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Old 01-30-2013, 07:30 PM   #61
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Nice! Very cool.
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Old 01-30-2013, 07:38 PM   #62
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Nice! Very cool.
Thank you its a work in progress
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:19 PM   #63
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Latest Stocking Research List - Corals added and everything split into groups.

---------------------------------
inverts

(maybe wait on these because of the nitrate, parameters and iodine issues)
Saltwater Aquarium Shrimps for Marine Reef Aquariums: Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp
Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Red, White
Diet: Carnivore
Supplements: Calcium, Magnesium, Iodine, Trace Elements
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Indonesia, Sri Lanka
Family: Hippolytidae
Like other invertebrates, the Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp is intolerant of copper-based medications, high nitrate levels, and fluctuating water parameters. It also requires the drip-acclimation process when first introduced to your system. Also, proper iodine supplementation is necessary to promote molting and growth. To supplement their diet, feed Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp freeze dried, frozen, and flake foods.

(love this but feeding requirements look daunting)
Saltwater Aquarium Inverts for Marine Reef Aquariums: Dwarf Colored Feather Duster
Dwarf Colored Feather Duster (Bispira sp.)
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Waterflow: Medium
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Max. Size: 4"
Color Form: Red, White, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Supplements: Calcium, Trace Elements
Origin: Indo-Pacific
Family: Sabellidae
The Dwarf Colored Feather Duster is exquisite in both form and shape. Its fan-shaped radiole is a gorgeous pink, white, or yellow color that dresses any aquarium. Because it will grow only up to 4", this species of Bispira is suited for any sized aquarium. The Dwarf Colored Feather Duster is usually found in the coral rubble at the base of the reef, with some of the rubble being incorporated into its parchment-like tubes. It requires a well-established reef system since it is dependent upon floating plankton for its diet.

---------------------------------
fish

(hmm if I'm reading this right it will eat stuff from the rocks, not sure that would be a good thing)
Saltwater Aquarium Fish for Marine Aquariums: Red Striped Goby
Red Striped Goby (Trimma cana)
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025
Max. Size: 1"
Color Form: Red, White
Diet: Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Cebu
Family: Gobiidae
It should be kept in a 10-gallon or larger aquarium with plenty of live rock for hiding and as a supplemental food source. Small groups, or pairs, tend to do better in an aquarium, but need to be introduced to the tank simultaneously. Do not house these gobies with larger, aggressive fish or invertebrates.The diet should consist of a variety of fresh or frozen seafood, brine shrimp, and mysis shrimp. It needs to be fed twice per day

(this is off the list, care level is difficult)
Saltwater Aquarium Fish for Marine Aquariums: Yellow Stripe Clingfish
Yellow Stripe Clingfish (Diademichthys lineatus)
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Red, Tan, Yellow
Diet: Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Solomon Islands
Family: Gobiesocidae
A 10 gallon or larger aquarium with plenty of live rock and corals provide a suitable environment for the Yellow Stripe Clingfish. These fish also will live in close association with a long spine urchin or branching corals. The fish uses this association for both protection and for food. The Yellow Stripe Clingfish also preys upon parasitic bivalves that attack various species of corals. As a carnivore, the Yellow Stripe Clingfish will thrive on a diet of meaty foods such as finely chopped fresh or frozen marine fish, squid, mysis shrimp, vitamin-enriched brine shrimp, and frozen carnivore preparations.

(I would like a smaller version of this fish, should have anemone for it and should only have one)
Buy Percula Clownfish Online | Vivid Aquariums
Percula Clownfish (Amphiprion percula)
Maximum Length: 3.1 in.
Care Level: Easy
Family: Pomacentridae
Reef Compatibility: Excellent
Minimum Aquarium Size: 30 gal.
Range: Western Pacific
Diet: Omnivore
Water Conditions: 74-80� F; sg 1.020-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4
As with most clownfish the Percula Clownfish is best kept singly unless a pair is introduced together. It may attack other clownfishes and nip at passive tank-mates who wonder near its host anemone or territory. Generally, it is a great fish for the reef aquarium and spends much of its time nestled peacefully in its anemone. The Percula Clownfish does not require a host anemone for survival; however it is a real treat for any hobbyist to observe the symbiotic relationship between the clownfish and its host anemone.

