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Old 06-18-2012, 11:57 PM   #1
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I've been hearing alot of differing views on what the should be,( even though they're just a couple tenths of salinity or ph off. So, what is the ideal ph, temperature, and salinity of a fish and reef tank
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Old 06-19-2012, 12:05 AM   #2
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Besides salinity at 1.026 or 1.025 I don't really believe there is an ideal pH or temperature.

A stable pH is much better than a higher pH that swings all over the place.

Temp is also a preference. Many folks keep the temp between 76-80 degrees. Besides breeding fish at a higher temp, I haven't come across much reputable literature to make a case for a specific temp.
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Old 06-19-2012, 12:09 AM   #3
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Thank you for the info!
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Old 06-19-2012, 08:04 AM   #4
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This may help....
Reef Aquarium Water Parameters by Randy Holmes-Farley - Reefkeeping.com

"For reference, natural ocean water has a salinity of about 35 ppt, corresponding to a specific gravity of about 1.0264 and a conductivity of 53 mS/cm.
As far as I know, there is little real evidence that keeping a coral reef aquarium at anything other than natural levels is preferable."

"All things considered, I recommend temperatures in the range of 76-83 F unless there is a very clear reason to keep it outside that range."

"the pH range from 7.8 to 8.5 is an acceptable range for reef aquaria"
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Old 06-19-2012, 09:24 AM   #5
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Salinity recommendations generally change when your talking about a fish only or a a reef tank. Fish only systems benefit from lower salinity. Low salinity can ward off parasites, cheaper due to less salt and reduced levels of elements only really need in reefs.

Ph is generally recommended to stay in the 8.2 range. Stability is most important however consistently low ph and consistently high ph can cause problems. Many people raise ph to fight certain problems such as hair algae, dinoflagellets etc. Depressed ph below 8.1 for long periods will slow coral growth and if low enough will stunt growth and bleach corals.

Temp can cause all kinds of things to happen from spawning behavior to bacteria reproduction. Higher temp generally speed up cycles in the tank from bacteria to ick.

Above all its important to keep these parameters as stable and unchanging as possible. Changes kill
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Old 06-19-2012, 11:08 AM   #6
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Wow, thanks for all this great info guys! Glad I came to these forums.
Oh, and a question for you schism. You said that a ph of 8.1 or lower will slow down growth? But capt said 7.8-8.5 was acceptable. Not questioning, just asking
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Old 06-19-2012, 03:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schism View Post
Salinity recommendations generally change when your talking about a fish only or a a reef tank. Fish only systems benefit from lower salinity. Low salinity can ward off parasites, cheaper due to less salt and reduced levels of elements only really need in reefs.
I disagree. Regardless of what type of tank you have, 1.025/26 is still the natural salinity of sea water. Reef elements aren't helping or hurting fish in either case. If you're using a non-reef marine salt the reef elements are a non-issue and you'd already be saving money. Salinity would have to dip dangerously low to provide resistance against parasites. Though this can help to get rid of Ick, it's not a level at which I would want to keep my fish.
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Old 06-19-2012, 06:01 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by AquaRick

I disagree. Regardless of what type of tank you have, 1.025/26 is still the natural salinity of sea water. Reef elements aren't helping or hurting fish in either case. If you're using a non-reef marine salt the reef elements are a non-issue and you'd already be saving money. Salinity would have to dip dangerously low to provide resistance against parasites. Though this can help to get rid of Ick, it's not a level at which I would want to keep my fish.
I agree with natural levels as well, just trying to explain to the OP why people advocate different levels for different reasons, you can never go wrong with natural levels.
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Old 06-19-2012, 06:05 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Antec
Wow, thanks for all this great info guys! Glad I came to these forums.
Oh, and a question for you schism. You said that a ph of 8.1 or lower will slow down growth? But capt said 7.8-8.5 was acceptable. Not questioning, just asking
Yes it is acceptable. But generally you do not want it to stay there for long periods. Many studies have been done on ocean acidification and coral growth. I believe the last one i read stated anything below 8.1 for long periods and growth gradually begins to decline. Below 7.8 growth is stunted and corals bleach out. Also be sure you checking your ph at the same time of day, preferably when right before lights out.
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Old 06-20-2012, 02:24 AM   #10
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I agree with natural levels as well, just trying to explain to the OP why people advocate different levels for different reasons, you can never go wrong with natural levels.
Ahh I see, sorry for the misunderstanding.
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