Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 05-07-2003, 10:54 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: ND
Posts: 20
Red Coris Wrasse

are red coris wrasses mean and hard to take care of?

thanks
__________________

__________________
ti6al4v_15 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2003, 11:14 PM   #2
AA Team Emeritus
 
reefrunner69's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Cedar Key, FL
Posts: 1,663
IME, Coris wrasses are hard to care for, I have not seen too many people that could keep one for any longevity (personal observance only, I've never owned one). "Mean" is kind of a relative term, in what context do you mean? Are they aggressive to other fish? Are the aggressive to inverts, etc...
__________________

__________________
Kevin

Visit Nature Coast Photography
reefrunner69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2003, 01:22 AM   #3
Aquarium Advice Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: NY
Posts: 8
The Red Coris (also called the Yellowtail Coris) will eat snails, mollusks, hermit crabs, other crabs, shrimp and sea urchins.

These fish can get to be quite large over time so eventually they need alot of space. They require a layer on sand so that they can bury themselves at night.

By the way, they change their color completely from juvenille to adult. They start off red with some white accents and change to a spotted blue with yellow tail.
__________________
RCSALTY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2003, 01:45 AM   #4
Aquarium Advice Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Palatine Illinois
Posts: 4
I have had a Coris in my reef tak now for about 4 years with no problems. I realize that they are not consider good fish for reefs but I got mine as a baby and altho it is changing to adult colors now it seems to be kept in check by the resident tank boss (a Maroon Clown- also about the same age). I do have a Urchin and a couple of shrimp in the tank (also for a few years now) and recently one of the shrimps disappeared, but I have never noticed the Coris do much except steal food from the shrimps when it can. As adults they are quite colorful and always on the move when the lights are on.
__________________
pufferlover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2003, 01:15 AM   #5
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
rthoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: York, PA
Posts: 173
Send a message via AIM to rthoman Send a message via MSN to rthoman Send a message via Yahoo to rthoman
So it takes 4 years for it to change color? They have a juvy and an adult at the one LFS. Id love to see that transition.
__________________
Ryan
rthoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2003, 10:57 AM   #6
AA Team Emeritus
 
reefrunner69's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Cedar Key, FL
Posts: 1,663
I do not beleive it takes 4years for them to change. I think there is probably some environmental factor or social factor that triggers the change after the fish has reached a certain size. So it is probably different for each fish and each tank.
__________________
Kevin

Visit Nature Coast Photography
reefrunner69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2003, 10:53 PM   #7
Aquarium Advice Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Palatine Illinois
Posts: 4
I agree that time for color changes can be quite different based on tank factors and feeding methods. I have one Twin Spot Wrasse that is now over 6 years old (quite large now) but still in a middle color change time. I bought that one as a small baby with the great colors those fish have as babies. Mid color sort of white washed out with some green, adult color supposed to be a almost solid green. Some fish such as Black Spotted Puffs can be bought in various colors (based on age and size) but in most cases once caught and in a tank they grow but the color changing stops where it is. One of my best buys (in my mind) was a Striped in a grey, yellow belly with balck spots and a gold back. This fish I am praying does not change a thing it is the most perfect Dogface I have ever bought with beautiful natural coloration.
__________________
pufferlover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2003, 11:50 PM   #8
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Lakewood, NJ
Posts: 471
Hi this is a section from Live Aquaria on the Red Coris wrasse, I have a Gold Coris Wrasse for about 3 years in my 30 gal. reef very shy and dosen't bother anyone. The Red Coris seems to be different as far as its aggresion goes according to this site. Hope this helps.

The Red Coris Wrasse, also known as the Clown Wrasse, Red Labrid, or Yellowtail Coris, can be found on almost every reef in the Indo-Pacific and Hawaiian Region, and extends all the way into the Red Sea. Adult specimens in the wild can easily grow to a foot, but in an aquarium, they rarely exceed 6-8 inches. The juvenile and adult appearances vary greatly. As a youth, the body color is orange with white tiger stripes or spots across the back. The stripes and fins are outlined in black. In adulthood, the body takes on a speckled blue coloration, the fins are decorated with yellows, reds, and blues, and the face is orange with green stripes. The male has a light green stripe on the body, just above the anal fin.

The Red Coris Wrasse requires a 100 gallon or larger aquarium with a sandy bottom into which it will burrow to sleep, or if it is threatened. Do not attempt to keep the Red Coris Wrasse on crushed coral or similar substrate as they have a poor survival rate on such substrates. When very small, Red Coris are safe with almost any fish that will not eat them, but as they grow, they can become destructive. They should not be kept with invertebrates.

The Red Coris Wrasse feeds mostly on shelled mollusks in the wild including hermit crabs, urchins, crabs, and occasionally tunicates. Aquarium specimens should have meaty items, vitamin-enriched shrimp, and brine shrimp three times daily.

Approximate Purchase Size: Juvenile Small: 1" to 1-3/4"; Juvenile Medium: 1-3/4" to 2-1/4"; Juvenile Large: 2-1/4" to 3-1/2"; Small: 1-1/2" to 3"; Medium: 3" to 4"; Large: 4" to 6"

Please note: We guarantee that ALL aquaria species we offer will arrive alive and in good condition. However, because of the increased level of care required for this particular species, it has been designated as "Expert Only," (R) and we cannot guarantee it after arrival. As an Expert Only species, we recommend that only the expert marine aquarist, zoo, or research institution should purchase this species.
__________________

__________________
John

75 gal. Reef & 30 gal. Anemone Tanks.

I get paid for what I may have to do, Not for what I do!
EMS503 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
wrasse

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Green Coris Wrasse blues Donnie2112 Saltwater Reef Aquaria 2 08-29-2009 06:56 PM
Coris Wrasse? SeeDemTails Saltwater Fish Only & FOWLR 4 06-08-2006 10:56 PM
Red Head Solon Fairy Wrasse thoughts? Melissamustang Saltwater Reef Aquaria 2 04-10-2006 08:53 PM
Red Coris Wrasse saltwatersmac Saltwater Reef Aquaria 4 03-15-2005 06:02 PM
Red Coris EBR Saltwater & Reef - Identification 6 12-08-2004 04:09 AM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.