(like these better than the above clown fish but still would rather have a smaller version, should get a pair)
Saltwater Aquarium Fish for Marine Aquariums: Ocellaris Clownfish, Tank Bred
Ocellaris Clownfish, Tank Bred (Amphiprion ocellaris)
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025
Max. Size: 3"
Color Form: Black, Orange, White
Diet: Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Tank Bred - Africa, Tank Bred - Asia, Tank Bred - England, Tank Bred - USA
Family: Pomacentridae
The Tank-Bred Ocellaris Clownfish has other unique advantages over wild-caught species. For one, the Tank-Bred Ocellaris Clownfish is very hardy and more accustomed to conditions found in home aquariums. Therefore, it makes a great choice for novices and seasoned aquarists alike. The Tank-Bred Ocellaris Clownfish can also be kept with a variety of other tank-bred clownfish, if introduced into the aquarium at the same time.

(my tank is only 29g, seems like these guys need a school so they are probably off the list, I love the look though)
Spotted Cardinalfish
Spotted Cardinalfish (Sphaeramia nematoptera)
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025
Max. Size: 3"
Color Form: Green, White
Diet: Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Coral Sea, Fiji, Indo-Pacific
Family: Apogonidae
For the best care, the Spotted Cardinalfish should be kept in small schools in suitably sized aquariums of at least 30 gallons. Because the Spotted Cardinalfish is a slow and methodical swimmer, it should be housed with peaceful tankmates and offered a plethora of hiding places amongst rockwork or plants. Most Spotted Cardinalfish will tend to hide in sea grass or other plants. Some may also camouflage themselves against long spined sea urchins.

(These guys are small and eat algea, top of the list)
Saltwater Aquarium Fish for Marine Aquariums: Tail Spot Blenny
Tail Spot Blenny (Ecsenius stigmatura)
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Black, Blue, Orange, Yellow
Diet: Herbivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Cebu
Family: Blenniidae
Generally found amid crevices and rocks on the bottom of its environment, the Tail Spot Blenny needs a tank of at least 10 gallons with plenty of live rock for grazing, perching and hiding. They should not be housed with aggressive species that may intimidate these fish into hiding.The diet of the Tail Spot Blenny should include vegetable matter, including frozen and dried foods containing marine and blue-green algae. It will also feed on (and help control) algae growing in the aquarium.
(Like these guys, one or two would be great for the tank)

Saltwater Aquarium Fish for Marine Aquariums: Dracula Goby
Dracula Goby (Stonogobiops dracula)
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025
Max. Size: 3"
Color Form: Red, White
Diet: Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Fiji, Maldives, Sri Lanka
Family: Gobiidae
Native to the relatively shallow reefs of the Maldives, wild specimens of the Dracula Goby inhabit open sand areas dotted with rubble near the base of reef structures. In the home aquarium, the Dracula Goby does best when housed in similar habitats. Like other Shrimp Gobies in the Gobiidae family, the Dracula Goby digs shallow burrows in sandy substrate and seldom strays far from its claimed territory. Instead, most prefer to perch on the sand just outside or hover in the water column directly above the burrow entrance. Feed these carnivores a varied diet of mysis shrimp and other frozen meaty foods, and suitable phytoplankton and flake foods. Most gobies do best when fed multiple small meals throughout the day. To best recreate natural feeding conditions, it is best to place the food in the outflow of a water pump or wavemaker so it actively disperses into the water column.

(Want one! Need to wait until the tank is well established though)
Saltwater Aquarium Crabs for Marine Reef Aquariums: Electric Orange Hermit Crab
Electric Orange Hermit Crab (Calcinus cf elegans)
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Blue, Orange, Tan
Diet: Omnivore
Supplements: Calcium, Magnesium, Iodine, Trace Elements
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Hawaiian Islands
Family: Diogenidae
With its voracious appetite for algae, the Electric Orange Hermit Crab will help keep green hair algae and cyanobacteria levels diminished in the aquarium. As an added benefit, this species of Calcinus also helps aerate your aquarium substrate as it sifts through the sand in search of food sources. Many aquarists supply dried seaweed to keep hungry Electric Orange Hermit Crabs fed when algae levels are insufficient.

