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Old 07-23-2010, 09:04 PM   #41
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Do you have any sort of evidence to support this, besides the fact that your tank is still running?

And your comparison to the ocean makes absolutely no sense. If you have a huge body of water like the ocean, think how much energy it takes or has to lose in order to change temp, even in a small area. Then compare that to a 5 gallon? Here, my cycling tank was swinging from 74ish to 85-90 in the night/day. Can you honestly say that wouldn't have any effect on your inhabitants?
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Old 07-24-2010, 02:23 AM   #42
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Kurt, ask yourself what the make up of nitrite is? Then think about water evaporation. Where do you think no3 will go when attached to water vapor?

Also, water in the ocean changes temps (at reef levels) when the sun goes down, why would a gradual change in temps of say from 78f to 74f ever be of concern with a healthly tank any way?

Never bothered any of my guys and they now reside in my 155gal.
I'm no chemistry major, but last time I read up on that stuff, neither nitrites (no2) or nitrates (no3) evaporated out of the tank. If it did, seems like folks with large evaporation rates from all their high wattage lighting setups wouldn't need all these fancy ways of lowering their nitrates!

Agree that localized temps on reef can vary quite a bit during a day, and a variance between 78 and 74 shouldn't hurt anything. But I'd hate to see someone who has a house that gets down to 60 at night not put a heater in and scratch their head why things aren't doing well when their water is swinging between 60 and 80. All depends on where ya live, I suppose.
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Old 07-24-2010, 11:07 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpha_03 View Post
Kurt, ask yourself what the make up of nitrite is? Then think about water evaporation. Where do you think no3 will go when attached to water vapor?

Also, water in the ocean changes temps (at reef levels) when the sun goes down, why would a gradual change in temps of say from 78f to 74f ever be of concern with a healthly tank any way?

Never bothered any of my guys and they now reside in my 155gal.
I'm not Kurt, but that statement caught my eye.
A nitrite ion is comprised of a central nitrogen atom and two oxygen atoms, one of which carries a negative charge. A water molecule (H2O) is a central hydrogen atom and 2 oxygen atoms. Perhaps you can explain how they "attach" because I never heard of such a thing.
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Old 07-26-2010, 12:17 AM   #44
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The amount of mis-information in this thread is startling.

Nitrites and then nitrates are in no way self exporting through out gasing or other methods. Unless there is a means to reduce them, they will continue to build as part of the nitrogen cycle.

Some people mitigate this by installing plants or other life which feeds off nitrate but in a tank as discribed which has no other export method physical removal is essential to maintain healthy levels for the inhabitants.
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Old 07-26-2010, 12:37 AM   #45
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I think alpha is implying that the nitrates/nitrites will get converted by the anaerobic bacteria back into atmospheric nitrogen (N2), which is why there are dsb's. This is one path the nitrogen can take in the ocean. The other path is to be used in photosynthesis by phytoplankton and plants (kind of the same thing :P)
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Old 07-26-2010, 01:38 PM   #46
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BTW, this as per wikopedia:

Denitrification is a microbially facilitated process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction that may ultimately produce molecular nitrogen (N2) through a series of intermediate gaseous nitrogen oxide products. This respiratory process reduces oxidized forms of nitrogen in response to the oxidation of an electron donor such as organic matter. The preferred nitrogen electron acceptors in order of most to least thermodynamically favorable include: nitrate (NO3−), nitrite (NO2−), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide (N2O). In terms of the general nitrogen cycle, denitrification completes the cycle by returning N2 to the atmosphere.
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Old 07-26-2010, 01:55 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpha_03 View Post
BTW, this as per wikopedia:

Denitrification is a microbially facilitated process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction that may ultimately produce molecular nitrogen (N2) through a series of intermediate gaseous nitrogen oxide products. This respiratory process reduces oxidized forms of nitrogen in response to the oxidation of an electron donor such as organic matter. The preferred nitrogen electron acceptors in order of most to least thermodynamically favorable include: nitrate (NO3−), nitrite (NO2−), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide (N2O). In terms of the general nitrogen cycle, denitrification completes the cycle by returning N2 to the atmosphere.

WIKIPEDIA. ANYONE can edit ANYTHING on that. So you could have just posted that yourself and then quoted it.
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Old 07-26-2010, 02:15 PM   #48
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No it was there before, and you can also check when and from where it is edited
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Old 07-26-2010, 02:18 PM   #49
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No it was there before, and you can also check when and from where it is edited
thanks. lol. traitor! :p
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Old 07-26-2010, 02:21 PM   #50
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It's not like we're on some mission anyways... this thread kind of got off topic...
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