Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 03-31-2006, 12:25 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: vancouver island
Posts: 526
Nitrate crashes

Ok, I gots me a question.

I was thinking about this last night and couldn't figure out exactly what occurs in this the following situation that can make it so volatile. When a wet/dry is used, we know that over time it can become a nitrate "factory" and eventually cause a crash. My question is, what is the scientific process of this?
__________________

__________________
ryguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 03:12 PM   #2
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
Wet drys are less likely to be nitrate factories as filters like undergravel filters which are the worst and shouldn't even be considered. They are death traps of disease. On all filters, you want to keep them clean...hoses, tubes, mechanics like the propeller and it's housing. A crash is when nitrates are so saturated that the rest of the bio sort of clogs up. The nitrites will start to back up and then ammonia. It's like the opposite of when a tank is establishing bio where it goes from ammonia to nitrite to nitrate with each one zeroing out in the end whereas in a crash...it goes from nitrate to nitrite to ammonia with values high off the chart. It's simply too much saturated waste in the system. When nitrites begin to back up when nitrates are high, then you know there's not enough bio to support the waste load.

This isn't exactly a scientific description, but does explain what happens.
__________________

__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 03:54 PM   #3
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: vancouver island
Posts: 526
Thanks,

I'll give you the situation that worries me and let you tell me if it has potential of causing a crash.

I have my overflow emptying into the first chamber of the sump. I have bioballs in there to diffuse the MAJOR bubbles created in this chamber. The sole reason for the bioballs is diffusion. I also have a small linear piece of filter floss stretching across the inner lip of the first baffle as water flows over it (to help out as well). Then comes my fuge and then a over-under baffle into the last chamber. bewtween the over-under baffle, (about 1 1/2" wide), I have more bioballs, with the purpose of keeping algae out of the main tank, and a layer of filter floss across the balls to minimize remnant microbubbles.

Do I have a potential "si-chi-a-tion" that I need to worry about? The floss gets brown rather quickly, and I replace it every two weeks or so up to this point.....

Just wondering if this type of setup requires that much maintenance, or more?
It does a good job at solving the problem though.
__________________
ryguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 09:36 PM   #4
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
You may want to cover the first chamber of bio balls with a floss to trap waste debris before they have a chance to settle on the bio balls. This would help avoid excess accumilation on the bio balls as well as other areas in the sump. If you feel the need to have to rinse any of the bio media, do so in used tank water so the bio isn't compromised. The first media water going into the filter should be a mechanical media (floss and sponges), then chemical, if any, like carbon, then biological such as bio balls and ceramic rings and the refuge. This order of media will help achieve more effective filtration.

It's best to prevent a crash than to treat one and they key here is to keep nitrates under control. 05 ppm in reef. The best approach in keeping nitrates under control is to avoid over feeding and over crowding. That's where the waste originates from to begin with and an ounce of prevention is certainly worth a pound of cure. Especially in this hobby.

A sump set up is one of the easier and more effective filtration units to run maintain.
__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 11:18 PM   #5
steve-s
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Actually the only fall back of these systems is the lack of proximity to denitrifying bacteria. Wet/dry's and the like are highly aerobic which makes it very difficult for facultative bacteria strains to gain ground. They are still there but in such insufficient quantity they do nothing in terms of nitrate reduction. The key here is to provide areas close to the aerbobic stage of the nitrogen cycle so proximity permits fast use of nitrates converting them instead of entering the water column.

If you can place a sufficient amount of LR/base rock after the intitial aerobic area of the sump, you will greatly reduce the level of nitrate. As always though, export of nutrients (skimmer/water changes/algal harvesting) before they break down is still by far the best process.

Cheers
Steve
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
nitrate

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I Hate Tank Crashes..... Lonewolfblue Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 14 08-12-2009 11:35 PM
What are the signs of Nightly PH crashes? SWerner13 Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 2 04-02-2009 05:10 PM
How much NitrAte is too much? bronxbomber Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 17 02-11-2009 04:59 PM
Nitrate-Nitrogen or Total Nitrate johnkristie Saltwater Reef Aquaria 5 06-11-2008 10:06 PM
nitrate artur Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started 9 03-14-2008 10:44 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.