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Old 08-25-2004, 03:04 PM   #11
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1.025.. it's a reef tank though so it doesn't do too well if it gets much lower than that.
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:06 PM   #12
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well i would go with 1.023 1.021 is a little low.
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A 46 gal bow front (Soft coral) reef tank with a 10 gal sump. And a 30 gal (SPS and Clam) reef tank hooked up to the sump of the 46 so they share water.
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:07 PM   #13
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I'm not sure what I should do, mine has been at 021 for almost a year and my fish have trippled there size
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:09 PM   #14
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Do it slow I would think right, like maybe bring it up to 022 this week then 023 by next week
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:23 PM   #15
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yes if you are going to bring it up do it slowly. but it is relly up to you what you keep it at. if you have had it at that sg for some time and every thing has been doing good then keep it at that. but my reef is at 35ppm (about 1.026 sg) but that is a reef.
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:23 PM   #16
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I think 0.001 every couple days is fine.
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:31 PM   #17
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Check out this artical that talks about salinity
Salinity is a measure of how much salt is in the water. The standard measure is in parts per thousand (ppt). Seawater usually has about 28 to 35 parts of salt per 1000 parts of water. As the salt content of water increases, the weight and density of the water also increase. Increased density makes an object float higher. Thus, changes in density can be easily measured as specific gravity with a hydrometer, which floats in the water. The specific gravity of pure water is 1.0000.

Most marine aquarists refer to the salinity of their water in terms of specific gravity, the direct reading on a hydrometer. The true specific gravity of seawater in the 28 to 35 ppt range is 1.0206 to 1.0260, and most marine aquarium systems fall into this range.

It is good to keep the salinity of a marine aquarium a bit lower than ''normal'' seawater. If an old-hand marine aquarist says that he keeps his systems at a salinity of 22, this is short speak for a specific gravity of 1.0220, not 22 ppt — 1.0220 is actually a salinity of 34 ppt at 80 degrees Fahrenheit when measured with a conventionally calibrated hydrometer. A little lower salinity — 1.0210 (at 80 degrees Fahrenheit) or a salinity of 32 ppt — reduces stress on the fish and keeps the tank in the proper range even when salinity increases a bit due to water evaporation. Never add saltwater to a marine aquarium to make up for water lost to evaporation. Only pure water leaves the system; the salt stays behind.
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:37 PM   #18
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I'd like to see evidence to support the theory that it reduces stress.
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:40 PM   #19
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Me to ,I wonder why every fish store or article you read says something different ,was thinking maybe on the web there would be a cut and dry answer but it does not seem that way, this is the first article I read that states what your salinity should be the others kind of leave an open door like they don't have an answer
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Old 08-25-2004, 03:51 PM   #20
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check out this article, as I said they all say something different
When testing your water there are several things that you need to know about your water in order to maintain a healthy tank. First your salinity levels should be about 1.021 and 1.023 is what most people recommend. You don't want to much salt because it can speed up the breathing process which is very deadly to your fish, and you will have to clean up more salt build-up in your filters. Too little salt also can kill your fish. Also you want to keep a pH of about 8.2-8.3 is what most recommend, and is a safe level to keep it at. Ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates are another good thing to be keeping track of. After your cycle you would want to have your ammonia levels down as much as possible to keep your fish healthy. The levels should be 0 but if you have a little more than that it doesn't matter much because there will always be ammonia present. Your nitrite and nitrate levels also should be down to about 0 and if its at about .25 its still okay, but anything above that can be harmful. The next thing you will want to know is what temperature to be keeping your water at. It is said that most people prefer about 77 degrees F. If you have your temperatures fluctuate to much it can cause stress to your fish and they can get diseases, so make sure your heater or chiller is very stable. If you live in a hot area your water may be too hot requiring that you have a chiller.
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