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Old 10-02-2012, 01:35 AM   #141
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Doesn't "do" anything really. But by not mixing the two, you have less likelihood of killing off sand life.
There is no easy way to tell how often you'll need to top it off. There are too many factors. Water temp, air temp, air flow, ambient humidity, etc. I'm sure calculus can solve it. I haven't taken calculus yet. Lol
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Old 10-02-2012, 01:57 AM   #142
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So I don't really need the calcite sand then? Because its ugly! But I prob don't have enough live sand to cover the bottom of the tank. Hmm.
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Old 10-02-2012, 02:16 AM   #143
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I avg a gal a day to top off evaporation on 37 gal tank
as for sand you can always add more as you cycle
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Old 10-02-2012, 02:20 AM   #144
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In the strictest sense, you don't "need" sand at all. But it does provide benefits. If you don't like the calcite, don't use it. An inch all across the tank is a good depth for a shallow sand bed. Need more? Buy dry and save!
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Old 10-03-2012, 01:08 AM   #145
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What is the difference between hard corals and soft corals? What is the recommended way to acclimate and transfer new fish to the tank? Do corals get glued into place to look pretty or is it just where they happen to rest? #stupidquestions
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Old 10-03-2012, 01:52 AM   #146
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Well, to be technical, I'd have to get into taxonomy and use terms like sceratinian, octocoral, etc., but I'm reasonably sure that's not what you are asking for. I'll break it down into generalizations about appearance and care requirements. These are ONLY generalizations!
Soft Corals generally include mushrooms (not true corals at all), leathers, tree corals, zooanthids, gorgonians, etc. With the exception of some gorgonians, these are some of the easiest to care for. They can get by with less light and little to no supplemental feeding. Excellent starter corals. Some can grow like weeds, though. Kenya Tree corals drop branches which become new corals, and can be difficult to get rid of. Zooanthids can spread across a rock rather quickly with good water quality and lighting. Mushrooms bud often. They are characterized by having no skeleton and consisting entirely of soft tissue.
Hard corals can be broken into two VERY subjective categories with little taxonomical rhyme or reason.
Large Polyp Stony Corals include such favorite as brain corals, blastomussa, torch, hammer, frogspawn, elegance, etc. LPS corals usually have higher light requirements (some non photosynthetic exceptions exist, such as the Sun Coral tubastraea) and needing more water flow and higher lighting. Again, merely generalizations. These corals are characterized by secreting a calcium carbonate skeleton from which extend lrge fleshy polyps. Consider the torch coral, which grows long branching stalks of what is essentially stone, with large fleshy tentacles emerging from the tips.
Small Polyp Stony corals are often the most demanding animals in the aquarium, requiring generally higher lighting and pristine water quality, combined with high, turbulent flow. Montipora corals are among the easiest of these to care for. These corals are easily recognized by consisting mostly of skeleton, which is almost completely encased in a thin layer of colored tissue from which tiny polyps can be observed.
Though there are exceptions, soft corals are easiest, with SPS being the hardest. I recommend starting with softies and maybe some LPS before attempting to care for SPS corals.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:51 PM   #147
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicoleIsStoked
What is the difference between hard corals and soft corals? What is the recommended way to acclimate and transfer new fish to the tank? Do corals get glued into place to look pretty or is it just where they happen to rest? #stupidquestions
Imo sps are easiest only require strong lighting and strong water movement no feeding
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:44 PM   #148
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Ah you guys are the best. Thank you so much for all the help so far. I added the live sand earlier this afternoon and am possibly getting a bunch of dry base rock for $20 in the next day or so from a friend. I really scraping the bottom of the bin for funds at this point lol. Gotta be careful I won't be able to buy fish. Can anyone help with acclimation advice?
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Old 10-04-2012, 12:41 AM   #149
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For hardier fish you can:
Put bag in aquarium and temp. acclimate them for 15 -30 minutes
Then add 1/2 cup of water from your tank to the bag every so often until it's full, then discard about half of the water and repeat
OR
For more sensitive or anything really:
Drip acclimate by using air hosing (put one end in tank, can hold with a magnet cleaner, and other end in bucket) and a valve or tie knots in it. Then suck one end to get water to flow into a bucket. First tilt the bucket by putting something under it. Then put the organism in the bucket and the water. Get the drip to 1-3 drops per second and wait a 1/2 hour. Then empty half of the water and you can wait longer if you want. For more sensitive creatures you can do 2 hours+. This is my fav. method.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:14 AM   #150
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Quote:
Originally Posted by obscurereef
For hardier fish you can:
Put bag in aquarium and temp. acclimate them for 15 -30 minutes
Then add 1/2 cup of water from your tank to the bag every so often until it's full, then discard about half of the water and repeat
OR
For more sensitive or anything really:
Drip acclimate by using air hosing (put one end in tank, can hold with a magnet cleaner, and other end in bucket) and a valve or tie knots in it. Then suck one end to get water to flow into a bucket. First tilt the bucket by putting something under it. Then put the organism in the bucket and the water. Get the drip to 1-3 drops per second and wait a 1/2 hour. Then empty half of the water and you can wait longer if you want. For more sensitive creatures you can do 2 hours+. This is my fav. method.
Is it okay to put them in the tank using a net?
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