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Old 07-26-2010, 02:28 PM   #51
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Even the Wikipedia article does not imply that evaporation will help with nitrate reduction.
Quote:
Denitrification is a microbially facilitated process
is quite true. The bacteria that turn NO3 back to N2 live in the anoxic zones (DSB, LR, detrinifying chambers). So NO3 export is achieved by bacteria converting NO3 to N2, PWC's, or macro algae using the nitrate.
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:03 PM   #52
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BTW, this as per wikopedia:

Denitrification is a microbially facilitated process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction that may ultimately produce molecular nitrogen (N2) through a series of intermediate gaseous nitrogen oxide products. This respiratory process reduces oxidized forms of nitrogen in response to the oxidation of an electron donor such as organic matter. The preferred nitrogen electron acceptors in order of most to least thermodynamically favorable include: nitrate (NO3−), nitrite (NO2−), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide (N2O). In terms of the general nitrogen cycle, denitrification completes the cycle by returning N2 to the atmosphere.
Nothing there I disagree with. A "microbially facilitated process" is not evaporation. Nitrites don't evaporate away... neither do nitrates. Nitrites will be converted by aerobic bacteria to nitrates. And if you have a place for anaerobic bacteria to set up shop, then the nitrates will be converted to nitrogen gas and bubble out of your tank.

The original comment that sparked all this was the implication that the nitrites in a non-cycled, or partially cycled tank weren't an issue because they just evaporated away in time. Agree with some of the others... this thread has gone way off topic. But there are some statements here that I'd hate to see someone down the road stumble across, and follow them blindly.
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:08 PM   #53
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen_Cycle.svg
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:09 PM   #54
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Just curious, so with a DSB one might not have to do as much pwcs as one without one? Also, I'm guessing DSBs should be in a sump most of the time to prevent those bubbles from affecting the fish? Sorry to thread jack just trying to learn.
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:13 PM   #55
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Yeah... that picture pretty much says what several of us are saying. Different kinds of bacteria convert ammonia to nitrites, then nitrites to nitrates, and then nitrates to nitrogen gas. The nitrogen gas out-gasses to atmosphere.

Not really seeing how any of this supports the "nitrites will evaporate out of your aquarium water" statement. Yes... the end product of the nitrogen cycle will out-gas from your tank (not evaporate), but that assumes you have the complete nitrogen cycle in your tank. All tanks do not have that last anaerobic step and can't convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. So the cycle stops there.
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:17 PM   #56
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As I originally stated Nitrites are evaporated back into the atmosphere, there is no agurement, I hope, over this fact. But I think it is safe to assume that the bio cycling has been achived, in this case.
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:17 PM   #57
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Just curious, so with a DSB one might not have to do as much pwcs as one without one? Also, I'm guessing DSBs should be in a sump most of the time to prevent those bubbles from affecting the fish? Sorry to thread jack just trying to learn.
No... a DSB can be in the display tank just fine. Fish don't care about a little bubble now and then. And no... having a DSB doesn't mean you should back off on pwcs - you still need to replenish what your corals are taking out of the water. Nitrate reduction isn't the only reason you do water changes.
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:19 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by Kurt_Nelson View Post
No... a DSB can be in the display tank just fine. Fish don't care about a little bubble now and then. And no... having a DSB doesn't mean you should back off on pwcs - you still need to replenish what your corals are taking out of the water. Nitrate reduction isn't the only reason you do water changes.
Ok, just curious. Thanks for clearing that up
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:19 PM   #59
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As I originally stated Nitrites are evaporated back into the atmosphere, there is no agurement, I hope, over this fact.
There is. Show me in your Wikipedia quote, or in the Wikipedia graphic you posted where it shows nitrites evaporating into the atmosphere. Both articles show nitrogen gas going back into the atmosphere, which is a far cry from nitrites.
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:26 PM   #60
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From the above picture, we already know that a cycled aquarium in converting solids to gas is what the cycle does, other wise there is no complete cycle at all. Evaporation helps to carry these gases away (not just n2) ask yourself why your aquarium water has a certain odor to it.

Pure water has no odor.
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