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Old 11-06-2003, 05:31 PM   #1
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ocean water

Does anyone have an opinion on using ocean water for water changes? I live in Hawaii and was told by a LFS, that using ocean water is better that making salt water using that synthetic stuff. Oh! by the way I have a 55g FO tank.
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Old 11-06-2003, 06:04 PM   #2
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This should answer your question...

Marine aquariums can be filled with either natural seawater or synthetic water mix. Natural seawater must go through a conditioning process before being used in your aquarium. Natural seawater contains numerous microscopic organisms, both plant (phytoplankton) and animal (zooplankton). If the water is not properly conditioned by dark storage for a few weeks, the death of these organisms could radically alter the chemistry of the water, endangering your aquarium specimens.

Secondly, unconditioned water could transmit infectious diseases to your marine fish. Some aquarists prefer to collect their own water, but is is safer and more convenient to use a good quality synthetic sea salt mix.

If you do decide to collect your own seawater, it must be collected away from inshore areas that could be polluted from fertilizer runoff, sewage, heavy metals, insecticides, or other pollutants. Inshore water also contains large quantities of suspended particulates.

Collect seawater only in nontoxic plastic containers with good fitting caps. The water should be stored in closed plastic containers or glass containers for several weeks before use.

After storage, you will note on the container bottoms a fine layer of sediment that should not be added to your aquarium. After addition to the aquarium, the water should be subjected to filtration and aeration for several hours before addition of fish. It is also recommended that several water tests be conducted, including pH, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to insure that they are within safe levels.
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Old 11-06-2003, 06:21 PM   #3
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Quote:
Marine aquariums can be filled with either natural seawater or synthetic water mix. Natural seawater must go through a conditioning process before being used in your aquarium. Natural seawater contains numerous microscopic organisms, both plant (phytoplankton) and animal (zooplankton). If the water is not properly conditioned by dark storage for a few weeks, the death of these organisms could radically alter the chemistry of the water, endangering your aquarium specimens.

Secondly, unconditioned water could transmit infectious diseases to your marine fish. Some aquarists prefer to collect their own water, but is is safer and more convenient to use a good quality synthetic sea salt mix.

If you do decide to collect your own seawater, it must be collected away from inshore areas that could be polluted from fertilizer runoff, sewage, heavy metals, insecticides, or other pollutants. Inshore water also contains large quantities of suspended particulates.

Collect seawater only in nontoxic plastic containers with good fitting caps. The water should be stored in closed plastic containers or glass containers for several weeks before use.

After storage, you will note on the container bottoms a fine layer of sediment that should not be added to your aquarium. After addition to the aquarium, the water should be subjected to filtration and aeration for several hours before addition of fish. It is also recommended that several water tests be conducted, including pH, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to insure that they are within safe levels.
I don't know for sure, but, the above statement seems to me, to be copied and pasted into the post. If this is the case, please supply the place that it came from or book it was copied from so that we can all benefit from the full version or rest of the story so to speak.....
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Old 11-06-2003, 06:25 PM   #4
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Sorry, it was taken from a book entitled, "The New Saltwater Aquarium Handbook", by George C Blasiola II. That was basically all they said about the topic and I had remembered reading it, so I thought I would share.

Best,
RodneyCK
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Old 11-06-2003, 06:39 PM   #5
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Thanks... I was looking out for the author..
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