Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 06-17-2003, 02:41 PM   #11
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Beacon, New York
Posts: 1,386
So maybe its time for Uncle Fester to go?
__________________

__________________
Bill The Cat For President!
stresco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 02:53 PM   #12
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 7,224
Send a message via Yahoo to Hara
only if you want a healthy and active sandbed....sorry
__________________

__________________
Hara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 02:54 PM   #13
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Central PA
Posts: 971
I wouldn't be overly concerned. If I read correctly, the tank is only 3 months old. Most tanks go through a number of algae blooms until the tank matures...usually somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 months. I would just have patience and maybe add a few more herbivorous snails, 2 turbos and 15 Caribbean snails does not sound like many for a 125g. I have never had much algae control from hermits.
HoopsGuru is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 06:20 PM   #14
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Washington
Posts: 155
Well according to the so called experts Cyano is a sign of a healthy sandbed .
Cyano is an algae and bacteria living together. Once the enviroment is skewed in thier direction it will never go away. It comsumes nutrient 500 times faster then the next best Algae. In order to skew things in thier way the following must occur. Could be one or all of them combind.
1> Lighting. As lights get old the begin to shift to the red spectrum. The red spectrum is the ultimate source of food for the algae form of Cyano.
2>Water flow. The algae portion of Cyano has no hold fasts, thus it blankets its territory, thus in order for it to grow and flourish it needs an area where to much water flow wont screw up its growth.
3>Nutrients. Most of all phosphates but it will utilise almost any kind of nutrient, and do it well. Over feeding, poor water quality(as in not ro/di), high bio load (as in lots of fish and lots of fish Poo). Also a poorly running DSB( not enough bugs, or really not enough of the right kind of worm).

check these, fix them and you wont have a problem.

On the DSB one thing to realise is that it wont work if it doesnt have the right kind of worm in it. Most folks think that bristle worms, or pods, or stuff like that will make a DSB work. This is NOT true. A dsb works by transfer of nitrates from the oxygenated zone down to the anoxic zone. All Bugs will not go past the oxygenated zone, with the exception of ONE type of Polychate. If you dont got it the bed dont work, simple as that.


hope it helps


Mike
__________________
Make sure you check out

www.reeffrontiers.com
mojoreef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 06:28 PM   #15
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 7,224
Send a message via Yahoo to Hara
Quote:
On the DSB one thing to realise is that it wont work if it doesnt have the right kind of worm in it
Which worms would those be?
__________________
Hara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 06:39 PM   #16
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Washington
Posts: 155
LOL I knew that was coming, I am trying to search for the correct name. It is basically a thin earth worm looking polychate. It has the ability to hold its breathe while diving into the anoxic zones, no other critter has that ability (not including bacteria of coarse). YOu can tell if you have this worm by seeing tracks going from the upper zones to the lower ones.

I will do a couple searches and see if I can come up with the scientific name for you.


Mike
__________________
Make sure you check out

www.reeffrontiers.com
mojoreef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 06:42 PM   #17
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 7,224
Send a message via Yahoo to Hara
I have just recently seen, on my glass and sand, a very thin, really really thin, did I mention thin? white worm...would this be it?
__________________
Hara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 06:53 PM   #18
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,151
I have a bunch of thin worms on my glass, but they are all coiled up, what are they
__________________
If you don't love what you do, you'd better find something else to love. Otherwise, you don't have a reason for living.
-Ray B.
d9hp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 07:25 PM   #19
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Washington
Posts: 155
Ok hare the scientific name is capitella capitata and they look like this


usually they are kinda flesh tone earth worm color and yes they are thin. Most of the time you will see thier trails through the sand, this is the indicator that you have them and things are working. The really thin thin thin worms are spaggetti worms (look kinda like threads)

d9hp I am not sure check them to see if they are hard or soft.


Mike
__________________
mojoreef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2003, 01:08 AM   #20
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Central PA
Posts: 971
Just curious for the scientific study stating the results that a certain worm is needed or a deep sand bed is doomed to failure? If this was true, I would expect to hear a wide range of complaints about this system....as this is the first time I have heard of the mystery worm in question. I have also yet to see the worm be a required part of any detrivore kit.

The fact that "all bugs will not go past the oxygenated zone" is flat out untrue. There are tons of protozoans, bacteria, flatworms, etc that travel through the sandbed even into the upper levels of the anaerobic areas. Diversity is the key over any particular "worm" or any other creature. Most of the worms that help provide water to the lower levels of the substrate are easily established with live rock.

The latest issue of Reefkeeping Online should shed more light on this:
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-0...ture/index.htm
__________________

__________________
HoopsGuru is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
sand

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My tank is a mess Cherie Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 13 07-17-2007 11:51 AM
What a mess!!! fish_4_all Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 5 05-14-2005 07:16 PM
What a mess? Hookman Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started 3 10-27-2003 05:40 PM
My tank is a mess!!! i need help helpmyfish Cichlid Discussion 5 08-04-2003 11:51 AM
What did I mess up? VN Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 14 10-19-2002 03:37 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.