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Old 08-14-2003, 07:00 PM   #1
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Sea Anemones

Ever since I was a kid, I've always thought that the sea anemone was one of the most beautiful animals. I've been running freshwater aquariums for a while, and I'm about to have a 10 gallone completely freed up.

I have a decent amount of experience with freshwater fish/invert care, but I know two things and two things only about saltwater aquariums: they're rumored to be more difficult than freshwater and they're rumored to be more expensive than freshwater to start.

So, my question is this: is it possible for a sea anemone (or 2?) to live in a 10 gallon tank? If so, could anyone recommend a good site as an introduction to saltwater aquariums? Also, would there need to be any fish in the tank for anemone survival?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
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Old 08-14-2003, 10:02 PM   #2
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is it possible for a sea anemone (or 2?) to live in a 10 gallon tank?
For a SW begginer? I wouldn't suggest it.. I also would not suggest a tank any smaller than a 20 gal long IMO. But to answer your question, yes it is possible for a or 2 anemones to live in a 10 gal tank...

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If so, could anyone recommend a good site as an introduction to saltwater aquariums?
None better than the one you just posted these questions on...


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Also, would there need to be any fish in the tank for anemone survival?
Anemones do not need a Clown fish to survive... And the same goes reversed. I think it looks nice for a Clown to host an anemone, but it is not needed...
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Old 08-14-2003, 11:22 PM   #3
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Hey WackyInsertions try this http://liveaquaria.com/
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Old 08-14-2003, 11:59 PM   #4
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I would advise against an anemone. They are not really aquarium suitable animals in that you severely limit their life span in such a small enclosed space. In the wild they live to be hundreds of years old. In aquariums they may make it a year or so if well kept for most people.

A pretty good site to read articles on smaller sw aquariums is www.nano-reef.com

But generally anemones do best in well established aquariums. 6 months to a year old. And small sw aquariums are also very prone to swings and are generally harder to maintain then bigger aquariums.
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Old 08-15-2003, 12:50 AM   #5
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You will read a lot of differing opinions on anemones. In general, if you can buy a tank raised one they are hardier! They also need pretty intense lighting, so expense will be an issue there.
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Old 08-15-2003, 03:55 AM   #6
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well.. since you have a small 10 gallon.. it is not hard to accomodate the lighting need per gallon.. you've only got ten hehe.. anemones' survival rate in marine aquarium is really low.. even experts find it hard to care for.. i got mines as a rescue mission.. i knew the fish store that sold it and i knew that they're no good when it comes to saltwater fish.. so i bought it..
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Old 08-15-2003, 05:01 AM   #7
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Jeese, I had no idea that aquariums were impending doom for anemones. I guess I'll just have to put saltwater aside for now and maybe set up a spawning tank.

Does anyone happen to know why they don't do well in aquariums? I mean, suppose you gave it an ideal setup (whatever that may be), would it still die in a few years?

Also, thanks for all of the information, disheartening as it may be
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Old 08-15-2003, 08:44 PM   #8
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well.. on wetwebmedia.com.. it says that many died due to starvation.. with the aquarist thinking that they don't need to be fed and all..
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Old 08-15-2003, 09:22 PM   #9
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Don't be too easily "disheartened" I know many people who have succesfully kept anemones for years in there tanks.

Granted they are much larger than 10gal!
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Old 08-16-2003, 02:03 AM   #10
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well.. on wetwebmedia.com.. it says that many died due to starvation.. with the aquarist thinking that they don't need to be fed and all..
Very true!! In most all cases though aquariust go to either one extreme or the other. They key is finding balance between the lighting needs and the supplimental "solid" foods. Anemones by far receive more than 80% of their needs from the production of zooxanthellae aglaes in it's tissues in which they convert to sugars to feed on.

In a tank with fish or where food is placed in the tank "free floating" an a regular basis, the anemone will by default be fed by this method as well, but does depend on the amounts used and frequency. In a fishless tank, this will not be sufficient and the anemone does need to be fed directly. Large regular feedings however are not necessary or recommended (by me anyway). It would benefit the anemone more if the foods fed where very small and the feedings sporadic. Overfeeding can be just as damaging as not feeding.

When the anemones expell wastes it is not a simple matter. If too often, the expelling of wastes can create much stress in the animal causing unseen damage that may cause it do diminish over time. The anemone also uses a fair amount of it's stored energy to expell these wastes furthing possible stress that could also weeken it.

Although misunderstood and with so many conficting care regimens, it should still be considered one of the hardest to keep and the last to aquire (if at all)

Just my thoughts...

Cheers
Steve
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