---------------------------------
plants

(hmm, plant eating fish might kill this guy)
Kelp on Rock, Grape
Kelp on Rock, Grape (Botryocladia sp.)
Care Level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Compatible: Yes
Lighting: Moderate to High
Waterflow: Medium
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Color Form: Red
Supplements: Calcium, Trace Elements, Iron
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Indo-Pacific
Family: Grateloupiaceae
The proper environment for Grape Kelp is an aquarium with plenty of live rock, and has moderate to high illumination. Protection must be provided for this species against predation from herbivorous fish, as this is one of their favorite meals.

(this one is high on my list, plant wise)
Mermaid's Fan Plant
Mermaid's Fan Plant (Udotea sp.)
Care Level: Moderate
Lighting: Moderate
Waterflow: Medium
Placement: Bottom
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Color Form: Green
Supplements: Calcium, Trace Elements, Iron
Origin: Caribbean
Family: Halimedaceae
The Mermaid's Fan plant, a green calcareous algae found throughout the Caribbean, is used as a decorative plant in the marine aquarium. These plants have short stems that grow out of the substrate or live rock. These plants form a fan like leaf that is oval to round in shape. They are calcareous algae that deposit limestone (calcium carbonate) in their tissues. The Mermaid's Fan plant is generally hardy in the right conditions, and few fish will feed on them. In addition to light, they require sufficient calcium to grow. They are not as tolerant of high nitrate or phosphate levels compared to some other algae. They also do not tolerate extensive pruning.

---------------------------------
corals

(pretty but aggressive, have to think about it, plus it get pretty big)
Saltwater Aquarium Corals for Marine Reef Aquariums: Hammer Coral, Branching
Hammer Coral, Branching (Euphyllia parancora)
Care Level: Moderate
Temperament: Aggressive
Lighting: Moderate
Waterflow: Medium
Placement: Bottom
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Color Form: Green, Tan
Supplements: Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Australia, Indonesia, Solomon Islands
Family: Caryophylliidae
It is moderately difficult to maintain, but with proper water conditions in the aquarium, it will thrive. It will require moderate lighting combined with moderate water movement within the aquarium. At night, its sweeper tentacles can extend up to six inches in the reef aquarium, stinging other species of corals and animals. Allow plenty of room between it and other neighboring corals. For continued good health, it will also require the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.

Saltwater Aquarium Corals for Marine Reef Aquariums: Colony Polyp, Ultra Colored, Zoanthus sp.
Colony Polyp, Ultra Colored (Zoanthus sp.)
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Lighting: Moderate
Waterflow: Medium
Placement: Middle to Top
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Color Form: Green, Tan, Yellow
Supplements: Iodine, Trace Elements
Origin: Indonesia, Maricultured - Indonesia, Solomon Islands
Family: Zoanthidae
The Ultra Colored Colony Polyp has the ability to sting other polyps or corals. While the sting is not strong, be sure to provide sufficient space between the Ultra Colored Colony Polyp and other corals because of its semi-aggressive temperament and potential to crowd out neighbors.Similar to other Zoanthus Colony Polyp Corals, the Ultra Colored Colony Polyp is easy to maintain, making it a good choice for beginner reef aquarists. The Ultra Colored Colony Polyp requires moderate light levels combined with medium water movement within the aquarium. For continued good health, the Ultra Colored Colony Polyp will also require the addition of iodine and other trace elements.Under ideal conditions, the Ultra Colored Colony Polyp will multiply without difficulty in home reef aquariums by budding (splitting off a portion of their base or mouth) to increase the size of the colony.

(high on the list)
Saltwater Aquarium Corals for Marine Reef Aquariums: Giant Green Polyp Duncanopsammia - Aquacultured
Giant Green Polyp Duncan - Aquacultured (Duncanopsammia axifuga)
Care Level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Lighting: Low to Moderate
Waterflow: Low
Placement: Bottom to Middle
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Color Form: Green, Purple
Supplements: Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Aquacultured - Drs. Foster & Smith
Family: Dendrophylliidae
This coral is peaceful and does well with other non-aggressive corals and invertebrates, provided it has ample room to grow. Though they feed through photosynthesis via the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae that thrive on the colony, this coral also benefits from regular target feedings of meaty marine foods such as enriched mysis and brine shrimp.

