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Old 07-11-2003, 12:12 AM   #1
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DSB Advice Needed

I have a 72 gallon tank with 60lbs of LS, a sponge filter, and a power head running. I have read so much lately I am a bit confused. It sounds like a DSB is the way to go. I am planning on heading over to Home Depot tomorrow to look for the southdown to get my sand bed to the full depth. I know that I need to cycle the tank, however, besides cycling the tank and picking up some LR, what other filters, etc are recommended for a DSB?

Also, do I need to purchase a cleanup crew or will the cleanup crew naturally come about once I place the LR in the tank?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-11-2003, 01:49 AM   #2
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Sleeks

Over the years, I've been in the hobby 56 years and strictly salt for 26 years, I've tried every imaginable combination of things to try to gain more success with marine creatures. IMHO, the DSB is the way to go. I'm currently running a 100 gal system with DSB and a sump, also with a DSB, and a protein skimmer. The tank has been setup for 16 months and is doing very well. If you are interested you can view a progression of photos at my website......The cultured Reef

Southdown sand is the sand of my choice and HD is the place to get it, if you can find it.

As far as a clean up crew goes, I'd get the sand and LR in and wait for a couple of weeks. Then go ahead and get a clean up crew. The best advice I can give you is GO SLOW. The only thing that happens in a hurry in a marine tank is disaster. Read, read, read everything you can get your hands on.

The best book for beginners and old salts alike has just been published. It's title is "Reef Invertebrates" by Anthony Calfo and Robert Fenner. I received an advance copy and this book is huge, full of color pictures and is the most comprehensive book I've read. (I'm about half way through.) The authors cover DSBs extensively.

It's suggested retail price is $42.95 plus shipping (A hefty price.) but, you can find it for less. I have it for sale on my website for $32 plus shipping. If you are interested you can see the book by clicking here.

I hope I've been of some help to you.


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Old 07-11-2003, 09:35 AM   #3
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The most recomended book for biginners IMO, and my recomendation would be "The Conscientious Marine Aquarist" by Robert M Fenner.
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Old 07-11-2003, 11:13 AM   #4
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The most recomended book for biginners IMO, and my recomendation would be "The Conscientious Marine Aquarist" by Robert M Fenner.
You will find Reef Invertebrates and the upcoming books in the series to be pretty much a needed update to the TCMA book.
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Old 07-11-2003, 11:14 AM   #5
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first I'd like to welcome you both to AquariumAdvice!

secondly, sleeks, I'll second what amphibious has said about reading and being patient. Especialy in the first stages of a tanks life.

there are a number of recommended books here.
as far as the "Reef Invertibrates" book i think a first time may be better off with a more general book. I have not read the Reef Invertibrates but the sample chapter given does look well done.

lastly... you said 72 gal and "a power head" just one? whats the flow rate on that? You will most likely need more than a single power head.
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Old 07-11-2003, 02:04 PM   #6
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Thanks for the advice.

I will check out the suggested books. I have been doing a lot of reading on this site and others and find everyones comments helpful. I am being patient (it is difficult), but the last thing I want to do is kill fish.

So for a DSB, besides the sand bed, which I am planning on having at least 4" deep, I need a protein skimmer (which I should not use at first to help the tank cycle faster) and possibly another powerhead (to ensure good water flow).

A couple more questions:

How much flow is needed? Is there a good rule of thumb?

Do I need the sponge filter?

Do I need a sump?

Is any other filtration (besides the DSB) needed?

I realize that most of these questions would be answered in the books listed by everyone and I am going to be ordering them today but was hoping to get a jump start.

Also, my tank is rather cloudy. Is this just due to the sand settling (it is smoky looking)

Thanks in advance

-Brian
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Old 07-11-2003, 04:33 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Sleeks
How much flow is needed? Is there a good rule of thumb?
This can very greatly depending on what you plan to keep in the tank. An average tank needs 10 x volume in flow (eg a 50 gallon tank would need 500gph flow total) this is also subject to some opinion, i'm sure you'll hear more. :o)

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Do I need the sponge filter?
Depends on your deffinition of "need" ;o) you can probably do without.

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Do I need a sump?
not crucial to life, but makes things easier on the tank and your critters. as reduces the fluctuation in water quality as well as provides more DSB area for denitrification.
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Is any other filtration (besides the DSB) needed?
with a DSB and protien skimmer you'll be fine, add a refuge and you'll be even better off.

Quote:
Also, my tank is rather cloudy. Is this just due to the sand settling (it is smoky looking)
most likely. It usually takes a number of days when you first set up the tank for all the sand silt to settle out. don't fret.
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