead fall and create a horrible mess in the sand, if the tank had been any older it would have crashed. Accidents happen.
2. I want to run my tank as long as possible, we are talking 20-30 years, and there are no tanks this old that ran a Dsb, actually some of those people said they could get about 5-7 years and then things would start going downhill.
3. I want a large goby and they tend to eat the creatures in the sand that provide the mechanism for converting nitrates to nitrogen gas.

I have to say, both tanks once set up had zero nitrates after about two months, with over feeding and irregular water changes.
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Old 12-18-2011, 09:21 AM   #5
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I`m not talking it down but you can have healthier and longer living fish in a one inch substrate also. I have had fish that were 13 yrs old and they died because of Hurricane Irene. My substrate is only an inch deep.
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Old 12-18-2011, 02:11 PM   #6
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why is it that tanks with a dsb do not last as long as those with out? i mean that if one was better than another or what not there would never be the question of dsb or no. you know? kind of like water, if you want a fish you need water. its an absolute.
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:14 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeetwitch
why is it that tanks with a dsb do not last as long as those with out? i mean that if one was better than another or what not there would never be the question of dsb or no. you know? kind of like water, if you want a fish you need water. its an absolute.
I think it comes down to having to replenish the living organisms, not messing with it (or having a powerhead fall) and just the setup of them in general, there is no real consensus on doing them, so they get setup differently. I really hoped to find a tank that had one long term but I could not.

If you are planning on changing the tank within a few years, don't mind the lost water volume or viewing area, then give it a try. Or, do a remote one in a sump or refugium. Do you have high nitrates?
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:23 PM   #8
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the tank doesnt have any fish yet nor have i started to cycle, so no nitrates at all.
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Old 12-18-2011, 05:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leftyfish View Post
...they could get about 5-7 years and then things would start going downhill...
Looks like I'm in that 5-7yr window, my reef tank (with 3.5"-4.5" sandbed) has been running for over 5 years...no issues...yet.

Quote:
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I want a large goby and they tend to eat the creatures in the sand that provide the mechanism for converting nitrates to nitrogen gas.
The nitrate to nitrogen gas process in the DSB is performed by microscopic anaerobic bacteria residing in (and requiring) an environment several inches beneath the surface of the sand. Maybe the goby's impact on the process is just disturbence of this oxygen-free environment rather than the consumption of creatures?
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Old 12-18-2011, 05:41 PM   #10
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i've never utilized a DSB for filtration. for this current tank i do, sort of have a dsb. it's 6" of sand, but it's in between a lot of limestone the size of ballast (pics in the build thread). will it cause me problems? we'll see, but it's doubtful since it's only a temporary tank until i can construct something larger. after the winter.

i've heard conflicting info about deep beds. some say that they don't last long (as stated above), then others say they offer excellent nitrate reduction with very little maintenance. they say you must stir the top a bit here and there, so a sand sifting fish would not be detrimental to it...on the contrary, they would be a help, as long as it wasn't an engineer goby or something that digs giant holes and buries corals and rock on a daily basis.

my argument is - why doesn't the sand bottom of the ocean nuke it? it's super deep. shouldn't it be spewing poisons on a regular basis?
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