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Old 12-09-2012, 01:58 PM   #1
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Question Need Guidance On Getting Started.

So far I got my choices of fish i'd like to have a go at. They are
Ocellaris Clownfish, Pajama Cardinal, Green Chromis. I plan on housing each species in their own tank. with coral an reefs. Eventually would like to breed them some to keep my tanks populated. but for now I think I just want to do
Ocellaris Clownfish an get that tank established 1st. But what I can't decide on is size of tank because each site I've read contradicts the site I previously read which now has me more confused then I was when I started lol.
so far I've looked at the bio cube nano tank 29 Gallon it says got every thing you basically need to get started then I read the reviews an it sounds like you need alot of other things. any advice on the bio cube? I've also thought of getting a 55 or 75 gallon tank with a metal stand that could hold another tank so once I was ready to do another I could with out using extra space or sit maybe a small 1o gallon or 2 or 3 if can on piece plywood on bottom shelf for future breeder tank once I manage to keep the main tank healthy first. so breeding i figure atleast 2-3 years away yet due to having a ton to learn for salt water. I heard that bigger is better in the saltwater world heard was easier to keep balance in tank better is this true? Also looking for advice on easiest corals an reefs to keep alive. I know to use live rock in tank but heard conflicting statements on how much to use. can you tell me how much I should use per gallon of tank?
Which is better sand or subtrate I use a python to clean my tanks. I understand though I can't fill tank back up with python an need to have buckets pre mixed with salt few days in advance to add back in after cleaning tank. also heard put filter an skimmer in tank then another site says that a filter no good that it spikes nitrate levels an to just use a skimmer. so can you help me here. Can someone help me get things straight what do I need for salt water set up? Thanks for any advice you can give because I want to make sure to get off on right foot. Also can you give me some ideas on where to get things online petstores around here sale sick fish all the time an tanks always real dirty an hardly any selection so looking to order everything online since no descent lps around here.

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Old 12-09-2012, 03:03 PM   #2
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Keeping them singularly a tank between 30 and 55g are appropriate, just with smaller tanks you're going to want to be aware that your water changes are frequent, but DO NOT over vacuum your substrate. I'm a sand fanatic, especially if you have an interest in corals, inverts or CUC I would definitely go with aragonite or oolite. Live rocks offer great filtration and usually have some beneficial hitchhikers. Although, whoever told you that you shouldn't use a filter and just use a protein skimmer is nuts. I wouldn't use activated carbon, though, unless you're removing medicine or something like that (can cause substrate hardening and nitrate and phosphate issues) I strongly recommend a biofloss filter, preferably with live nitrifying bacteria, and definitely use ro/di water, or the cheaper alternative, Walmart sells DISTILLED water for 88 cents a gallon, although I have honestly found that buying purified pacific ocean water from the pet store at $11 for 5g in the end is actually cheaper in the end and it cuts water change time in half if not more because there is no need to buy an expensive ro unit or lug a ton of water jugs on top of the hassle of mixing up marine salt, adding water conditioner, aerating, testing, adjusting I used to think it was dumb to buy saltwater for my tanks (considering I've always had freshwater river and pond fish) until my hubby dropped a green spotted puffer on my lap. All you need with the real ocean water is to add trace elements. I run my sw puffer tank 40g, around 30g with rock and sand an aqua clear 70g filter a whisper 40g filter (both HOB) NO protein skimmer, though it's on my wish list, and a water circulator along with 2 air pumps (soon to be 4). Keep good circulation and filtration, keep an eye on your tank/ tanks and monitor water parameters daily- oh yea, and when topping off use distilled or ro/ io conditioned water with NO salt to avoid going over board on salt levels. If I can help in any way pm me- I am on and off again on forums but am notified of private messages readily. Good Luck!!!!

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Old 12-09-2012, 03:08 PM   #3
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First of all welcome to the hobby, I am sure you will find it very rewarding once you get everything running.
Just to point out a few things here, for your live stock
"Ocellaris Clownfish, Pajama Cardinal, Green Chromis. I plan on housing each species in their own tank. with coral an reefs. Eventually would like to breed them some to keep my tanks populated."

I think you are getting ahead of yourself a bit there. Breeding these fish are a lot different than keeping them in your community tank and the setup should be different. If you are thinking about just get into the hobby first, then you should focus on all the detail.

My advice is to get the biggest tank you can afford with a sump. When I say you can afford is not only cost, also space. If you have plenty of space and able to spend some $$.
Then the bigger the better for someone just start. The worst choice would be a nano tank when you don't have much knowledge of salt water/reef keeping.

Easiest coral to keep alive would be soft corals from mushroom to leather coral to toad stood. They are all hardy low light coral they can be keep in your aquarium.

I think you should first set up a list of items.
Frist would be budget, then with the budget, you can think about how big your tank can be and what kind of filtration system you will run on and wat type of lighting you will get.
After that you can think about what type of coral you will want to keep and if the equipment you can get would be able to keep those alive. You also can take this the other way around, read up on all live stock and their basic requirements and work your budget around it.
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Old 12-10-2012, 06:43 PM   #4
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thanks all for the help
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