(high on the list)
Saltwater Aquarium Corals for Marine Reef Aquariums: Duncanopsammia Coral - Aquacultured, USA, Duncanopsammia axifuga
Duncanopsammia Coral - Aquacultured USA (Duncanopsammia axifuga)
Care Level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Lighting: Low to Moderate
Waterflow: Low
Placement: Bottom to Middle
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Color Form: Green, Purple
Supplements: Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements
Origin: Aquacultured - USA
Family: Dendrophylliidae
This striking stunner boasts vibrant purple and green tentacles that retract when disturbed, but otherwise remain on full display all day and night. Duncanopsammia Coral colonies form via long, tubular corallites with brilliant neon green oral discs.Native to the deeper waters of Western and Northern Australia and the South China Sea, Duncanopsammia Coral prefers to attach to solid objects in soft, sandy areas. Here, they readily propagate and often form a continuous mat of tentacles that conceal the overall shape of the underlying colony. In the home aquarium, place in low current areas with low to moderate light.This coral is peaceful and does well with other non-aggressive corals and invertebrates, provided it has ample room to grow. Though they feed through photosynthesis via the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae that thrive on the colony, this coral also benefits from regular target feedings of meaty marine foods such as enriched mysis and brine shrimp.

(high on the list)
Saltwater Aquarium Corals for Marine Reef Aquariums: Lavender Mushroom
Lavender Mushroom (Rhodactis sp.)
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Lighting: Low to Moderate
Waterflow: Medium
Placement: Bottom to Middle
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Color Form: Green, Purple
Supplements: Iodine, Trace Elements
Origin: Fiji
Family: Discosomatidae
The Lavender Mushroom is easy to maintain in the reef aquarium, and a good choice for the beginner hobbyist. It is somewhat aggressive, however, and can harm sessile invertebrates and overgrow other inhabitants of the reef. It requires a low to medium light level combined with a medium water movement within the aquarium.

(pretty but not sure about this one)
Saltwater Aquarium Corals for Marine Reef Aquariums: Green Fluorescent Mushroom
Green Fluorescent Mushroom (Actinodiscus sp.)
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Lighting: Moderate
Waterflow: Low to Medium
Placement: All
Water Conditions: 72-78 F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025
Color Form: Green
Supplements: Iodine, Trace Elements
Origin: Indonesia
Family: Actinodiscidae/Discosomatidae
They are hardy and easy to maintain. In general, they need a medium light level, and should be placed lower in the tank if the light intensity is high. These mushrooms require a low to moderate indirect water flow. Too much water movement will inhibit these mushrooms to fully expand. They are semi-aggressive and require adequate space between themselves and other corals and sessile invertebrates. Each ships as several individual mushrooms attached to one rock. The Green Fluorescent Mushroom receives most of its nutritional requirements through the photosynthesis of the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae which it hosts. It also feeds on other nutrients and particulate matter and benefits from additional food in the form of micro-plankton or brine shrimp fed to each polyp of the colony.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:42 PM   #64
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Nice......
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Old 01-31-2013, 04:33 PM   #65
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Still no movement on clearing up the nitrites. Had to redose with ammonia. I have a feeling that one day the nitrites are just going to be gone. My ammonia eating critters are obviously doing very well though.
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Old 01-31-2013, 04:39 PM   #66
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Still no movement on clearing up the nitrites. Had to redose with ammonia. I have a feeling that one day the nitrites are just going to be gone. My ammonia eating critters are obviously doing very well though.
any signs of nitrAtes ?
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Old 01-31-2013, 04:52 PM   #67
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any signs of nitrAtes ?
Yep, creeping up slowly. The problem right now it I have such a nitrite build up there is no way to read the results, off the chart.
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Old 01-31-2013, 05:32 PM   #68
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mine was like that it showed 5 for a coupe of days then went to 0
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Old 01-31-2013, 05:40 PM   #69
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Okay now I'm really confused. I'm color blind but I can tell the difference between blue and brown-ish. I think I'm reading this thing wrong. The nitrites are either not there or the test color comparison sheet is wrong.

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Old 01-31-2013, 05:44 PM   #70
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Okay now I'm really confused. I'm color blind but I can tell the difference between blue and brown-ish. I think I'm reading this thing wrong. The nitrites are either not there or the test color comparison sheet is wrong.
You sure you didn't use the Ph bottle?
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