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Old 12-31-2012, 01:27 AM   #1
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Sump

I everyone was wondering what size sump for a 150 gallon tank, and someone told me go bigger on tank if you like tangs. I'm not planning to do all tanga just two or three and other tip fishes. So 150 sox feet long is ok and sump thanks
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Old 12-31-2012, 01:33 AM   #2
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The largest sump you can get to fit under the stand! I'd imagine you'll have a large protein skimmer so you'll need room for that, a return pump, and a refugium or LR if you're doing that. Three tangs is pushing it for a 150. Make sure when you do get tangs that they are different body shapes so that there is no (or less) aggression. If you can fit a 55, 75, 90 under then get that. Yes larger is better and adds to the total water volume.
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Old 12-31-2012, 01:36 AM   #3
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The largest sump you can fit under your stand or in the place you are considering for it is the best advice. The larger the sump, the more total water volume, more space for your protein skimmer and reactors or refugium or whatever you want in it. As far as the tank size, Some of that also depends on which tangs you are considering.
If this is to be a reef tank, I would suggest a 125 or 180 over a 150. the reason is, a 125 is not as tall, thus easier to reach the bottom. The 180 is 24" front to back, which is much better than the narrow 18" f2b the 150 offers, plus, it's also 4" shallower, which, like the 125, will be easier to reach the bottom.
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Old 12-31-2012, 01:48 AM   #4
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Thanks guys bigger the sump the more water volume. And I'll rething tank size was planning on 150 but want shallow long and wide tank how is a 200 gallon, cause don't want to stress fish have aggression with one another. Peaceful tank colorful as well, like angel fish and butterfly fish two. Lol i hope my planning that is slow ant stupid it's hard to decide. I'm like to start fowlr then mixed reef. Thank you for advice suggestion any comments please do.
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Old 12-31-2012, 03:15 AM   #5
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Well dwarf angelfish are semi-aggressive and it's a gamble whether or not they'll eat corals. Butterfly fish are hard to keep and they might nip at corals so I've heard. A FOWLR would be better for these guys. Don't know much about the butterfly fish though. 200 would be definitely more awesome!
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Old 12-31-2012, 04:17 AM   #6
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I've got a 110 XH gal tank. 31" deep and getting to the bottom is easy. Mask, snorkel and a step ladder is all you need. Maybe someone nearby incase you fall in head first. No problem.
Ok, perhaps they have a point. When I had to bury my feather duster it was a problem. A soup spoon and I shut the return pump off to lower the tank level and I eventually got him placed. But in my opinion it's worth it. I love the picture frame look of the large frontage tanks as compared to the squater tanks. But it all personal preference.
On a serious note tho if you do go deep, make sure you don't have ANY deodorant on when your working on an inhabited tank. Deodorants are copper based to kill the odor producing bacteria which is also deadly to tank inhabitants. That's an issue most short tank owners don't have to consider.
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Old 12-31-2012, 09:40 AM   #7
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Just another thing about tank depth- The shallower the tank, the easier it is to get light to reach the bottom.
You could also go custom-
Glasscages.com - Glass Aquariums
I chose a "300 wide" (which in my opinion, is still a little hard to reach the bottom)
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Old 12-31-2012, 02:35 PM   #8
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There are 2 sides to every coin. Shallower tanks have less light attenuation at the bottom , but deeper tanks have more. That means more different light levels between top and bottom. But you will need a more intense light source to support all those levels.
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